Canfield, Ohio

Canfield is a city in central Mahoning County, Ohio, United States. A suburb 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Youngstown, Canfield is located at the intersection of U.S. Route 224 and U.S. Route 62 in Canfield Township and is part of the greater Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.[6] The population was 7,699 as of the 2020 census.[3] In 2005, Canfield was rated the 82nd best place to live in the United States by Money magazine.[7]

Canfield, Ohio
City of Canfield
The original Mahoning County Courthouse in Canfield.
The original Mahoning County Courthouse in Canfield.
Location of Canfield, Ohio
Location of Canfield, Ohio
Location of Canfield in Mahoning County
Location of Canfield in Mahoning County
Coordinates: 41°1′47″N 80°45′56″W / 41.02972°N 80.76556°W / 41.02972; -80.76556Coordinates: 41°1′47″N 80°45′56″W / 41.02972°N 80.76556°W / 41.02972; -80.76556
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyMahoning
Government
 • MayorRichard A. Duffet
 • City ManagerWade Calhoun
Area
 • Total4.63 sq mi (11.98 km2)
 • Land4.60 sq mi (11.91 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.07 km2)
Elevation1,145 ft (349 m)
Population
 • Total7,699
 • Density1,662.85/sq mi (642.65/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
44406-1257
Area code(s)234/330
FIPS code39-11360[5]
GNIS feature ID1038796[2]
Websitehttp://www.ci.canfield.oh.us/

HistoryEdit

Canfield Township was established in 1798 as Campfield, township number 1 in range 3 by the purchase from the Connecticut Land Company in the Connecticut Western Reserve.[8] It was purchased by six men, although the majority was owned by Judson Canfield, a land agent.[9] The township took his name in 1800. Canfield's first settlers arrived shortly after surveying was initiated in 1798, primarily from Connecticut, although waves of German immigrants around 1805 and Irish around 1852 would occur.[8] Goods were transported initially by horse and wagon about 55 miles (91 km) from Pittsburgh; later, the Beaver Canal served as the primary method for commerce. By 1805, Canfield had approximately 17 homes, a store and a school; it became a trade center for the region.[8]

Canfield was part of Trumbull County until 1846, when the counties in the area were redefined and Mahoning County emerged as a new county. Canfield was made the county seat in 1846, incorporating in 1849, igniting a three decade long feud with Youngstown on which should be the seat.[10][11] The Ohio State Legislature voted to move the seat to Youngstown in 1874.[8] Canfield experienced a lot of growth during its tenure, and would slow down following removal of the courthouse, becoming the center of a farming community.[8]

Canfield is home to many examples of classic revival architecture.[8]

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.61 square miles (11.94 km2), of which 4.58 square miles (11.86 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[12] It is surrounded by Canfield Township.

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850527
186064923.1%
1870640−1.4%
18806501.6%
18906753.8%
1900672−0.4%
19106851.9%
192080617.7%
19301,01525.9%
19401,14112.4%
19501,46528.4%
19603,252122.0%
19704,99753.7%
19805,53510.8%
19905,409−2.3%
20007,37436.3%
20107,5151.9%
20207,6992.4%
Sources:[13][14][15][16][17][18][5]

2010 censusEdit

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 7,515 people, 3,073 households, and 2,196 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,640.8 inhabitants per square mile (633.5/km2). There were 3,306 housing units at an average density of 721.8 per square mile (278.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.4% White, 0.4% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.8% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.5% of the population.

There were 3,073 households, of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.7% were married couples living together, 8.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 28.5% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.96.

The median age in the city was 45.8 years. 23.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 19.4% were from 25 to 44; 32.1% were from 45 to 64; and 19% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.0% male and 52.0% female.

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 7,374 people, 2,917 households, and 2,143 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,588.1 people per square mile (613.6/km2). There were 3,043 housing units at an average density of 655.4 per square mile (253.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.27% White, 1.29% Asian, 0.45% African American, 0.04% Native American, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.84% of the population.

There were 2,917 households, out of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.0% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.5% were non-families. 24.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the city the population was spread out, with 25.6% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 24.1% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.3 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $59,434 and the median income for a family was $71,484. Males had a median income of $35,346 versus $20,493 for females. The per capita income for the city is $31,756. About 2.1% of the families and 3.2% of the population live below the poverty line. Including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those 65 years of age or older.

GovernmentEdit

Canfield operates under a chartered council–manager government, where there are four council members elected as a legislature for 4-year terms in addition to a mayor, who serves as an executive.[19] The council employs a city manager for administration. The current mayor is Richard A. Duffett, and the current city manager is Wade Calhoun.[19]

Arts and cultureEdit

A branch of the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County is located in Canfield.[20] Canfield is also home to the War Vet Museum,[21] the farm of Loghurst,[22] and the Idora Park Experience, a museum about the former Youngstown amusement park.[23]

GovernmentEdit

In the Ohio General Assembly, Canfield is located in the 33rd Senate District, represented by Michael Rulli (R),[24] and in the 59th State Representative District, represented by Al Cutrona (R).[25] Federally, Canfield is located in Ohio's 6th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of R+16[26] and is represented by Republican Bill Johnson.[27]

EducationEdit

Public schools in Canfield include:

  • Hilltop Elementary (grade K-4), built in 1972.
  • C.H. Campbell (grades K-4), built in 1960.
  • Canfield Village Middle School (grade 5–8), built in 1903, is Canfield's oldest school building.
  • Canfield High School (9-12), built in 1984.[28][5]

Notable peopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ a b "QuickFacts: Canfield city, Ohio". census.gov. Retrieved 2021-09-13.
  4. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  5. ^ a b c d "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ https://canfieldtownship.org/
  7. ^ "Money Magazine: Best Places to Live 2005". Money Magazine. 2005. Retrieved August 11, 2011.
  8. ^ a b c d e f "History of Canfield - City of Canfield". Retrieved 2021-09-13.
  9. ^ Overman, William Daniel (1958). Ohio Town Names. Akron, OH: Atlantic Press. p. 23.
  10. ^ Sanderson, Thomas W. (1907). Twentieth Century History of Youngstown and Mahoning County. Biographical Publishing Company. pp. 184.
  11. ^ "Courthouse History | Mahoning County, OH".
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-14. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  13. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Ninth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. 1870. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  14. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. 1880. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  15. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  16. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  17. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. 1960. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  18. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  19. ^ a b "Meet the Council - City of Canfield". Retrieved 2021-09-13.
  20. ^ "Locations & Hours". Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  21. ^ http://www.warvetmuseum.org/
  22. ^ https://loghurst.org/
  23. ^ https://theidoraparkexperience.com/
  24. ^ "Senator Michael A Rulli | Ohio Senate". Ohio Senate. State of Ohio. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  25. ^ "Representative Don Manning (R) - 59th District". Ohio House of Representatives. State of Ohio. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  26. ^ "Introducing the 2017 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. Cook Political Report. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  27. ^ "Congressman Bill Johnson | Representing the 6th District of Ohio". Congressman Bill Johnson. US House of Representatives. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  28. ^ "Canfield Chooses New Superintendent". The Town Crier. Retrieved 19 April 2013.

External linksEdit