Open main menu

State Route 34 (SR 34) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California. It runs through Ventura County from Rice Avenue in Oxnard to State Route 118 in Somis.

State Route 34 marker

State Route 34
SR 34 highlighted in red
Route information
Defined by Streets and Highways Code § 334
Maintained by Caltrans
Length13.368 mi[1] (21.514 km)
Major junctions
West endRice Avenue in Oxnard
  US 101 in Camarillo
East end SR 118 at Somis
Location
CountiesVentura
Highway system
SR 33SR 35

Contents

Route descriptionEdit

SR 34 is part of the California Freeway and Expressway System,[2] and portions of the route in Oxnard and Camarillo are part of the National Highway System,[3] a network of highways that are considered essential to the country's economy, defense, and mobility by the Federal Highway Administration.[4]

It starts on the west at the intersection of Rice Avenue[5] and Fifth Street in Oxnard. It continues east then northeast on Fifth Street until it intersects Pleasant Valley Road in Camarillo. After continuing east on Pleasant Valley Road a short distance, it turns north onto Lewis Road until the intersection with Las Posas Road at the north city limit of Camarillo where Route 34 continues straight ahead as Somis Road. It ends at Route 118 near Somis. This route originally began in Port Hueneme, but in 1965, the portion from Port Hueneme to Route 1 was deleted. Nevertheless, Route 34 mileposts add on these additional 4 miles (6.4 km) along the signed route.

The route parallels the Southern Pacific Coast Line, which carries Coast Starlight, Pacific Surfliner and Metrolink Ventura County Line passenger trains, for almost its entire current length.

HistoryEdit

In 1933, a road from Hueneme to near Somis, going through Oxnard and Camarillo, was added to the state highway system.[6] This road was numbered as Route 153 in 1935.[7] In the 1964 state highway renumbering, SR 34 was defined with this routing, ending at SR 118 on the eastern side.[8] In 1965, the highway from Port Hueneme to SR 1 was removed from the state highway system.[9] The part of the highway in Oxnard was authorized by the state legislature to be turned over to the city of Oxnard in 2008.[10]

FutureEdit

According to the 2017 Caltrans District 7 Transportation Concept Report for State Route 34[11], State Route 34 is on the list of routes recommended for relinquishment.

Major intersectionsEdit

Except where prefixed with a letter, postmiles were measured on the road as it was in 1964, based on the alignment that existed at the time, and do not necessarily reflect current mileage. R reflects a realignment in the route since then, M indicates a second realignment, L refers an overlap due to a correction or change, and T indicates postmiles classified as temporary (for a full list of prefixes, see the list of postmile definitions).[1] Segments that remain unconstructed or have been relinquished to local control may be omitted. The entire route is in Ventura County.

LocationPostmile
[1][12][11]
DestinationsNotes
Oxnard6.27   To SR 1 / US 101 / Rice AvenueFuture SR 1; west end of state maintenance
10.43   To SR 1 / US 101 / Las Posas Road – Camarillo, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, CSU Channel Islands
Camarillo12.78  To US 101 south / Lewis Road, Pleasant Valley Road – Point Mugu, CSU Channel Islands
13.60  US 101 (Ventura Freeway) – Ventura, Los AngelesInterchange
Somis17.66  SR 118 (Los Angeles Avenue) – Ventura, San FernandoEast end of SR 34
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c California Department of Transportation. "State Truck Route List". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (XLS file) on June 30, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  2. ^ "Article 2 of Chapter 2 of Division 1 of the California Streets and Highways Code". Sacramento: California Office of Legislative Counsel. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  3. ^ Federal Highway Administration (March 25, 2015). National Highway System: Oxnard, CA (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  4. ^ Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike & Adderly, Kevin (June 20, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
  5. ^ "California Street and Highway Codes Division 1 Chapter 2 Article 3 Section 334". California Legislative Information. 1 January 2015. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  6. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to amend sections 2, 3 and 5 and to add two sections to be numbered 6 and 7 to an act entitled 'An act to provide for the acquisition of rights of way for and the construction, maintenance..." Fiftieth Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 767 p. 2034–2042.
  7. ^ California State Assembly. "An act...relating to State highways". Fifty-first Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 274.
  8. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to add Section 253 and Article 3 (commencing with Section 300) to Chapter 2 of Division 1 of, and to repeal Section 253 and Article 3 (commencing with Section 300) of Chapter 2 of Division 1 of, the..." 1963 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 385 p. 1182.
  9. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to amend Sections 253, 307, 317, 322, 334, 342, 347, 349, 361, 363, 372, 373, 374, 379, 384, 390, 407, 408, 443, 455, 470, 486, 514, 517, 548, and 550 of, to add Sections 556, 557, 558, 560..." 1965 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 1372.
  10. ^ California State Assembly. " Session of the Legislature". Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 717.
  11. ^ a b Transportation Concept Report State Route 34. Caltrans District 7. June 2017. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  12. ^ California Department of Transportation (July 2007). "Log of Bridges on State Highways". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation.

External linksEdit