Carl R. Ice[3] is an American businessman. He has been the President of BNSF Railway from November 1, 2010,[4] and President and CEO since January 1, 2014,[1] succeeding Matthew K. Rose in the role.[5] At the end of 2020 Ice retired after 42 years with the company and was succeeded as President and CEO by Kathryn Farmer. He remains on the BNSF Railway board.[6]

Carl Ice
Born1956/1957 (age 64–65)
Alma materKansas State University
OccupationPresident and CEO of BNSF Railway
Notes

CareerEdit

Ice graduated from Kansas State University with a Bachelor's degree in industrial engineering and went to work in the Industrial Engineering Department for the Santa Fe Railroad. He subsequently held roles in the Operations, Finance, and Information Systems departments within the organization before named Vice President, Administration in 1992.

Ice was named Vice President, Carload Management in January, 1994, but was named Executive Vice President six months later.[7]

The Santa Fe merged with the Burlington Northern on September 22, 1995, though operations of the two railroads remained separate until December 31, 1996. Ice remained with the combined corporation, BNSF Railway, as Vice President and Chief Mechanical Officer. He was promoted to Senior Vice President of Operations in 1999, where he remained before assuming the company presidency in 2010.

Ice retired from BNSF at the end of 2020.

Personal lifeEdit

Carl Ice is married to Mary, who is also a Kansas State University graduate. They have two adult children, Marshall and Karen.

The Ice family has frequently donated to both Kansas State University and the Kansas State athletic department. The Ice family has establishes six scholarship funds, in the fields of engineering and human ecology, as well as a student award for campus broadcasting, a Deans excellence award, and a family emergency fund. In recognition of the family's philanthropy, the university's College of Health and Human Sciences dedicated the Carl and Mary Ice Hall in 2013.

On the athletics side, the training facility for the K-State men's and women's basketball programs was named for the Ice family in 2012. The four video boards at Bill Snyder Family Stadium are also named for the family.[8]

In December 2018, the Kansas Board of Regents approved the College of Engineering at Kansas State University to be named the Carl R. Ice College of Engineering in his honor.[9]

In June 2021, Ice was nominated by Kansas governor Laura Kelly to the Kansas Board of Regents, alongside Lawrence attorney and former Kansas state senator Wint Winter and former Kansas City, Kansas school district superintendent Cynthia Lane.[10] The following month, Ice was appointed to chair the committee conducting the Board's search for a new Kansas State University president, replacing the outgoing Richard Myers.

Business positions
Preceded by
New title
President of BNSF Railway
2010-2020
Succeeded by
Preceded by Chief Executive Officer of BNSF Railway
2014-2020
Awards
Preceded by Railroader of the Year
2016
Succeeded by
Tom Prendergast

References

  1. ^ a b "Carl Ice, BNSF Railway Co: Profile & Biography". Bloomberg. 2016-09-09. Retrieved 2016-09-20.
  2. ^ "Carl R. Ice: Executive Profile & Biography". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2016-09-20.
  3. ^ "About BNSF - Our People - Our Officers". BNSF. Retrieved 2016-09-20.
  4. ^ "Ice Named President, BNSF Railway Company" (Press release). Fort Worth, Texas. Business Wire. 2010-11-01. Retrieved 2016-09-20.
  5. ^ "BNSF Railway names Carl Ice CEO, replacing Matthew Rose". Reuters. 2013-12-11. Retrieved 2016-09-20.
  6. ^ Vantuono, William C. "BNSF's Katie Farmer Breaks Through the "Glass Ceiling"". Railway Age. Retrieved 3 October 2020.
  7. ^ "Carl R. Ice". engg.ksu.edu. Retrieved 2021-07-23.
  8. ^ "About Carl R. Ice". engg.ksu.edu. Retrieved 2021-07-23.
  9. ^ "K-State announces College of Engineering to be named for alumnus Carl R. Ice". www.ksufoundation.org. Retrieved 2019-02-12.
  10. ^ Staff reports. "Former BNSF CEO, K-State alum Carl Ice nominated for Kansas Board of Regents". The Mercury. Retrieved 2021-07-23.

External linksEdit