Chang Ya-chung (Chinese: 張亞中; pinyin: Zhāng Yàzhōng; born December 1954) is a Taiwanese political scientist. He founded the Democratic Action Alliance [zh] in 2004 and was elected to the National Assembly in 2005, but resigned on the first day to protest the parliament's formation. He later chaired the Chinese Integration Association [zh].

Chang Ya-chung
張亞中
Yia-Chung Chang (cropped).jpg
Chang in 2012
BornDecember 1954 (age 65)
NationalityRepublic of China
EducationDoctor of Philosophy
Alma materNational Chengchi University
University of Hamburg
Political partyKuomintang

Academic careerEdit

Chang earned doctorates from National Chengchi University and the University of Hamburg.[1] He taught at Nanhua University until 2003 and is now a professor at National Taiwan University.[2]

Political careerEdit

Chang founded the Democratic Action Alliance [zh] in 2004.[3] The alliance was backed by laborers.[4] The organization demonstrated against several of Chen Shui-bian's policies, namely legislative approval of a weapons procurement deal with the United States,[5][6] and amendments to the Constitution of the Republic of China pertaining to the powers of the National Assembly.[7] In 2005, Chang was elected to the National Assembly representing the Democratic Action Alliance,[8] but resigned on the first day of meetings to protest the parliament's formation, as it was convened solely to consider constitutional amendments proposed by the Legislative Yuan that led directly to the National Assembly's suspension.[9] The amendments passed with support from the Kuomintang and Democratic Progressive Party.[10] In 2006, Chang and the Democratic Action Alliance asked that the Kuomintang initiate recall proceedings against party member Hsu Tsai-li, who had been found guilty of corruption while serving as mayor of Keelung.[11]

Chang later became chairman of the Chinese Integration Association [zh].[12][13] Following the election of Ma Ying-jeou to the presidency in 2008, Chang drafted a "Basic Agreement on Peaceful Cross-Strait Development" to be negotiated with China, published in the Journal of Current Chinese Affairs in 2010.[14][15] Chang helped organize the Taipei Forum in 2012 to discuss Cross-Strait relations.[16][17] That same year, Chang was appointed to a government committee to develop new guidelines for high school history textbooks.[18][19] He also worked as an adviser to three textbook publishing companies.[20] Chang has served as an aide to Hung Hsiu-chu and advised her 2016 presidential campaign.[21][22] He received credit for developing Hung's "one China, same interpretation" Cross-Strait policy.[23][24] Chang's own view on Cross-Strait relations has been described as "one China, three constitutions [zh]."[25][26][27] While Hung served as Kuomintang chairwoman, the party passed a resolution supporting the establishment of the Sun Yat-sen School [zh].[28] The school was founded in March 2017, and Chang was named its president.[29] Chang said later that year that the Sun Yat-sen School would field its own candidates to participate in Kuomintang primaries for local office.[30] The Sun Yat-sen School worked with the 800 Heroes veterans' organization and the National Civil Servant Association, among others, to petition in support of a question regarding pension reductions on the 2018 Taiwanese referendum.[31]

In January 2019, Chang announced that he would be contesting the Kuomintang's nomination for the 2020 presidential election.[32] He finished fifth of five candidates in the 2019 Kuomintang presidential primary won by Han Kuo-yu.

2019 Kuomintang Republic of China presidential primary results
Candidates Place Result
Han Kuo-yu Nominated 44.81%
Terry Gou 2nd 27.73%
Eric Chu 3rd 17.90%
Chou Hsi-wei 4th 6.02%
Chang Ya-chung 5th 3.54%

Following Han's loss in the presidential election, Kuomintang chairman Wu Den-yih announced his intention to resign. Before Wu had formally stepped down, Chang became the first to announce his candidacy for the 2020 Kuomintang chairmanship election.[33]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Ya-chung Chang". National Taiwan University. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  2. ^ "Ya-chung Chang (張亞中)". National Taiwan University. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  3. ^ Chang, Yun-ping (9 May 2004). "The KMT party-state is dead: Lee". Taipei Times. Retrieved 9 January 2019.
  4. ^ Ko, Shu-ling (7 June 2005). "Amendment package opponents create delays in first sitting". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  5. ^ Wang, Hsiao-wen (20 September 2004). "Rally opposing new arms bill to be held". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  6. ^ Ko, Shu-ling (21 September 2004). "Arms purchase opponents petition, plan protest action". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  7. ^ Ko, Shu-ling (10 May 2005). "Nuke-4 RIA holds relay hunger strike". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  8. ^ Ko, Shu-ling (15 May 2005). "DPP wins surprise victory in election". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  9. ^ Ko, Shu-ling (31 May 2005). "National Assembly has first meeting". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  10. ^ Ko, Shu-ling (8 June 2005). "National Assembly approves reforms". Taipei Times. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  11. ^ Wang, Flora (2 October 2010). "Democratic Action Alliance demands Ma force Hsu out". Taipei Times. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  12. ^ "FEATURE: Cross-strait relations give rise to metaphors aplenty". Taipei Times. 11 April 2010. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  13. ^ Hsiao, Alison (7 May 2015). "Groups protest curriculum changes". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  14. ^ Chang, Ya-chung (2010). "A Modest Proposal for a Basic Agreement on Peaceful Cross-Strait Development". Journal of Current Chinese Affairs. 39 (1): 133–148.
  15. ^ Hughes, Christopher R. (2010). "Commentary on "A Modest Proposal for a Basic Agreement on Peaceful Cross-Strait Development" by Chang Ya-chung". Journal of Current Chinese Affairs. 39 (1): 149–162.
  16. ^ Tzou, Jiing-wen (25 June 2012). "KMT denies entry to Chinese officials". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  17. ^ Wang, Chris (10 December 2012). "DPP set to attend forum with Chinese officials in Taipei". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  18. ^ Wang, Chris (17 July 2012). "Historians insist Ma should leave textbooks alone". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  19. ^ Loa, Iok-sin (12 June 2012). "DPP accuses Ma of brainwashing students". Taipei Times. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  20. ^ Wang, Chris (22 July 2013). "Sinicization of textbooks panned". Taipei Times. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  21. ^ Gerber, Abraham (23 July 2017). "KMT's Hung axes Thai trip over visa". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  22. ^ Hsu, Stacy (16 October 2016). "Eric Chu likened to former 'emperor'". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  23. ^ Peng, Hsien-chun (9 October 2015). "REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK: Hung's radical China stance leaves KMT no choice". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  24. ^ Lin, Sean (12 May 2017). "Sun Yat-sen School under fire following Hung campaigning". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  25. ^ Wang, Chris (10 April 2010). "Opinions differ on what metaphors to use for cross-Strait relations". Central News Agency. Retrieved 22 March 2019.
  26. ^ Wang, Chris (20 September 2011). "True consensus needed for Taiwan: academics". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  27. ^ Hsiao, Alison (10 October 2014). "'One country, two systems' is outdated policy: experts". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  28. ^ Hsu, Stacy (10 January 2018). "Sun Yat-sen School pushes back at China over independence accusation". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  29. ^ Hsiao, Alison (19 March 2017). "Ma Ying-jeou defends legacy, attacks KMT leadership". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  30. ^ Chen, Wei-han (10 October 2017). "School to field candidates for next year's elections". Taipei Times. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  31. ^ Shih, Hsiao-kuang (4 January 2018). "Groups to push pension reform referendum". Taipei Times. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  32. ^ Maxon, Ann (8 January 2019). "Ex-Hung Hsiu-chu aide eyes presidential run". Taipei Times. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  33. ^ Yu,-, Lai Yen-his, Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-ting; Lai, Yen-his; Yeh, Joseph (14 January 2020). "KMT should stick to 1992 consensus: chairman contender". Central News Agency. Retrieved 15 January 2020.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)