Cabinet of Jorge Quiroga

Jorge Quiroga assumed office as the 62nd President of Bolivia on 7 August 2001, and his term ended on 6 August 2002. Having previously served as vice president, Quiroga assumed the presidency after the resignation for health reasons of President Hugo Banzer, and was tasked with fulfilling the final 364 days of Banzer's term.

Quiroga cabinet
Bandera de Bolivia (Estado).svg
Cabinet of the Republic of Bolivia
2001–2002
Jorge Quiroga
Date formed7 August 2001 (2001-08-07)
Date dissolved6 August 2002 (2002-08-06)
People and organisations
PresidentJorge Quiroga
Vice PresidentVacant
No. of ministers15 (on 6 August 2002)
Total no. of members20 (including former members)
Member partiesNationalist Democratic Action (ADN)
Revolutionary Left Movement (MIR)
Solidarity Civic Unity (UCS)
Status in legislatureMinority coalition government
History
Legislature term(s)1997–2002
PredecessorCabinet of Hugo Banzer
SuccessorCabinet of Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada

The majority of the fourth Banzer ministerial cabinet, save for two ministers, resigned along with Banzer on 7 August 2001 allowing Jorge Quiroga to form his first ministerial cabinet the following day on 8 August.[1] Quiroga would form his second cabinet on 5 March 2002.[2] Quiroga's first and second ministerial cabinets comprised the 202nd and 203rd national cabinets of Bolivia.

Cabinet MinistersEdit

 
Cabinet of Bolivia
Presidency of Jorge Quiroga, 2001–2002
Office Minister Party Prof. Term Days N.C[a] P.C[b]
President Jorge Quiroga ADN Eng. 7 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 364
Vice President Office vacant throughout presidency
Minister of Foreign Affairs
and Worship

(Chancellor)
Gustavo Fernández Saavedra[3] MIR Law. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister of the Presidency José Luis Lupo Flores[4] Ind. Eco. 8 August 2001 – 5 March 2002 209 202 1
Alberto Leytón Avilés Eng. 5 March 2002 – 6 August 2002 154 203 2
Minister of Government Leopoldo Fernández ADN 8 August 2001 – 5 March 2002 209 202 1
José Luis Lupo Flores Ind. Eco. 5 March 2002 – 6 August 2002 154 203 2
Minister of National Defense Oscar Guilarte ADN Mil. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister of Finance Jacques Trigo Loubiere Ind. Eco. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister of Economic Development Carlos Kempff Bruno Ind. Eco. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister of Housing and Basic Services Javier Nogales UCS Eco. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister of Sustainable Development,
Planning, and Environment
Ramiro Cavero Ind. Eco. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister of Justice
and Human Rights
Mario Serrate Ruíz ADN Law. 8 August 2001 – 5 March 2002 209 202 1
Carlos Alberto Goitia Caballero Law. 5 March 2002 – 6 August 2002 154 203 2
Minister of Work and Micro-Enterprise Jorge Pacheco Franco UCS 20 October 2000 – 13 December 2001 419 201[c] 4[d]
Juan Chahín Lupo[5] Law. 14 December 2001 – 6 August 2002 235 202 1
Minister of Health and Social Security Enrique Paz Argandoña MIR Dr. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister of Education, Culture, and Sports Amalia Anaya Jaldin[6] ADN Soc. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister of Agriculture, Livestock,
and Rural Development
Walter Nuñez-Rodriguez[7] Ind. Eco. 8 August 2001 – 6 August 2002 363 202 1
Minister Without Portfolio Responsible for
Government Information
Mauro Bertero Gutiérrez ADN 8 August 2001 – 5 March 2002 209 202 1
Hernán Terrazas 5 March 2002 – 6 August 2002 154 203 2
Minister Without Portfolio Responsible for
Peasant Affairs and Indigenous Peoples
Wigberto Ribero Pinto MIR 30 October 2000 – 5 March 2002 491 201[c] 4[d]
Tomasa Yarhui MBL Law. 5 March 2002 – 6 August 2002 154 203 2

CompositionEdit

The composition of Quiroga's first cabinet was described as "mixed" by ANF.[8] Of the 15 ministers, six were "pseudo-independents". Minister of the Presidency José Luis Lupo Flores was an independent with links to the Revolutionary Left Movement (MIR) while Finance Minister Jacques Trigo Loubiere had been Superintendent of Banks for the Revolutionary Nationalist (MNR) government of Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada. Ministers Carlos Kempff Bruno, Walter Nuñez-Rodriguez, and Ramiro Cavero were new political figures though with noted inclinations towards Quiroga's Nationalsit Democratic Action (ADN) party.

The remaining ministers were predominantly members of either the ADN or MIR which had been political allies since the mid-1980s. Minister of Health Enrique Paz Argandoña was notably the nephew of former MIR President Jaime Paz Zamora.[8] Leopoldo Fernández had been President of the Chamber of Senators prior to his appointment as Minister of Government. The Quiroga cabinet was also significant in that many political "dinosaurs" were relieved of their positions in favor of younger ministers. Among ADN officials, it was commented that the "withdrawal of the dinos is total" as the only remaining so-called dino was Minister of Justice Mario Serrate who at any time could be (and indeed in 2002 was) removed by Quiroga.

The appointment of Tomasa Yarhui as Minister Without Portfolio Responsible for Peasant Affairs and Indigenous Peoples as part of the second Quiroga cabinet was of particular note due to the fact that Yarhui was the first indigenous government minister in Bolivian history.[9] Yarhui would by Quiroga's running mate in his second attempt to win a full term during the 2014 general elections.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Denoting which national cabinet the minister was originally a part of.
  2. ^ Denoting which presidential cabinet the minister was originally a part of.
  3. ^ a b Originally a member of the 201st national cabinet of Bolivia.
  4. ^ a b Originally a member of the fourth Banzer ministerial cabinet.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Gaceta Oficial del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia". www.gacetaoficialdebolivia.gob.bo. Retrieved 23 January 2021.
  2. ^ "Gaceta Oficial del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia". www.gacetaoficialdebolivia.gob.bo. Retrieved 23 January 2021.
  3. ^ "canciller". archive.vn. 19 February 2013. Retrieved 18 February 2021.
  4. ^ "José Luis Lupo Flores | IADB". www.iadb.org. Retrieved 23 January 2021.
  5. ^ "Gaceta Oficial del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia". www.gacetaoficialdebolivia.gob.bo. Retrieved 23 January 2021.
  6. ^ "Bolivia Ministers". guide2womenleaders.com. Retrieved 23 January 2021.
  7. ^ "Walter Nuñez-Rodriguez". Chemonics International. Retrieved 23 January 2021.
  8. ^ a b "Gabinete de "Tuto" es mixto". Noticiasfides (ANF). 8 August 2001.
  9. ^ Mendoza, Luz. "Tuto aspira a la segunda vuelta con respaldo de Tomasa Yarhui". eju.tv (in Spanish). Retrieved 23 January 2021.

BibliographyEdit