Certificate of public convenience and necessity

A certificate of public convenience and necessity or certificate of public convenience is a type of regulatory compliance certification for public service industries. Private companies wishing to provide essential public services in certain countries must be granted a CPCN before constructing facilities and offering services.

PhilippinesEdit

In the Philippines, a certificate of public convenience (CPC) is required for private provision of public services for which no franchise, either municipal or legislative, is required by law, such as a common carrier.[1]

United StatesEdit

The first U.S. state statutes for certificate of public convenience (CPCN) were issued in 1870, and the U.S. Congress included a certification provision in U.S. federal law in the Transportation Act of 1920.[2] Examples of industries requiring a CPCN from a U.S. state include the provision of telecommunications in New York state,[3] transportation of natural gas in Alaska,[4] and a range of public services in Illinois.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "What is a Certificate of Public Convenience (CPC)?". Philippine Law Library.
  2. ^ Jones, William K. (1979). "Origins of the Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity: Developments in the States, 1870 - 1920". Columbia Law Review. 79 (3): 426–516. doi:10.2307/1121802. JSTOR 1121802.
  3. ^ "CPCN: Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity". New York State Public Service Commission. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  4. ^ "15 U.S. Code § 720a - Issuance of certificate of public convenience and necessity". Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  5. ^ "Illinois Compiled Statutes: Sec. 8-406. Certificate of public convenience and necessity". Illinois General Assembly. Retrieved 27 December 2014.