Castilian Spanish

  (Redirected from Castilian language)

In English, Castilian Spanish can mean the variety of Peninsular Spanish spoken in northern and central Spain, the standard form of Spanish, or Spanish from Spain in general.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The International Phonetic Association defines Castilian Spanish as the formal Spanish spoken in Castile by educated speakers.[7] In Spanish, the term castellano (Castilian) refers to the Spanish language as a whole, or to the medieval Old Spanish, a predecessor to Early Modern Spanish.

TerminologyEdit

 
Map of languages and dialects in Spain

The term Castilian Spanish is used in English for the specific varieties of Spanish spoken in north and central Spain. Typically, it is more loosely used to denote the Spanish spoken in all of Spain as compared to Spanish spoken in Latin America. In Spain itself, Spanish is not a uniform language and there exist several different varieties of Spanish; in addition, there are other official and unofficial languages in the country; Spanish is official throughout Spain.

Castellano septentrional ("Northern Castilian") is the Spanish term for the dialects from the Northern half of Spain, including those from Aragón or Navarre, which were never part of Castile. Español castellano, the literal translation of Castilian Spanish, is not a common expression; it could refer to varieties found in the region of Castile; however, those varieties are not uniform either.

PhonologyEdit

GrammarEdit

  • A wide swath of central Castile is home to leísmo. The RAE considers leísmo to be incorrect, though it considers it to be admissible when referring to a single, male person.[15]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Random House Unabridged Dictionary. Random House Inc. 2006.
  2. ^ The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (4th ed.). Houghton Mifflin Company. 2006.
  3. ^ Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary. MICRA, Inc. 1998.
  4. ^ "Encarta World English Dictionary". Bloomsbury Publishing Plc. 2007. Archived from the original on 2009-10-31. Retrieved 2008-08-05.
  5. ^ "Castilian". Dictionary.com Unabridged (Online). n.d. Retrieved 2021-04-04.
  6. ^ "Castilian". Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary. Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 2021-04-04.
  7. ^ Martínez-Celdrán, Eugenio; Fernández-Planas, Ana María; Carrera-Sabaté, Josefina (December 2003). "Castilian Spanish". Journal of the International Phonetic Association. 33 (2): 255–259. doi:10.1017/S0025100303001373.
  8. ^ Molina Martos, Isabel (December 2016). "Variación de la -/d/ final de palabra en Madrid: ¿prestigio abierto o encubierto?". Boletín de filología (in Spanish). 51 (2): 347–367. doi:10.4067/S0718-93032016000200013.
  9. ^ García Mouton, Pilar; Molina Martos, Isabel (1 January 2016). "La –/d/ final en el atlas dialectal de Madrid (ADIM): un cambio en marcha". Lapurdum (in Spanish) (19): 283–296. doi:10.4000/lapurdum.3375.
  10. ^ Estrada Arráez, Ana (2012). "The Loss of Intervocalic and Final /d/ in the Iberian Peninsula" (PDF). Dialectologia. Special Issue III: 7–22. ISSN 2013-2247. Retrieved 25 January 2022.
  11. ^ Wright, Robyn (2017). The Madrileño ejke : a study of the perception and production of velarized /s/ in Madrid (PhD). The University of Texas at Austin. hdl:2152/60470. OCLC 993940787.
  12. ^ Klaus Kohler. "Castilian Spanish – Madrid".
  13. ^ Martnez-Celdrn, Eugenio; Fernndez-Planas, Ana Ma.; Carrera-Sabat, Josefina (December 2003). "Castilian Spanish". Journal of the International Phonetic Association. 33 (2): 255–259. doi:10.1017/S0025100303001373. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  14. ^ Dalbor, John B. (March 1980). "Observations on Present-Day Seseo and Ceceo in Southern Spain". Hispania. 63 (1): 5. doi:10.2307/340806. JSTOR 340806.
  15. ^ "Uso de los pronombres lo(s), la(s), le(s). Leísmo, laísmo, loísmo | Real Academia Española". www.rae.es (in Spanish).

SourcesEdit

External linksEdit