Charles A. Coulombe

Charles A. Coulombe (born 8 November 1960) is an American Catholic author and lecturer. Coulombe is known for his writing on and advocacy of monarchism.[1][2]

Charles A. Coulombe
Charles A. Coulombe, Great War commemoration in Croatia 02.jpg
Charles A. Coulombe (right) with a Croatian Monarchist holding a Croatian Royal flag
Born (1960-11-08) 8 November 1960 (age 60)
NationalityAmerican
Known forHis writing on and advocacy of Monarchism
2018, Charles A. Coulombe during a World War I commemoration in Zagreb, organized by Croatian monarchists and nobility

LifeEdit

Charles A. Coulombe was born in Manhattan on November 8, 1960. His parents were actors, and six years later the family moved to Hollywood, California, taking up residence in an apartment building owned by The Amazing Criswell, the then famed television psychic through whom he met the now-famous film-maker, Ed Wood. Depending upon their financial fortunes, Coulombe went to a mixture of private and public schools in the Los Angeles area, attending college at New Mexico Military Institute and California State University, Northridge, majoring in political Science.

After spending three years as a stand-up comic on the Sunset Strip, Coulombe authored his first book, Everyman Today Call Rome, a look at the Catholic Church in America from an under-30 viewpoint. In 1990, some of his poetry was published in The White Cockade. Coulombe's work has appeared in more than 20 journals, including regular columns in Fidelity of Australia, PRAG of London, Monarchy Canada, and Creole of Louisiana.[citation needed] A contributing editor and regular movie reviewer to the National Catholic Register, he has also been a frequent contributor to such publications as the Catholic Herald, Success, Catholic Twin Circle, FATE and New Oxford Review.

Lecturing on a wide variety of religious, political, historical, and literary topics has taken him throughout the U.S., Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. In August 1992, he spoke at Oxford University, England. In October 1993 he embarked on a lecture tour of Ireland, Scotland, and England. The following year he returned to the latter two nations, and in 1995 spoke at Oxford and Cambridge. Coulombe has lectured repeatedly at the University of Southern California on the history of rock and roll, and at Cleveland's John Carroll University on medieval monarchy. He has acted as a media consultant on all things Catholic, especially the history of the Papacy. Alongside William L. Biersach, Coulombe regularly lectures at St. Therese's Church in Alhambra, California on various topics regarding the Catholic Faith.

Coulombe serves as Western U.S. Delegate of the Grand Council of the U.K.-based International Monarchist League, and a member of the Catholic Writer's Guild of Great Britain (the Keys), the Royal Stuart Society and the Knights of Peter Claver.[3] Coulombe is also a founding board member of the Los Angeles-based Queen of Angels Foundation, a Roman Catholic devotional society.

Coulombe aligns with and has voted for the American Solidarity Party.[4]

In 2018, he moved from Los Angeles to Trumau, Austria, where he currently resides and studies theology at the International Theological Institute.

Alongside Mr Vincent Frankini of Tumblar House Catholic Books, Coulombe produces "Off the Menu", a weekly Catholic podcast available on YouTube and Spotify among other platforms. Coulombe and Frankini discuss current events (political, ecclesiastical, etc) as well as answering questions from the listeners. Coulombe is a Traditionalist Catholic[5] who has defended the Society of Saint Pius X.[6] He supports the establishment of a Catholic state.[7]

QuotesEdit

[W]hat is certain is that the ruins and traces of the Holy Empire are all about us. An understanding of its history and continuing influence is key to understanding the practical implications of the Social Kingship of Christ — which idea, in so many ways, is the ideal successive Emperors and their loyal subjects sought to follow on Earth, and without which, as Pius XI teach[es] in Quas primas, real peace is impossible. Whether or not the Great Monarch returns in our day (and I for one would be happy to see him), it would be good to know upon what basis such a Sovereign would rule; if nothing else, it shall show us what we ought to be able to expect of our rulers — and how far short they usually fall.

— "Sacrum Imperium", 2014[8]

I would rather be ruled by people who think they're gonna fry in Hell forever if they rule me poorly, than by people for whom I'm merely a convenient economic siphon who can be milked like a cow.

— interview with Stephen Heiner, 2010[9][10]

The 4th of July might inspire us to wear black armbands and bone up on our League of the South or United Empire Loyalist or Sinarquista or Societe Saint Jean Baptiste literature, or else mindlessly chant in unison the praises of infanticidal freedom as the true spirit of ’76. But a far better response would be to enjoy the picnics, concerts, parades, and fireworks; deepen our knowledge of national, state (both parks and historical societies), and local history; and ponder how we, as individuals, can best evangelise our own corner of the country that we ought to love because God has seen fit to place us here.

— "The Perfect Versus the Good", 2014[11]

The judiciary have, in a very real sense, made themselves the source of authority; thus for many of us, whatever is legal is moral.

— "The Rulers and the Ruled", 2016[12]

BibliographyEdit

BooksEdit

  • Coulombe, Charles A., ed. (2002). The muse in the bottle : great writers on the joys of drinking. New York: Citadel Press.
  • —, ed. (2003). Classic horror stories : sixteen legendary stories of the supernatural. Guilford, Conn.: Lyons Press.
  • — (2004). Haunted castles of the world : ghostly legends and phenomena from keeps and fortresses around the globe. Guilford, Conn.: Lyons Press.
  • — (2004). Haunted places in America : a guide to spooked and spooky public places in the United States. Guilford, Conn.: Lyons Press.
  • Rum: The Epic Story of the Drink That Conquered the World, Citadel, 2004. ISBN 0-8065-2581-9
  • — (2008). The Pope's legion : the multinational fighting force that defended the Vatican. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Puritan's Empire, Tumblar House, 2008. ISBN 978-0-9791600-5-9
  • Desire & Deception, Tumblar House, 2009. ISBN 978-0-9842365-1-0
  • The White Cockade: Catholic Poetry and Verse, Tumblar House, 2009. ISBN 978-0-9842365-0-3
  • Everyman Today Call Rome, Tumblar House, 2011. ISBN 978-0-9842365-6-5
  • Vicars of Christ, Tumblar House, 2014. ISBN 978-0-9883537-2-5
  • Star-Spangled Crown, Tumblar House, 2016. ISBN 978-1-944339-05-0
  • — (2017). A Catholic quest for the Holy Grail. Charlotte, NC: TAN Books.
  • Blessed Charles of Austria: A Holy Emperor and His Legacy, TAN Books, 2020. ISBN 978-1-5051-1328-0

ArticlesEdit

  • Coulombe, Charles A. (Winter–Spring 2006). "Rum, Romanism, and rebellion ... enumerated, explained, extolled". Catholic Men's Quarterly. 2 (4): 8–13.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ariel Sabar (March 27, 2013). "A King With No Country". Washingtonian.
  2. ^ Leslie Wayne (January 6, 2018). "What's the Cure for Ailing Nations? More Kings and Queens, Monarchists Say". New York Times.
  3. ^ International Monarchist League Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved: 30 November 2015[dead link]
  4. ^ Coulombe, Charles A. "The American Solidarity Party". YouTube. Retrieved 22 December 2018.
  5. ^ "Charles Coulombe Responds". Tumbler House Catholic Bookstore. May 9, 2018. Retrieved July 3, 2020.
  6. ^ "Coulombe: Attendance at SSPX not Grave Disobedience". February 28, 2018. Retrieved July 3, 2020.
  7. ^ Coulombe, Charles (May 9, 2018). "Quest for the Catholic State". Tumbler House Catholic Bookstore. Retrieved July 3, 2020.
  8. ^ "Sacrum Imperium". Catholicism.org. Retrieved 6 March 2014.
  9. ^ TR Media: Sir Charles Coulombe, Monarchy, with Stephen Heiner, 2010. YouTube. Retrieved: 6 March 2014.
  10. ^ An Explanation of Anarcho-Monarchist Distributism (at 33:13 - 33:26). YouTube. Retrieved: 6 March 2014.
  11. ^ Charles, Coulombe. "The Perfect Versus the Good". Catholicism.org. Retrieved 17 July 2015.
  12. ^ Charles, Coulombe. "The Rulers and the Ruled". tumblarhouse.com. Retrieved 25 May 2016.

External linksEdit