COVID-19 pandemic in the Central African Republic

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Central African Republic is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the Central African Republic in March 2020.

COVID-19 pandemic in the Central African Republic
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationCentral African Republic
First outbreakWuhan, China
Index caseBangui
Arrival date14 March 2020
(1 year, 7 months, 1 week and 3 days)
Confirmed cases11,371 (as of 1 Oct)[1]
Active cases4,412 (as of 1 Oct)
Recovered6,859 (as of 1 Oct)
Deaths
100 (as of 1 Oct)
COVID-19-Pandemie - CF (Zentralafrikanische Republik) - Infizierte (800px).svg

BackgroundEdit

On 12 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that a novel coronavirus was the cause of a respiratory illness in a cluster of people in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, which was reported to the WHO on 31 December 2019.[2][3]

The case fatality ratio for COVID-19 has been much lower than SARS of 2003,[4][5] but the transmission has been significantly greater, with a significant total death toll.[6][4] Model-based simulation for the Central African Republic indicate that the 95% confidence interval for the time-varying reproduction number R t has been stable below 1.0 since June 2020.[7]

There are only three ventilators in the entire country.[8]

TimelineEdit

March 2020Edit

The country's first case was announced on 14 March, with the patient being identified as a 74-year-old Italian man who returned to the Central African Republic from Milan, Italy.[9]

There were six confirmed cases in March, with no recoveries and no deaths.[10]

April 2020Edit

In April there were 44 new cases, raising the total number of cases to 50. Ten patients recovered, leaving 40 active cases at the end of the month.[11]

May 2020Edit

On 23 May 2020, the first death in the country occurred.[12]

There were 961 new cases in May, raising the total number of cases to 1011. The death toll was 2 while the number of recovered patients increased to 23, leaving 986 active cases at the end of May.[13]

June 2020Edit

In June there were 2734 new cases, bringing the total number of cases to 3745. The death toll rose to 47. The number of recovered patients increased to 787, leaving 2911 active cases at the end of the month.[14]

July 2020Edit

There were 863 new cases in July, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 4608. The death toll rose to 59. The number of recovered patients more than doubled to 1606, leaving 2943 active cases at the end of the month.[15]

August 2020Edit

There were 103 new cases in August, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 4711. The death toll rose to 62. There were 2859 active cases at the end of the month (a decrease by 3% from the end of July).[16]

September 2020Edit

There were 118 new cases in September, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 4829. The death toll remained unchanged. The number of recovered patients increased to 1914, leaving 2853 active cases at the end of the month.[17]

October 2020Edit

There were 37 new cases in October, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 4866. The death toll remained unchanged. The number of recovered patients increased to 1924, leaving 2880 active cases at the end of the month.[18]

November 2020Edit

There were 52 new cases in November, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 4918. The death toll rose to 63. The number of recovered patients increased to 1929, leaving 2926 active cases at the end of the month.[19]

December 2020Edit

There were 45 new cases in December, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 4963. The death toll remained unchanged. There were 2976 active cases at the end of the month.[20]

January 2021Edit

There were 18 new cases in January, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 4981. The death toll remained unchanged. There were 33 active cases at the end of the month.[21]

February 2021Edit

There were 23 new cases in February, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 5004. The death toll remained unchanged. There were 21 active cases at the end of the month.[22]

March 2021Edit

There were 157 new cases in March, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 5161. The death toll rose to 67. There were 137 active cases at the end of the month.[23]

April 2021Edit

There were 1250 new cases in April, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 6411. The death toll rose to 88. There were 1211 active cases at the end of the month.[24]

May 2021Edit

60,000 doses of the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine were delivered through COVAX and the national vaccination campaign started on 20 May.[25] There were 680 new cases in May, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 7091. The death toll rose to 98. There were 134 active cases at the end of the month.[26]

June 2021Edit

There were 3970 new cases in June, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 11061. The death toll remained unchanged. From 20 May to 23 June, 78,695 persons were vaccinated.[27]

July 2021Edit

There were 102 new cases in July, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 11163. The death toll remained unchanged.[28]

August 2021Edit

There were 133 new cases in August, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 11296. The death toll rose to 100. There were 4337 active cases at the end of the month.[29]

September 2021Edit

There were 75 new cases in September, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 11371. The death toll remained unchanged. There were 4412 active cases at the end of the month.[30]

StatisticsEdit

Confirmed new cases per dayEdit

Confirmed deaths per dayEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Central African Republic Coronavirus - Worldometer". www.worldometers.info. Retrieved 2 October 2021.
  2. ^ Elsevier. "Novel Coronavirus Information Center". Elsevier Connect. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  3. ^ Reynolds, Matt (4 March 2020). "What is coronavirus and how close is it to becoming a pandemic?". Wired UK. ISSN 1357-0978. Archived from the original on 5 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Crunching the numbers for coronavirus". Imperial News. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  5. ^ "High consequence infectious diseases (HCID); Guidance and information about high consequence infectious diseases and their management in England". GOV.UK. Archived from the original on 3 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  6. ^ "World Federation Of Societies of Anaesthesiologists – Coronavirus". www.wfsahq.org. Archived from the original on 12 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  7. ^ Future scenarios of the healthcare burden of COVID-19 in low- or middle-income countries, MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College London.
  8. ^ Smith, Emma (9 April 2020). "These countries have only a handful of ventilators". Devex.
  9. ^ "Central African Republic confirms first coronavirus case -WHO". Reuters. 15 March 2020. Archived from the original on 15 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  10. ^ "Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) situation report 72" (PDF). World Health Organization. 1 April 2020. p. 8. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  11. ^ "Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) situation report 101" (PDF). World Health Organization. 30 April 2020. p. 8. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  12. ^ "Central African Republic confirms first COVID-19 death". www.aa.com.tr. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  13. ^ "Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) situation report 133" (PDF). World Health Organization. 1 June 2020. p. 6. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  14. ^ "Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) situation report 163" (PDF). World Health Organization. 1 July 2020. p. 6. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  15. ^ "Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) situation report 194" (PDF). World Health Organization. 1 August 2020. p. 4. Retrieved 4 August 2020.
  16. ^ "Outbreak brief 33: COVID-19 pandemic – 1 September 2020". World Health Organization. 1 September 2020. p. 2. Retrieved 17 September 2020.
  17. ^ "COVID-19 situation update for the WHO African region. External situation report 31" (PDF). World Health Organization. 30 September 2020. p. 4. Retrieved 4 October 2020.
  18. ^ "COVID-19 weekly epidemiological update". World Health Organization. 3 November 2020. p. 14. Retrieved 9 November 2020.
  19. ^ "Outbreak brief 46: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic". Africa CDC. 1 December 2020. p. 2. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  20. ^ Diallo, Oumy (1 January 2021). "Coronavirus en Afrique : quels sont les pays impactés ?". TV5MONDE (in French). Retrieved 4 January 2021.
  21. ^ "COVID-19 weekly epidemiological update". World Health Organization. 2 February 2021. p. 15. Retrieved 3 February 2021.
  22. ^ "Outbreak brief 59: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic". Africa CDC. 2 March 2021. p. 2. Retrieved 4 March 2021.
  23. ^ Hashmi, Faizan (31 March 2021). "CAR opposition raises alarm over lack of national COVID-19 vaccination plan". UrduPoint Network. Retrieved 5 April 2021.
  24. ^ "Weekly epidemiological update on COVID-19 - 4 May 2021". World Health Organization. 4 May 2021. p. 16. Retrieved 6 May 2021.
  25. ^ "La République centrafricaine lance sa campagne nationale de vaccination contre la COVID-19" (in French). Unicef. 21 May 2021. Retrieved 26 May 2021.
  26. ^ "Coronavirus: African Union Member States reporting COVID-19 cases as of 30 May 2021, 9 am EAT". APO. 30 May 2021. Retrieved 3 June 2021.
  27. ^ "Central African Republic Situation Report". UN OCHA. 2 July 2021. p. 2. Retrieved 6 July 2021.
  28. ^ "Outbreak brief 81: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic". Africa CDC. 1 August 2021. p. 3. Retrieved 4 August 2021.
  29. ^ "COVID-19 situation report for WHO Africa Region" (PDF). NIHR global health research unit tackling infections to benefit Africa at the University of Edinburgh. 2 September 2021. p. 16. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  30. ^ "COVID-19 situation report for WHO Africa Region" (PDF). NIHR global health research unit tackling infections to benefit Africa at the University of Edinburgh. 30 September 2021. p. 16. Retrieved 11 October 2021.