Cabinet of Tomás Monje

Tomás Monje assumed office as the interim 41st President of Bolivia on 17 August 1946, and his mandate ended on 10 March 1947. The President of the Superior District Court of La Paz, Monje was chosen to lead an interim junta following the violent overthrow of President Gualberto Villarroel on 21 July 1946. Having been ill at the time, Monje only assumed the position 27 days later, chairing the junta until new elections could be held.

Monje cabinet
Bandera de Bolivia (Estado).svg
113th Cabinet of the Republic of Bolivia
1946–1947
Tomás Monje
Date formed17 August 1946 (1946-08-17)
Date dissolved10 March 1947 (1947-03-10)
People and organisations
PresidentTomás Monje
Vice PresidentVacant
No. of ministers7 (on 10 March 1947)
Total no. of members8 (including former members)
Member partyCaretaker government
History
PredecessorCabinet of Néstor Guillén (interim)
SuccessorCabinet of Enrique Hertzog

Monje formed one cabinet nine days after taking office, constituting the 113th national cabinet of Bolivia as part of the 1946–1947 Government Junta.[1]

Cabinet MinistersEdit

 
Cabinet of Bolivia
Interim Presidency of Tomás Monje, 1946–1947
Office Minister Party Prof. Term Days N.C[a] P.C[b]
President Tomás Monje Ind. Mag. 17 August 1946 – 10 March 1947 205
Vice President Office vacant throughout presidency
Secretary-General of the Junta Roberto Bilbao la Vieja[c] Law. 24 July 1946 – 10 March 1947 216 112[d] 1[e]
Minister of Foreign Affairs
and Worship

(Chancellor)
Aniceto Solares[3] PRG Dip. 24 July 1946 – 7 March 1947 226 112[d] 1[e]
Office vacant 7 March 1947 – 10 March 1947 113 1
Minister of Government
and Justice
Office vacant 26 August 1946 – 10 March 1947 113 1
Minister of National Defense Julio César Canelas 26 August 1946 – 10 March 1947 196 113 1
Minister of Economy Eduardo Saenz García[f] PSD Law. 26 August 1946 – 10 March 1947 196 113 1
Minister of Public Works
and Communications
Carlos Muñoz Roldán 26 August 1946 – 10 March 1947 196 113 1
Minister of Work, Health,
and Social Security
Aurelio Alcoba PIR Uni. 24 July 1946 – 10 March 1947 229 112[d] 1[e]
Minister of Education,
Fine Arts, and Indigenous Affairs
Manuel Elías P.[5] Mus. 26 August 1946 – 10 March 1947 196 113 1
Minister of Agriculture,
Livestock, and
Colonization
José Saavedra Suárez PSU 26 August 1946 – 14 May 1947 261 113 1[g]

CompositionEdit

 
President Monje with members of ministerial cabinet in 1947

All previous members of the cabinet of Néstor Guillén including Guillén himself remained in office upon the assumption of Monje as interim president. They were dismissed when Monje formed his own cabinet on 26 August, with the exception of Secretary-General Roberto Bilbao la Vieja, Foreign Minister Aniceto Solares, and Minister of Work and Social Security Aurelio Alcoba who remained in their positions for the duration of Monje's mandate.[1] The newly appointed members were Julio César Canelas (Defense), Eduardo Saenz García (Economy), Carlos Muñoz Roldán (Public Works), Manuel Elías P. (Education), and José Saavedra Suárez (Agriculture).

The civil junta and Monje's mandate ended on 10 March 1947 upon the inauguration of Enrique Hertzog, the winner of the 1947 general elections.

GalleryEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Denoting which national cabinet the minister was originally a part of.
  2. ^ Denoting which presidential cabinet the minister was originally a part of.
  3. ^ Acting Foreign Minister in the absence of Aniceto Solares from 27 August to 2 September 1946.[2]
  4. ^ a b c Originally a member of the 112th national cabinet of Bolivia.
  5. ^ a b c Originally a member of the Guillén ministerial cabinet.
  6. ^ Acting Foreign Minister in the absence of Aniceto Solares from 28 October to 12 November 1946 and 17 January to 7 March 1947.[4]
  7. ^ Held over into the Hertzog cabinet.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Gisbert 2003, pp. 346–349
  2. ^ "canciller". archive.vn. 19 February 2013. Archived from the original on 19 February 2013. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  3. ^ "canciller". archive.vn. 19 February 2013. Archived from the original on 19 February 2013. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  4. ^ "canciller". archive.vn. 19 February 2013. Archived from the original on 19 February 2013. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  5. ^ Mamani, Elías Blanco (25 October 2011). "DICCIONARIO CULTURAL BOLIVIANO: MANUEL ELIAS CORONEL PONCE". DICCIONARIO CULTURAL BOLIVIANO. Retrieved 9 February 2021.

BibliographyEdit