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Capitol Heights, Maryland

Capitol Heights is a town in Prince George's County, Maryland, located on the border of both the Northeast & Southeast quadrants of Washington D.C. As a matter of fact, East Capitol Street (MD 214), which is a major street in Capitol Heights, happens to be the very street that evenly divides the Northeast & Southeast quadrants of Washington D.C., after leaving Capitol Heights, MD and entering Washington D.C. The town of Capitol Heights is officially bounded between Southern Avenue NE/SE to the north, Yost Place, and Eastern Avenue NE to the east, the Watts Branch Stream, Brooke Road, and Capitol Heights Boulevard to the south, and Marlboro Pike to the west. The zipcode of Capitol Heights is 20743. Though Capitol Heights itself is an incorporated town in Prince George's County, Maryland, residents and businesses located in unincorporated towns either nearby, or on the border of Capitol Heights, such as Coral Hills, Walker Mill, Pepper Mill Village, Carmody Hills, Fairmount Heights, and Chapel Oaks, are assigned Capitol Heights addresses, in addition to the Capitol Heights zipcode of 20743, even though they are not located within the official neighborhood boundaries of Capitol Heights and happen to already be their own separate neighborhoods.

Capitol Heights, Maryland
Location of Capitol Heights, Maryland
Location of Capitol Heights, Maryland
Coordinates: 38°52′55″N 76°54′52″W / 38.88194°N 76.91444°W / 38.88194; -76.91444Coordinates: 38°52′55″N 76°54′52″W / 38.88194°N 76.91444°W / 38.88194; -76.91444
Country United States of America
State Maryland
County Prince George's
Incorporated1910[1]
Area
 • Total0.78 sq mi (2.02 km2)
 • Land0.78 sq mi (2.02 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
121 ft (37 m)
Population
 • Total4,337
 • Estimate 
(2018)[4]
4,524
 • Density5,829.71/sq mi (2,251.45/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
20700-20799
Area code(s)301 and 240
FIPS code24-13000
GNIS feature ID0597177
Websitewww.capitolheightsmd.com

Bordering areasEdit

GeographyEdit

Capitol Heights is located at 38°52′55″N 76°54′52″W / 38.88194°N 76.91444°W / 38.88194; -76.91444 (38.881862, -76.914474).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.80 square miles (2.07 km2), all of it land.[6]

HistoryEdit

In 1904, Washington, D.C., was growing by leaps and bounds. The overcrowding and the improved public transportation made the idea of living on the outskirts increasingly appealing to people looking for housing. Recognizing the opportunity, Baltimore resident Otway B. Zantzinger acquired 400 hilly acres just beyond the eastern corner of the District of Columbia. He divided the tract into 4,000 lots and began to sell them at prices ranging from $20 to $150 each. He advertised a picturesque view of Washington, D.C., a proposed electric railway, drinking water from crystal-clear springs, nothing down and a dollar a month, no interest, no landlords, and, in the custom and vernacular of the times, "no colored people." Many buyers bought two lots in this haven that was to become Capitol Heights.

While awaiting their "proposed electric railway," commuters to the city could walk about a mile (often through mud) to the District Line station at what is now Seat Pleasant and board a rail car into Washington, DC.

the absence of paved roads, sidewalks, street lights, and other public services, including the electric railway, began to cast a pall over Zantzinger's vision of bliss. In 1910, the approximately 200 householders voted to incorporate their community as Capitol Heights. Over the next 50 years, the town made strides in improving its infrastructure and services. It established its own fire department and public works department and built facilities to house them and other elements of the government. By the 1970s, when its population had reached about 3,800, the town's central business district had started to decline.

In 1980, that long-promised "electric railway" finally arrived. Capitol Heights got its own station on the Washington Metro Blue Line, providing easy access to the entire metropolitan region and national transportation facilities. The land around the station has been declared an Enterprise Zone, which the town is promoting as one of its paths to restoring prosperity. Today, over 90% of the population of Capitol Heights is African American Template:Http://www.city-data.com/city/Capitol-Heights-Maryland.html and the town has had four African-American mayors.[7]

Previous mayorsEdit

  • 1946-1950 Thomas A. Shaw
  • 1950-1952 Harvey E. Ennis
  • 1952-1954 Joseph Gainer
  • 1954-1964 Elmer L. Hockman
  • 1964-1986 Leo P. Forami
  • 1986-2002 Vivian M. Dodson
  • 2002-2006 Joyce Ayers Nixon
  • 2006-2010 Darrell A. Miller
  • 2010-2014 Kito James
  • 2014-2018 Marnitta L. King

Town councilEdit

  • Shawn Maldon, Mayor
  • Rhonda Akers, Councilwoman
  • Caroline Brown, Councilwoman
  • Renita A. Cason, Councilwoman
  • Latonya Chew, Councilwoman
  • Faith Ford, Councilwoman
  • Elaine Williams, Councilwoman

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
19201,194
19301,61134.9%
19402,03626.4%
19502,72934.0%
19603,13815.0%
19703,83522.2%
19803,271−14.7%
19903,63311.1%
20004,13813.9%
20104,3374.8%
Est. 20184,524[4]4.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]

2010 censusEdit

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 4,337 people, 1,482 households, and 1,040 families residing in the town. The population density was 5,421.3 inhabitants per square mile (2,093.2/km2). There were 1,622 housing units at an average density of 2,027.5 per square mile (782.8/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 3.3% White, 91.3% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 3.1% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.4% of the population.

There were 1,482 households of which 42.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.0% were married couples living together, 28.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 29.8% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.48.

The median age in the town was 34.9 years. 27.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.3% were from 25 to 44; 26.1% were from 45 to 64; and 9.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 46.0% male and 54.0% female.

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 4,138 people, 1,441 households, and 1,014 families residing in the town. The population density was 5,047.3 people per square mile (1,948.4/km²). There were 1,603 housing units at an average density of 1,955.2 per square mile (754.8/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 92.85% Black or African American, 4.81% White, 0.27% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.36% from other races, and 1.35% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.87% of the population.

There were 1,441 households out of which 37.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.2% were married couples living together, 28.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.6% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.41.

In the town, the population was spread out with 30.8% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 32.6% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 8.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $46,667, and the median income for a family was $53,826. Males had a median income of $36,950 versus $35,225 for females. The per capita income for the town was $18,932. About 9.3% of families and 11.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.8% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

GovernmentEdit

The Town of Capitol Heights operates under the council-manager form of government. The Town Administrator serves as chief administrative officer and directly reports to the Town Council. The Town has approximately 20.0 FTE (full-time equivalents) who serve in the following areas:

  • Jason Small, Esq., Town Administrator
  • Bandele McQueen, Esq., Assistant Town Administrator
  • Community Relations and Outreach
  • Economic Development
  • Finance Department
  • Human Resources
  • Neighborhood Services Department
  • Police Department
  • Recreational Department
  • Town Clerk (Business License and Permitting)

[10]

The U.S. Postal Service operates the Capitol Heights Post Office.[11]

Law enforcementEdit

Capitol Heights is served by its own police department. Chief Mark W. Cummings serve as the Chief of Police.[12]

Prince George's County Police Department District 3 Station in Landover CDP serves the community.[13]

TransportationEdit

 
MD 214, the largest highway in Capitol Heights

The primary highway serving Capitol Heights is Maryland Route 214. MD 214 extends west to Washington, D.C. (connecting with East Capitol Street) and east to Interstate 95/Interstate 495 (Capital Beltway). Maryland Route 332 also serves Capitol Heights, following an old alignment of MD 214.

Community organizationsEdit

The Capitol Heights/Seat Pleasant chapter of the Prince George's County Boys and Girls Club, supports the youth with after-school programs and athletic programs, along with mentoring boys and girls.

The Capitol Heights conflict-mediation program focuses on resolving differences between youths in the area.

EducationEdit

Capitol Heights is a part of the Prince George's County Public Schools system. Residential areas of Capitol Heights are zoned to the following schools:[14] Zoned elementary schools for the municipal limits are Capitol Heights, William Hall, and Doswell Brooks.[15] William Hall and Walker Mill middle schools serve sections of the municipality.[16] Central High School and Suitland High School serve sections of the municipality.[17]

Notable peopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Capitol Heights". Maryland Manual. Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  2. ^ "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jan 2, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-02. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  7. ^ "History - Capitol Heights, MD". www.capitolheightsmd.gov.
  8. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  10. ^ "Administration - Capitol Heights, MD". www.capitolheightsmd.gov.
  11. ^ "CAPITOL HEIGHTS." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on September 11, 2018. "6089 CENTRAL AVE CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743-9997"
  12. ^ "Police Department - Capitol Heights, MD". www.capitolheightsmd.gov.
  13. ^ "District 3 Station - Landover." Prince George's County Police Department. Retrieved on September 9, 2018. " 7600 Barlowe Road Landover, MD 20785 ". Beat map. See 2010 U.S. Census Map of Landover CDP.
  14. ^ "2010 CENSUS - CENSUS BLOCK MAP: Capitol Heights town, MD." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on August 31, 2018. - Residential areas are marked here: "Residential Land Use. Existing Conditions 2.5." In: "THE TOWN OF CAPITOL HEIGHTS COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY PLAN 2011-2016." Capitol Heights, Maryland. PDF p. 14/15. Retrieved on August 31, 2018.
  15. ^ "NEIGHBORHOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2018-2019." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on August 31, 2018.
  16. ^ "NEIGHBORHOOD MIDDLE SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2018-2019." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on August 31, 2018.
  17. ^ "NEIGHBORHOOD HIGH SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2018-2019." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on August 31, 2018.
  18. ^ "Chad Scott". databaseFootball.com. Archived from the original on September 5, 2012. Retrieved November 6, 2012.
  19. ^ "Henry A. McKelvey (Inventor)". city-data.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  20. ^ "Henry A. McKelvey (Educator)". potomac.edu. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  21. ^ Former Negro League baseball player is living history. Article by Natalie McGill. Gazette Stories. Retrieved on February 17, 2019.

External linksEdit