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Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley (UK Parliament constituency)

Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley was a county constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1983 until 2005. Half of the constituency was incorporated into the new Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock constituency, with the remainder incorporated into the new Central Ayrshire constituency and the expanded Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency.

Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley in Scotland for the 1997 general election
19832005
Number of membersOne
Replaced byAyr, Carrick & Cumnock
Central Ayrshire
Kilmarnock & Loudoun
Created fromAyr and South Ayrshire[1]

BoundariesEdit

1983-1997: Cumnock and Doon Valley District, and the Kyle and Carrick District electoral divisions of Annbank Mossblown and St Quivox, Carrick, and Coylton and Kincaidston.

1997-2005: Cumnock and Doon Valley District, and the Kyle and Carrick District electoral divisions of Ayr South Coylton and Annbank, and Carrick.

HistoryEdit

The Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley constituency was created as part of the Third Periodical Review of Parliamentary constituencies in 1983. It was a direct successor to the former South Ayrshire constituency which covered the modern electoral wards of Doon Valley, Cumnock & New Cumnock, Ballochmyle, Girvan & South Carrick and Maybole, North Carrick & Coylton alongside Annbank which forms part of the Kyle electoral ward.[2] The new constituency stretched across the former South Ayrshire constituency whilst also incorporating the council estate of Kincaidston in Ayr and a large, unpopulated section of Prestwick, east of Prestwick airport.[3]

Significant boundary change took place as part of the Fourth Periodical Review in time for the 1997 general election. Large swathes of the Ayr constituency were transferred to the Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley constituency, altering the demographic of both seats. The Conservative-voting suburbs of Alloway, Doonfoot, Castlehill, Masonhill and Holmston were incorporated into Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley alongside the council estates of south Belmont and part of Forehill. The east section of Prestwick which was previously contained within Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley was transferred back to Ayr.[4]

For the 2005 general election the Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley constituency was divided into three constituencies, with Mossblown, Annbank and St. Quivox forming part of the Central Ayrshire constituency alongside Irvine, Kyle, Prestwick, Troon and part of Ayr (Heathfield) and Kilwinning.[5] The Ballochmyle electoral ward was added to Kilmarnock and Loudoun[6] whilst the remainder of the constituency was joined to the Labour-Conservative marginal town of Ayr to form the Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock seat.[7] These boundaries currently remain in place today.

Constituency profile and voting patternsEdit

Members of ParliamentEdit

ElectionsEdit

 
South Ayrshire electoral history


Elections of the 1980sEdit

General election 1983: Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Co-op George Foulkes 21,394 51.5 N/A
Conservative James McInnes 10,024 24.1 N/A
Social Democratic Robert Logan 7,421 17.9 N/A
SNP Ron Wyllie 2,694 6.5 N/A
Majority 11,370 27.4 N/A
Turnout 41,533 74.3 N/A
Labour Co-op win (new seat)
General election 1987: Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Co-op George Foulkes 25,669 60.1 +8.6
Conservative Struan Stevenson 8,867 20.7 −3.4
Social Democratic Maryum Ali 4,106 9.6 −8.3
SNP Charles Calman 4,094 9.6 +3.1
Majority 16,802 39.3
Turnout 42,736 75.8 +1.5
Labour Co-op hold Swing +6.0

Elections of the 1990sEdit

General election 1992: Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Co-op George Foulkes 25,142 59.1 −1.0
Conservative James A.D. Boswell 8,516 20.0 −0.7
SNP Charles E. Douglas 6,910 16.2 +6.6
Liberal Democrat Mary C. Paris 2,005 4.7 −4.9
Majority 16,626 39.1
Turnout 42,573 76.9 +1.1
Labour Co-op hold Swing −0.2
General election 1997: Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Co-op George Foulkes 29,398 59.8 +5.8
Conservative Alistair J. Marshall 8,336 17.0 −8.7
SNP Christine Hutchison 8,190 16.7 +1.6
Liberal Democrat Derek G. Young 2,613 5.3 +0.1
Referendum John K. Higgins 634 1.3 N/A
Majority 21,062 42.8
Turnout 49,171 75.0 −1.9
Labour Co-op hold Swing

Elections of the 2000sEdit

General election 2001: Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Co-op George Foulkes 22,174 55.3 −4.5
Conservative Gordon Millar 7,318 18.2 +1.3
SNP Tom Wilson 6,258 15.6 −1.1
Liberal Democrat Rebecca Rodger 2,932 7.3 +2.0
Scottish Socialist Amanda McFarlane 1,058 2.6 N/A
Socialist Labour James McDaid 367 0.9 N/A
Majority 14,856 37.1
Turnout 40,107 61.8 −13.2
Labour Co-op hold Swing

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "'Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley', June 1983 up to May 1997". ElectionWeb Project. Cognitive Computing Limited. Archived from the original on 11 March 2016. Retrieved 10 March 2016.
  2. ^ 'Second Review of UK Parliament Constituencies (1969) South Ayrshire county constituency'
  3. ^ 'Third Review of UK Parliament Constituencies (1983 - 1997) Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley county constituency'
  4. ^ 'Fourth Review of UK Parliament Constituencies (1997-2005) Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley county constituency'
  5. ^ 'Boundary Commission for Scotland UK Parliament 2005 onwards Central Ayrshire county constituency'
  6. ^ http://www.bcomm-scotland.independent.gov.uk/includes/downloadfile.asp?file=/maps/westminster/2005/kilmarnock_and_loudoun.pdf[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ 'Boundary Commission for Scotland First Periodic Review of Scottish Parliament Boundaries Recommended Scottish Parliament constituencies Ayr County Constituency'
  8. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "A" (part 3)
  9. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "C" (part 3)
  10. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  11. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  12. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  13. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  14. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.