Central Secretariat Service

Central Secretariat Service (Hindi: केंद्रीय सचिवालय सेवा) (abbreviated as CSS) is the administrative civil service under Group A[3] and Group B[4] of the Central Civil Services of the executive branch of the Government of India. They are governed by Central Secretariat Service Rules of 1962,[5] which has been issued under the powers of Article 309 of the Constitution of India.[5] The service members work under restrictions and rules of Central Civil Services (Conduct) Rules.

Central Secretariat Service
Service overview
Abbreviation CSS
Formerly known as ISS
Formed 1946
Country  India
Training Ground Institute of Secretariat Training and Management, New Delhi
Controlling authority Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension, Department of Personnel and Training
Legal personality Governmental: Government service
General nature Policy Formulation
Civil administration
Advisors to Ministers
Continuity of administration in the Cabinet Secretariat
Preceding service Imperial Secretariat Service (1919-1946)
Cadre Size 11,550 members (2017)[1]
(Group A - 2471; Group B - 9079)[1]
Selection UPSC Civil Services Examination (1946 to 2003)
UPSC Limited Departmental Competitive Examination (2003 to Current)
Association CSS Group A Officers Association[2]
Head of the Civil Services
Cabinet Secretary
Current: Rajiv Gauba

The service serves as the backbone of administrative work[6][7] and provides permanent bureaucracy and functionary staff in the Union Government ministries, Cabinet Secretariat, Central Secretariat and other offices of Government of India.

Based on CSS service model, State governments like Bihar, Uttar Pradesh have organised their own independent services like Bihar Secretariat Service[8] and Provincial Secretariat Service of UP.The Union Government ministries such like Railways, Defence and External Affairs, have organised their own independent services based on CSS model which are known as Railway Board Secretariat Service[9], Armed Forces Headquarters Civil Services and Indian Foreign Service, Group B respectively.

History

In the year 1919, the Imperial Secretariat Service came into being as one of the offshoots of the Lewllyn-Smith Committee which had been set up on the eve of the introduction of the Montagu–Chelmsford Reforms.[10] The posts of Assistant and Assistant Secretary/Under Secretary were filled by officers drawn from the Imperial Secretariat Service during the British Raj.[11] The recruitment of the members was made by Central Staff Selection Board, which was precursor of the Union Public Service Commission set up in 1926.[12]

In 1946, after India gained independence from Britain, the Imperial Secretariat Service was replaced by Central Secretariat Service in India. However, in Pakistan, a Central Secretariat Service was formed in Central Superior Services of Pakistan,[13] which was later replaced and renamed to Office Management Group (OMG) and Secretariat Group (SG).[13]

Thus, the CSS became one of the earliest organized services[10] in India.

Recruitment

 
Minister of State at Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions Jitendra Singh interacting with CSS officers in 2018.

From 1946 until 2003, 50 percent of direct recruitment into CSS[14] was through the Civil Services Examination conducted by the Union Public Service Commission,[15] the next 25 percent recruitment was through Annual Departmental Examination and next 25 percent by promotion.

However, after the cadre restructuring in 2003, the direct recruitment into CSS through the Civil Services Examination has been stopped.

The mode of recruitment was changed to the grade of Section Officer by way of 50% through Limited Departmental Competitive Examination by Union Public Service Commission[16] and 50% by seniority.

Allocation and placement

After appointment by the President, the officers (Entry grade/Probationers) are allocated to different Ministries/Departments under Government of India. The Group B officers work in the levels of Assistant Section Officer and Section Officer/Assistant Director (For Directorate). The Group A officers work in the levels of Under Secretary/Deputy Director (For Directorate), Deputy Secretary/Joint Director (For Directorate), Director, Joint Secretary[17][18] and Additional Secretary[17][19] under Central Staffing Scheme of Government of India. The officers are generally posted in various Ministries and Departments, intelligence agencies,[20] Apex /Autonomous organizations of Government of India located at different places in the Secretariat in New Delhi. They are also appointed in personal staff of Union Council of Ministers of India.[21][22]

Deputations

The officers are also posted outside Delhi, or at various places of the country in other offices upon deputation. They can also be deputed for service under an international organization, an autonomous body not controlled by the Government, or a private body as same as under Rule 6 (2)(ii) of IAS (Cadre) Rules.[23]

 
Minister of State at Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions Jitendra Singh interacting with CSS Forum in 2016.

In 2016, Government of India has approved officers to be posted on non-cadre posts in the secretariat of Northeastern states of India.[24][25]

Designations and Pay grade

Position / Pay Grade in the Government of India Level and Rank in the Central Government Order of Precedence
(As per Presidential order)
Equivalent Position or Designation in the State Government(s)
1 Entry Grade Assistant Section Officer / Entry-level (Probationer) OR Promoted from the post of UDC[26] - Review Officer in State Secretariat
2 Junior Time Scale Assistant Secretary / Section Officer - Section Officer
3 Junior Time Scale (NFSG) Assistant Secretary / Assistant Director (to the Directorate) - Under Secretary/Sub-Divisional Magistrate
4 Senior Time Scale Under Secretary or Deputy Director (to the Directorate) - Deputy Secretary/Additional District Magistrate
5 Junior Administrative Grade (JAG) Deputy Secretary or Joint Director (to the Directorate) - Joint Secretary/District Magistrate
6 Selection Grade Director - Additional Secretary /Deputy Commissioner/Special Secretary
7 Super Time Scale Joint Secretary to Government of India[a] 26 Secretary/Divisional Commissioner
Notes
  1. ^ CSS officers are also eligible for empanelment to rank of Additional Secretary to Government of India under Central Staffing Scheme. The minimum service balance is usually 2 years before retirement. The decision for promotion/empanelment depends on orders of Appointments Committee of the Cabinet.

Reforms

1st Cadre Restructure of 2003

In 2003, a committee was formed under the leadership of Additional Secretary (GOI). The direct induction of CSS officer through Civil Services Examination was permanently stopped. Also a new level G training program was organised for those in line of promotion in the rank of Joint Secretary (GOI) in the SAG level.[16]

2nd Cadre Restructure of 2010

The Government had set up a Committee on Cadre Restructuring of Central Secretariat Service (CSS) in June 2008. The Committee submitted its report in November 2008 for further reforms in the service. The report was finally accepted in 2010 and the number of posts at various levels including Deputy Secretaries and Directors were increased following the review [27]

3rd Cadre Restructure of 2013

A committee was formed under the leadership of Additional Secretary (GOI) in 2013 for further reforms in the service.[28] The report is currently pending with Prime Minister's Office and is expected to improve the service conditions by increasing the number of posts at the level of Deputy Secretaries.[citation needed]

Mandatory Training Program for CSS Officers

In addition to these, the Government has also introduced mandatory training programs at every level of promotion.[29] The CSS officers are trained both in India and abroad[30] in various institutions starting at Level E onwards.[31][32]

Controversies

Recently, some CSS officers have been in the list of corrupt bureaucrats and have come under the CBI scanner for alleged involvement in a few corruption cases.[33]

Notable members

Since its inception, CSS has produced few outstanding civil servants in India.[34] Influential members include - M.P. Singh[35] who was appointed as Vice-Chairman of Central Administrative Tribunal at Jabalpur Bench,[35] P.G. Lele who served as Additional Secretary to Government of India[36] in the Ministry of Finance and M.V. Ayyar who was empanelled as Secretary to Government of India.

Reportedly, in the 1960s, there have been Labour Secretary and Education Secretary in Government of India also from CSS.

List

Influence

The Railway Board Secretariat Service, the general administration staff in the Ministry of Railways, is modelled after the Central Secretariat Service.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "2017 Draft Civil List of Group A officers of CSS" (PDF). Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension. Retrieved 5 April 2017.
  2. ^ "Constitution of Office Council (DOPT)" (PDF). Retrieved 29 May 2014.
  3. ^ Complete Civil Service Schedule of the Civil Services Group A of India." Civil Service Group A - Government of India, 1 January 2011.
  4. ^ Complete Civil Service Schedule of the Central Civil Services Group B of India." Central Civil Service Group B - Government of India, 1 January 2011.
  5. ^ a b "The Central Secretariat Service Rules of 1962". Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension. Retrieved 10 February 2012.
  6. ^ "Central Secretariat employees demand timely promotions". Business Standard. June 3, 2015. Archived from the original on September 10, 2016. Retrieved September 11, 2016.
  7. ^ "Why implementing the Seventh Pay Commission recommendation is a herculean challenge". The Economic Times. December 20, 2015. Archived from the original on September 10, 2016. Retrieved September 11, 2016.
  8. ^ "Bihar Secretariat service staff on warpath". The Times of India. Retrieved 26 January 2019.
  9. ^ a b "Railway Ministry unable to create credible seniority list for 276 officers". The Indian Express. Retrieved 17 March 2017.
  10. ^ a b "History: Central Secretariat Service". Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension. Retrieved 17 May 2012.
  11. ^ Singh, Hoshiar (2011). Indian Administration. Pearson Education India. ISBN 9788131761199.
  12. ^ Maheshwari, Shriram (2002). A Dictionary of Public Administration. Orient Blackswan. ISBN 9788125022527.
  13. ^ a b "Office Management Group: CSS Pakistan". Central Superior Services of Pakistan. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  14. ^ "Mode of Recruitment into CSS cadre". Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions. Retrieved 27 August 2015.
  15. ^ "Federal Government takes first step in downsizing CSS officers". Business Standard. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  16. ^ a b "Cadre Restructure: Central Secretariat Service" (PDF). Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  17. ^ a b "First Report of the Committee on Cadre Restructuring of Central Secretariat Service" (PDF). Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  18. ^ "'Promotion scam' in railways". Business Standard. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  19. ^ "Archive: Minimum balance, no balance". Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 8 January 2017. Retrieved 8 January 2017.
  20. ^ "RAW to hunt for officers from CSS pool". The New Indian Express. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  21. ^ "Why babus want to be private secys to ministers now". GovernanceNow.com. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  22. ^ "Ashok Kumar appointed OSD to MoS PMO". The Hindu. India. 5 October 2015. Retrieved 20 October 2015.
  23. ^ "Deputation of CSS Officerse". Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  24. ^ "Government Offers Postings In North-East To Non-IAS, IPS Officers". NDTV. Retrieved 6 March 2016.
  25. ^ "Review of the Policy for inter cadre transfer/deputation for North East Cadres" (PDF). Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension. Retrieved 6 March 2016.
  26. ^ "Change of Nomenclature of the post of CSS cadre and CSCS cadre" (PDF). Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pension. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  27. ^ "2010 Cadre Restructuring of the Central Secretariat Service" (PDF). Government of India. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  28. ^ "2013 Cadre Restructuring of the Central Secretariat Service" (PDF). Government of India. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  29. ^ "Training policy of CSS Officers" (PDF). Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions, Government of India. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  30. ^ http://istm.nic.in/CourseCirculars/2011-12/Circular3309072012.pdf
  31. ^ "Over Rs 205 crore earmarked for training of babus". Business Standard. Retrieved 23 December 2016.
  32. ^ "Training of CSS Officers" (PDF). Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions, Government of India. Retrieved 23 December 2016.
  33. ^ "IAS, CSS officers came under CBI scanner: Government". The Indian Express. Retrieved 14 December 2015.
  34. ^ "Archive: Govt proposes to extend tenure of CSS officers". Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 8 January 2017. Retrieved 8 January 2017.
  35. ^ a b "Biography of Hon'ble Shri M.P. Singh: Vice Chairman (A) of CAT". Central Administrative Tribunal, Government of India. Retrieved 9 July 2016.
  36. ^ "Point of privilege 1992 : Attempt to influence some members of a Joint Parliamentary Committee by a Minister and a Government official" (PDF). Rajya Sabha. Retrieved 22 April 2016.
  37. ^ "Father of Indian modern legal education NR Madhava Menon dies at 84". India Today. Retrieved 8 May 2019.
  38. ^ "Father Of Indian Modern Legal Education Dr. NR Madhava Menon Passes Away". Livelaw.in. Retrieved 8 May 2019.

Books

  • Singh, Hoshiar (2011) Indian Administration. Pearson Education India ISBN 9788131761199.
  • Jayapalan, N. (2001) Indian Administration 2 Vols. Set. Atlantic Publishers & Distri ISBN 9788171569212.
  • Maheshwari, S.R. (2006) Public Administration in India: The Higher Civil Service. Oxford University Press ISBN 9780199087839.

External links

News

Other sources