CardDAV

vCard Extensions to WebDAV (CardDAV) is an address book client/server protocol designed to allow users to access and share contact data on a server.

CardDAV
Communication protocol
OSI layerApplication
Port(s)80, 443
RFC(s)RFC 6352

The CardDAV protocol was developed by the IETF and was published as RFC 6352 in August 2011.[1] CardDAV is based on WebDAV, which is based on HTTP, and it uses vCard for contact data.[2]

HistoryEdit

CardDAV was proposed as an open standard for contact management in August 2011. It became known as a synchronization protocol in iOS 7, among other things, and is now also supported by Gmail, where it replaces the no longer supported ActiveSync standard.

In October 2013, the standard received an update that made it possible to capture higher-resolution contact images and achieve lower data consumption[3]

SpecificationEdit

The specification has been proposed as a standard by IETF as the RFC 6352 in August 2011 by C. Daboo from Apple Inc.

ImplementationsEdit

Server-sideEdit

The following products implement the server-side portion of the CardDAV protocol:

Client-sideEdit

The following products implement the client-side portion of the CardDAV protocol:

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "CardDAVResources". CalConnect. Archived from the original on 2010-04-02. Retrieved April 10, 2010.
  2. ^ "CardDAV: Related Standards". CalConnect. Archived from the original on 2010-04-02. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  3. ^ "Google updates CardDAV API". TheNextWeb. Retrieved October 22, 2013.
  4. ^ a b "Implementations: CardDAV Servers". CalConnect. Archived from the original on 2010-04-06. Retrieved April 10, 2010.
  5. ^ "Mac OS X Server: Address Book Server". Apple. Retrieved April 10, 2010.
  6. ^ "Install instructions of Baikal". Baikal. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  7. ^ "CommuniGate Pro support of CardDav". Retrieved April 21, 2011.
  8. ^ "DAViCal release 0.9.9.2". Freshmeat. Retrieved September 24, 2010.
  9. ^ Ellingson, Jeff (September 27, 2012). "A new way to sync Google Contacts". Google. Retrieved September 27, 2012.
  10. ^ Horde Groupware
  11. ^ "Documentation of Mailfence for CardDAV". Mailfence. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  12. ^ "Meishi". GitHub. Retrieved March 30, 2012.
  13. ^ Radicale
  14. ^ "SabreDAV 1.5 released with CardDAV support". dmfs. Archived from the original on September 26, 2011. Retrieved September 11, 2011.
  15. ^ "SOGo: Features". Inverse Inc. Archived from the original on 2013-03-05.
  16. ^ Yoon Lee, Jong (September 25, 2009). "Zimbra Server: CardDAV server". Zimbra/VMWare Inc. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  17. ^ AEM (September 2014). "Synology DSM: CardDAV server". SYNOLOGY.
  18. ^ "Xandikos: DAV Compliance".[permanent dead link]
  19. ^ "Implementations: CardDAV Clients". CalConnect. Archived from the original on 2011-07-30. Retrieved April 10, 2010.
  20. ^ Eran Dilger, Daniel (June 25, 2010). "iPhone 4 and iOS vs. Android: desktop and cloud services". AppleInsider. Archived from the original on July 30, 2010. Retrieved July 24, 2010.
  21. ^ "CalDAV/CardDAV for Android". Retrieved August 5, 2017.
  22. ^ "Using a CalDAV calendar". help.gnome.org. Retrieved 2019-02-28.
  23. ^ Koenig, Tobias (February 4, 2010). "CalDAV/CardDAV/GroupDAV Support for Akonadi". Blogspot. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  24. ^ "Kerio Connect". Kerio Technologies. Retrieved April 10, 2010.
  25. ^ "Outlook CalDav Synchronizer". Retrieved April 18, 2017.
  26. ^ "SOGo: Frontends". Inverse Inc. April 17, 2013. Archived from the original on October 5, 2013. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  27. ^ "CardBook :: Add-ons for Thunderbird". Retrieved June 30, 2016.

External linksEdit