Caravaggio, il pittore maledetto

  (Redirected from Caravaggio (1941 film))

Caravaggio, il pittore maledetto is a 1941 Italian historical drama film directed by Goffredo Alessandrini and starring Amedeo Nazzari, Clara Calamai and Lamberto Picasso. Nazzari portrays the painter Caravaggio as a wayward genius. It was one of his favourite screen roles.[2]

Caravaggio, il pittore maledetto
Directed byGoffredo Alessandrini
Produced byFrancesco Curato[1]
Screenplay by
Story by
  • Bruno Valeri
  • Vittorio Verga[1]
Starring
Music byRiccardo Zandonai[1]
Cinematography
Edited byGiancarlo Cappelli[1]
Production
company
Elica Film[1]
Distributed byMinerva Film
Release date
  • 6 February 1941 (1941-02-06) (Italy)
Running time
108 minutes[1]
CountryItaly[1]

Main castEdit

ProductionEdit

Screenwriter Riccardo Freda met Francesco Curato and parter of his Carbone, who were trying to produce a film on the Italian painter Caravaggio.[3] The budget of the film became higher and higher. It was shot in 1940 and was released the following year, making it the first film from Elica Film.[3] Freda is credited in the film as having "collaborated to the making of the film."[4] Besides working on the screenplay, Freda acted as the executive producer and worked on the art direction and created a maquette of the port of Ostia.[4]

The film starred Amedeo Nazzari was among Italy's most popular actors at the time and was conflicted with the role when his character Caravaggio did not embrace or kiss any woman in the film, which he thought would put his career at risk.[4]

ReleaseEdit

Caravaggio, il pittore maledetto was distributed theatrically in Italy by Minerva Film on 6 February 1941.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Curti 2017, p. 294.
  2. ^ Gundle, p. 192.
  3. ^ a b Curti 2017, p. 27.
  4. ^ a b c Curti 2017, p. 28.

BibliographyEdit

  • Curti, Roberto (2017). Riccardo Freda: The Life and Works of a Born Filmmaker. McFarland. ISBN 978-1476628387.
  • Gundle, Stephen (2013). Mussolini's Dream Factory: Film Stardom in Fascist Italy. Berghahn Books.

External linksEdit