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Charles Town is a city in Jefferson County, West Virginia, United States, and is also the county seat.[6] The population was 5,259 at the 2010 census.

Charles Town, West Virginia
City of Charles Town
Jefferson County Courthouse in Charles Town
Jefferson County Courthouse in Charles Town
Location of Charles Town in Jefferson County, West Virginia.
Location of Charles Town in Jefferson County, West Virginia.
Coordinates: 39°17′3″N 77°51′22″W / 39.28417°N 77.85611°W / 39.28417; -77.85611Coordinates: 39°17′3″N 77°51′22″W / 39.28417°N 77.85611°W / 39.28417; -77.85611
CountryUnited States
StateWest Virginia
CountyJefferson
Named forCharles Washington
Government
 • MayorScott Rogers
 • City managerDaryl Hennessy
Area
 • City5.83 sq mi (15.11 km2)
 • Land5.83 sq mi (15.11 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
512 ft (164 m)
Population
 • City5,259
 • Estimate 
(2018)[3]
6,064
 • Density1,020.91/sq mi (394.17/km2)
 • Metro
5,582,170
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
25414
Area code(s)304, 681
FIPS code54-14610[4]
GNIS feature ID1554110[5]
Websitecharlestownwv.us

HistoryEdit

18th centuryEdit

 
Happy Retreat

"Charlestown" was established by an act of the Virginia General Assembly in January 1787.[7] However, for about two decades, confusion arose because the same name was also used for a town established in Ohio County at the mouth of Buffalo Creek, and authorized in the 1791 term of that local court. That area in 1797 became known as Brooke County, with that "Charlestown" as its county seat until a December 27, 1816 act of the Virginia General Assembly changed its name to Wellsburg, to honor a trader and his son.[8]

Charles Washington, the founder of Charles Town, was born in Hunting Creek, now Fairfax County, Virginia on May 2, 1738. He was the youngest full brother of George Washington. He came to present Jefferson County between April and October 1780. The estate of Charles Washington, Happy Retreat, was erected in 1780. In 1786, on 80 acres (320,000 m²) of his adjoining land, Charles laid out the streets of Charles Town,[9] naming many of them after his brothers and one after his wife, Mildred. He donated the four corner lots at the intersection of George and Washington Streets for public buildings of the town and county, provided the town become the seat of the county separated from Berkeley County,

In 1794, James Madison married "Dolly" Todd at Harewood, the home of George Steptoe Washington, son of Colonel Samuel Washington, just outside Charles Town.

19th centuryEdit

Jefferson County was formed in 1801 as Charles Washington had anticipated. The county court house stands on one of the lots he donated, as did the jail until 1919 when it was demolished to be replaced by the post office.

Charles Washington died sometime between July and September, 1799, only a short while before the death of his brother George. Charles' and his wife Mildred's grave sites near Evitts Run have recently been located and surrounded by a stone wall.

In 1844, the first issue of the Spirit of Jefferson newspaper was published in Charles Town by James W. Beller. It is still published as the Spirit of Jefferson-Advocate, making it one of the oldest newspapers in the state.

On October 16, 1859, abolitionist John Brown and his followers raided the Federal arsenal at nearby Harpers Ferry, seven miles east of Charles Town. The insurrection was ultimately put down and John Brown was tried for treason in the town's Jefferson County court house. On December 2, 1859, he was hanged in Charles Town at the Gibson-Todd House, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

During the first two years of the American Civil War, the front lines of the Union and Confederate armies in the area fluctuated and the town frequently changed hands during the military engagements in the surrounding areas with the town first occupied by Confederate troops, then Union troops, then back to Confederate until 1863 when Union troops occupied the town on a permanent basis for the remainder of the war.

In 1883, the Valley Telephone Company was incorporated in West Virginia and began installing telephone lines throughout Jefferson County. The company's main office was in Charles Town.

20th centuryEdit

In 1922, William Blizzard, a leader of striking coal miners, was charged with treason and murder for engaging in warfare against state and federal troops in Mingo and Logan Counties. He was tried in the Jefferson County courthouse in Charles Town and was found not guilty.

The Charles Town Race Track first opened in 1933. It was built on land purchased from the Charles Town Horse Show Association. In 1999, the Charles Town Race Track underwent major renovation which included a large addition to house video slot machines. It was renamed Charles Town Races & Slots. It's now[timeframe?] the Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races.

In 1975, the new Jefferson Memorial Hospital opened, replacing the old Charles Town General Hospital. It is now[timeframe?] part of the West Virginia University Hospitals (WVUH-East) chain of health care facilities, and was renamed Jefferson Medical Center in 2013.

Geography and climateEdit

Charles Town is located in the lower Shenandoah Valley at 39°17′3″N 77°51′22″W / 39.28417°N 77.85611°W / 39.28417; -77.85611 (39.284237, -77.856211).[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.81 square miles (15.05 km2), all of it land.[11]

Charles Town is located 73 miles northwest of Washington, D.C. and 75 miles west of Baltimore.

Due to its low elevation for West Virginia, Charles Town is on the northern extent of the Humid Subtropical climate zone, having cool to mildly cold winters and hot and humid summers. Precipitation is evenly distributed throughout the year, providing lush, abundant plant growth.

TransportationEdit

 
US 340 and WV 9 in Charles Town

Charles Town is served primarily by two main highways, U.S. Route 340 and West Virginia Route 9, which run concurrently for a short stretch in the vicinity of Charles Town. US 340 travels in a general southwest to northeast direction, connecting Charles Town to locations in the eastern Shenandoah Valley of Virginia to the southwest. To the northeast, US 340 provides direct access to Harpers Ferry and Frederick. WV 9 traverses the region with a northwest-to-southeast orientation, connecting Charles Town to Martinsburg and Leesburg. Additional highways serving Charles Town include West Virginia Route 51 and West Virginia Route 115.

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
18501,507
18601,376−8.7%
18701,59315.8%
18802,01626.6%
18902,28713.4%
19002,3924.6%
19102,66211.3%
19202,527−5.1%
19302,434−3.7%
19402,92620.2%
19503,0353.7%
19603,3299.7%
19703,023−9.2%
19802,857−5.5%
19903,1229.3%
20002,907−6.9%
20105,25980.9%
Est. 20186,064[3]15.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]

2010 censusEdit

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 5,259 people, 2,011 households, and 1,289 families residing in the city. The population density was 905.2 inhabitants per square mile (349.5/km2). There were 2,270 housing units at an average density of 390.7 per square mile (150.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 76.9% White, 13.3% African American, 0.3% Native American, 2.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 3.7% from other races, and 3.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.0% of the population.

There were 2,011 households of which 37.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.3% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.9% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.19.

The median age in the city was 35.5 years. 26.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 31.4% were from 25 to 44; 22.5% were from 45 to 64; and 12.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.9% male and 51.1% female.

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 2,907 people, 1,285 households, and 732 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,082.3 people per square mile (801.7/km²). There were 1,396 housing units at an average density of 999.9 per square mile (385.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 78.91% White, 17.54% African American, 0.10% Native American, 1.03% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.62% from other races, and 1.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.55% of the population.

There were 1,285 households out of which 25.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.5% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.0% were non-families. 36.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the city, the population was spread out with 22.9% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 18.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,538, and the median income for a family was $43,547. Males had a median income of $30,917 versus $22,241 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,104. About 13.2% of families and 15.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.3% of those under age 18 and 13.4% of those age 65 or over.

Notable peopleEdit

SchoolsEdit

For more information see Jefferson County Schools.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2013.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  7. ^ "An act to establish a town on the lands of Charles Washington, in the county of Berkeley, Hening's Statutes at Large, Vol. XII, Chapter LXXX". vagenweb.org. Retrieved 2017-03-05.
  8. ^ Nancy L. Caldwell, A History of Brooke County, (Brooke County Historical Society 1975), p. 4
  9. ^ Ambler, Charles Henry. "George Washington and the West". Historic Pittsburgh Text Collection. University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved September 20, 2013.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved January 24, 2013.
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.

External linksEdit