Open main menu

Causeway Bay (Chinese: 銅鑼灣; Cantonese Yale: Tùnglòwāan) is a station on the MTR network on Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong. The station is between Wan Chai and Tin Hau stations on the Island Line.[1] It serves the locality of Causeway Bay and the Happy Valley Racecourse within Wan Chai District.

Causeway Bay

銅鑼灣
MTR
MTR rapid transit station
Causeway Bay Station 2013 part2.jpg
Platform 2
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese銅鑼灣
Simplified Chinese铜锣湾
Hanyu PinyinTóngluówān
Cantonese YaleTùnglòwāan
Literal meaningCopper gong bay
General information
LocationHennessy Road × Yee Wo Street, Causeway Bay
Wan Chai, Hong Kong
Coordinates22°16′49″N 114°11′01″E / 22.2802°N 114.1835°E / 22.2802; 114.1835Coordinates: 22°16′49″N 114°11′01″E / 22.2802°N 114.1835°E / 22.2802; 114.1835
Owned byMTR Corporation
Operated byMTR Corporation
Line(s)
Platforms2 (split level side platforms)
ConnectionsBus, public light bus, tram
Construction
Structure typeUnderground
Platform levels2
Disabled accessYes
Other information
Station codeCAB
History
Opened
  • 31 May 1985 (31 May 1985)
Services
Preceding station MTR MTR Following station
Wan Chai
towards Kennedy Town
Island line Tin Hau
towards Chai Wan
Track layout
1
P1 (upper level)
2
P2 (lower level)
Location
Hong Kong MTR system map
Hong Kong MTR system map
Causeway Bay
Location within the MTR system

Contents

HistoryEdit

In 1967, Freeman Fox and Wilbur Smith Associates released the government-commissioned Mass Transport Study, which proposed a new underground railway. The plan included the Island Line between Kennedy Town and Chai Wan stations.[2] When the Mass Transport Provisional Authority was founded, minor alterations were made with the Sheung Wan to Kennedy Town section cancelled.[note 1] The government gave approval on the 95-million-dollar construction of the line on 23 December 1980[3] and work started in October 1982. The first section of the line opened from Admiralty to Chai Wan on 31 May 1985.[2]

ServicesEdit

The station is situated between Wan Chai and Tin Hau stations on the Island Line.[1] The typical off-peak service is 17 trains per hour in both directions, which is a train every 3–6 minutes.[4] There was a time when there was a special service in operation between Admiralty and Tai Koo on the Island Line due to shortage of train operators.[3] This service was withdrawn after 1 October 1986, about 5 months after the extension to Sheung Wan.[3]

Station layoutEdit

The platforms of Causeway Bay station are constructed in a stacked arrangement, with platform 1 above platform 2.

G Ground level Exits
Walkway Western Concourse Vending machines, ATM
C Eastern Concourse Customer Service, MTRShops
Hang Seng Bank, vending machines, ATM
Octopus promotion machine, tourist information centre
Western Concourse Customer Service
ATM, i-centre internet service
Southern Concourse Customer Service
Vending machines, ATM, Octopus Promotion Machine
P1
Platform
Side platform, doors will open on the left
Platform 1      Island line towards Chai Wan (Tin Hau)
P2
Platform
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Platform 2      Island line towards Kennedy Town (Wan Chai)

[5]

Entrances/exitsEdit

Causeway Bay is a primary shopping district in Hong Kong[note 2] with exits from the MTR leading directly into major outlets such as Sogo and Times Square, which can be accessed through a long, upward sloping pedestrian walkway at Exit A.

Unlike other MTR stations, there are three different concourses in Causeway Bay station. After exiting the paid areas through the turnstiles, the other two concourses are inaccessible underground. The west and east concourses were opened on 31 May 1985 with the opening of the station, while the south concourse and Exit A were opened in 1994 with the opening of Times Square.

South concourseEdit

In the basement of Times Square:

West concourseEdit

In the basement of Causeway Bay Plaza (Phase 1):

  • B: Causeway Bay Plaza
  • C: Sino Plaza[7]

East concourseEdit

In the basement of Sogo Department Store:

  • D1 /D2/D3/D4: Sogo Department Store
  • E: Great George Street, (Next to Body Shop)
  • F1: Jardine's Crescent
  • F2: Hysan Place[7]
 
Causeway Bay Station East Concourse

Transport connectionsEdit

Bus routesEdit

These are the bus routes found in the vicinity of Causeway Bay station that provide connections with other areas not served by the MTR including Aberdeen/Wah Kwai Estate, Braemar Hill, Happy Valley, Jardine's Lookout, Kennedy Town, Lai Tak Tsuen, Lei Tung Estate, Park Road, Sham Wan/Wong Chuk Hang, Nam Cheong Station/Hoi Lai Estate, South Horizons, The Peak, Tin Wan, Tsing Yi/Cheung On, Wah Fu.

Hong Kong TramwaysEdit

Hong Kong Island's tramway system consists of an inner loop branching out at Causeway Bay towards Happy Valley. The nearest tram stop is located along Percival Street near the end of Matheson Street.

Plans to expand Causeway Bay StationEdit

In November 2006, MTR announced they would build an underground shopping mall and expand the current Causeway Bay station. The station will add 5 new exits:

and the current Exit E (Great George Street next to The Body Shop) will be removed. The plan also triples the current station size.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Phase 2 of the railway system includes the Sheung Wan to Admiralty section, and Admiralty to North Point while Phase 8 will be from North Point to Chai Wan.[2] The plan still included the Sheung Wan to Kennedy Town section, but construction did not commence on that section of line.[2]
  2. ^ This causes the station to be very busy all day long.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "MTR system map" (PDF). MTR. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d "歷史". MTR之今昔Expo (in Cantonese). MTR之今昔. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  3. ^ a b c "歷史". 港島線 (in Cantonese). 台灣Word. 6 December 2013. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  4. ^ "Service Hours". Services and Facilities. MTR. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  5. ^ "Causeway Bay Station layout" (PDF). MTR Corporation. Retrieved 31 July 2014.
  6. ^ "銅鑼灣 Causeway Bay (CAB)". 港島線簡介 (in Cantonese). MTR之今昔. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  7. ^ a b c "Causeway Bay Station street map" (PDF). MTR Corporation. Retrieved 31 July 2014.

External linksEdit