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Charles Gilbert Gould (May 5, 1845 - December 5, 1916) was a Union Army soldier in the American Civil War who received the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor.[1]

Charles G. Gould
Born(1845-05-05)May 5, 1845
Windham County, Vermont
DiedDecember 5, 1916(1916-12-05) (aged 71)
Buried
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
RankCaptain
UnitVermont Company H, 5th Vermont Infantry
Battles/warsAmerican Civil War
Awards Medal of Honor

Gould was born in Windham County, Vermont on May 5, 1845. He was awarded the Medal of Honor, for extraordinary heroism shown on April 2, 1865, while serving as a Captain with Company H, 5th Vermont Infantry, at Petersburg, Virginia. His Medal of Honor was issued on July 30, 1890.[2]

He died at the age of 71, on December 5, 1916 and was buried at the Windham Center Cemetery in Windham, Vermont.

Medal of Honor citationEdit

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Captain (Infantry) Charles Gilbert Gould, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 2 April 1865, while serving with Company H, 5th Vermont Infantry, in action at Petersburg, Virginia. Among the first to mount the enemy's works in the assault, Captain Gould received a serious bayonet wound in the face, was struck several times with clubbed muskets, but bravely stood his ground, and with his sword killed the man who bayoneted him.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Medal of Honor Recipients". United States Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  2. ^ "GOULD, CHARLES G." Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  3. ^ "Valor awards for Charles Gilbert Gould". Military Times, Hall of Valor. Archived from the original on 2014-08-12. Retrieved 11 August 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)

External linksEdit

  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Army Center of Military History.