COVID-19 pandemic in Massachusetts

The COVID-19 pandemic in Massachusetts is part of an ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. The first confirmed case was reported on February 1, 2020, and the number of cases began increasing rapidly on March 5. Governor Charlie Baker declared a state of emergency on March 10. By March 12, more than a hundred people had tested positive for the virus. Most early cases were traceable to a company meeting held in Boston in late February by the Cambridge-based biotechnology firm Biogen. Massachusetts is fourth in the U.S. for overall number of cases and third for cases per capita statewide.[7] As of May 30, 2020, there were 96,301 confirmed cases and 6,768 deaths due to COVID-19. Massachusetts had performed 582,519 tests, 16.5% of which were positive.[1]

COVID-19 pandemic in Massachusetts
COVID-19 Prevalence in Massachusetts by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in Massachusetts by confirmed infections per 100,000 people (as of May 31)
  1000+ confirmed infected
  500 - 1000 confirmed infected
  100 - 500 confirmed infected
  20 - 100 confirmed infected
  0 - 20 confirmed infected
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationMassachusetts, United States
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseBoston
Arrival dateFebruary 1, 2020
(4 months)
Confirmed cases96,301 as of May 30[1]
Hospitalized cases1,904 (current)
9,789 (cumulative)
as of May 30[1]
Recovered46,354 (completed quarantine) as of May 26[note 1]
Deaths
6,768 as of May 30[1]
Government website
https://mass.gov/covid-19
COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts, United States  ()
     Deaths        Active cases and recoveries
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-02-01 1(n.a.) 0(n.a.)
1(=)
2020-03-02
2(+100%) 0(n.a.)
2(=)
2020-03-05
3(+50%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-06
8(+167%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-07
13(+62%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-08
28(+115%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-09
41(+46%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-10
92(+124%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-11
95(+3.3%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-12
108(+14%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-13
123(+14%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-14
138(+12%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-15
164(+19%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-16
197(+20%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-17
218(+11%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-18
256(+17%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-19
328(+28%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-20
413(+26%) 1(n.a.)
2020-03-21
525(+27%) 2(+100%)
2020-03-22
646(+23%) 5(+150%)
2020-03-23
777(+20%) 9(+80%)
2020-03-24
1,159(+49%) 11(+22%)
2020-03-25
1,838(+59%) 15(+36%)
2020-03-26
2,417(+32%) 25(+67%)
2020-03-27
3,240(+34%) 35(+40%)
2020-03-28
4,257(+31%) 44(+26%)
2020-03-29
4,955(+16%) 48(+9.1%)
2020-03-30
5,752(+16%) 56(+17%)
2020-03-31
6,620(+15%) 89(+59%)
2020-04-01
7,738(+17%) 122(+37%)
2020-04-02
8,966(+16%) 154(+26%)
2020-04-03
10,402(+16%) 192(+25%)
2020-04-04
11,736(+13%) 216(+12%)
2020-04-05
12,500(+6.5%) 231(+6.9%)
2020-04-06
13,837(+11%) 260(+13%)
2020-04-07
15,202(+9.9%) 356(+37%)
2020-04-08
16,790(+10%) 433(+22%)
2020-04-09
18,941(+13%) 503(+16%)
2020-04-10
20,974(+11%) 599(+19%)
2020-04-11
22,860(+9%) 686(+15%)
2020-04-12
25,475(+11%) 756(+10%)
2020-04-13
26,867(+5.5%) 844(+12%)
2020-04-14
28,163(+4.8%) 957(+13%)
2020-04-15
29,918(+6.2%) 1,108(+16%)
2020-04-16
32,181(+7.6%) 1,245(+12%)
2020-04-17
34,402(+6.9%) 1,404(+13%)
2020-04-18
36,372(+5.7%) 1,560(+11%)
2020-04-19
38,077(+4.7%) 1,706(+9.4%)
2020-04-20
39,643(+4.1%) 1,809(+6%)
2020-04-21
41,199(+3.9%) 1,961(+8.4%)
2020-04-22
42,944(+4.2%) 2,182(+11%)
2020-04-23
46,023(+7.2%) 2,360(+8.2%)
2020-04-24
50,969(+6.0%[i]) 2,556(+8.3%)
2020-04-25
53,348(+4.7%) 2,730(+6.8%)
2020-04-26
54,938(+3%) 2,899(+6.2%)
2020-04-27
56,462(+2.8%) 3,003(+3.6%)
2020-04-28
58,302(+3.3%) 3,153(+5%)
2020-04-29
60,265(+3.4%) 3,405(+8%)
2020-04-30
62,205(+3.2%) 3,562(+4.6%)
2020-05-01
64,311(+3.4%) 3,716(+4.3%)
2020-05-02
66,263(+3%) 3,846(+3.5%)
2020-05-03
68,087(+2.8%) 4,004(+4.1%)
2020-05-04
69,087(+1.5%) 4,090(+2.1%)
2020-05-05
70,271(+1.7%) 4,212(+3%)
2020-05-06
72,025(+2.5%) 4,420(+4.9%)
2020-05-07
73,721(+2.4%) 4,552(+3%)
2020-05-08
75,333(+2.2%) 4,702(+3.3%)
2020-05-09
76,743(+1.9%) 4,840(+2.9%)
2020-05-10
77,793(+1.4%) 4,979(+2.9%)
2020-05-11
78,462(+0.86%) 5,108(+2.6%[ii])
2020-05-12
79,332(+1.1%) 5,141(+0.65%[ii])
2020-05-13
80,497(+1.5%) 5,315(+3.4%)
2020-05-14
82,182(+2.1%) 5,482(+3.1%)
2020-05-15
83,421(+1.5%) 5,592(+2%)
2020-05-16
84,933(+1.8%) 5,705(+2%)
2020-05-17
86,010(+1.3%) 5,797(+1.6%)
2020-05-18
87,052(+1.2%) 5,862(+1.1%)
2020-05-19
87,925(+1%) 5,938(+1.3%)
2020-05-20
88,970(+1.2%) 6,066(+2.2%)
2020-05-21
90,084(+1.3%) 6,148(+1.4%)
2020-05-22
90,889(+0.89%) 6,228(+1.3%)
2020-05-23
91,662(+0.85%) 6,304(+1.2%)
2020-05-24
92,675(+1.1%) 6,372(+1.1%)
2020-05-25
93,271(+0.64%) 6,416(+0.69%)
2020-05-26
93,693(+0.45%) 6,473(+0.89%)
2020-05-27
94,220(+0.56%) 6,547(+1.1%)
2020-05-28
94,895(+0.72%) 6,640(+1.4%)
2020-05-29
95,512(+0.65%) 6,718(+1.2%)
2020-05-30
96,301(+0.83%) 6,768(+0.74%)
Number of cases and deaths: Cumulative totals reported to date

Sources: Reports from state health officials and news reports cited inline

  1. ^ The April 24th data includes 2,877 newly reported cases, representing a 6.0% increase, plus an additional 2,069 cases dating back to April 13th that had previously been omitted due to a reporting error by Quest Diagnostics.[2]
  2. ^ a b Some deaths that usually would have been reported as a part of May 12 data were reported in May 11 data due to a later reporting deadline.[3]

County [a] Cases [b][c] Deaths [c] Recov. [c][d] Pop.
(2020)
[e]
Cases
/100k
Deaths
/100k
Deaths
/Case %
14 / 14 96,301 6,768 46,354 6,892,503 1,376.8 96.3 7
Barnstable 1,305 115 212,990 608 54 8.88
Berkshire 544 40 124,944 431.4 32 7.42
Bristol 7,089 410 565,217 1,212.3 70.6 5.82
Dukes and Nantucket 39 1 28,731 135.7 3.5 2.56
Essex 14,099 909 789,034 1,761.5 113.4 6.44
Franklin 319 47 70,180 454.5 67 14.73
Hampden 5,982 572 466,372 1,260.4 120.5 9.56
Hampshire 855 88 160,830 525.4 51.6 9.82
Middlesex 21,124 1,596 1,611,699 1,294.1 97 7.5
Norfolk 8,016 815 706,775 1,120.4 113 10.09
Plymouth 7,819 548 521,202 1,482 103.4 6.86
Suffolk 17,873 868 803,907 2,201.5 106 4.81
Worcester 10,901 753 830,622 1,289.8 88.8 6.89
Unknown 336 6 n/a n/a n/a n/a 1.89
Updated May 30, 2020
Data is publicly reported by Massachusetts Department of Public Health[5][6]
  1. ^ County where an individual with a positive case was diagnosed. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported cases includes presumptive and confirmed case. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ a b c "–" denotes that no data is currently available for that county, not that the value is zero.
  4. ^ MDPH is not providing recovered case numbers by county. Local health departments could be providing this information at their discretion.
  5. ^ Population estimates from 2020 U.S. Census[4]

TimelineEdit

FebruaryEdit

 
Marriott Long Wharf hotel in Boston, the site of the Biogen company meeting to which most early COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts were traced

The first case of COVID-19 was confirmed by state health officials on February 1. Massachusetts became the fifth state in the U.S. to report a case of COVID-19.[8] The individual, a University of Massachusetts Boston student, had returned to Boston from Wuhan, China. Upon returning to Boston he began experiencing symptoms and sought medical care.[9][10]

175 executives of Biogen, a biotechnology company based in Cambridge, held a two-day leadership conference from February 26–28 at the Boston Marriott Long Wharf hotel.[11] On February 29, a Biogen executive began to develop symptoms and sought treatment at a Boston area hospital. Suspecting COVID-19 was the cause of the illness, the executive requested a test, but was told by hospital staff that it was not necessary.[11][12][13]

MarchEdit

March 1–7Edit

 
Empty shelves in the Waltham Costco after a weekend of heavy buying

On March 2, the second confirmed case in Massachusetts was reported. The patient was a woman in her 20s from Norfolk County. She had recently traveled to Italy with a school group from Saint Raphael Academy in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. She was the third person from the trip to test positive, with two people from Rhode Island who had gone on the trip also testing positive.[14]

On March 4, staff from Biogen contacted the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) to report that two executives who had recently traveled from Europe to Boston and had attended the February employee meeting had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 upon returning home. The same day, a "significant number" of Biogen employees asked to be tested for the virus at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), which had not been informed that anyone at the company had been exposed. The state police announced Shattuck Street would be closed because a group of 60 individuals were being transported along the route to Brigham and Women's Hospital.[15] On March 5, Biogen reported that three individuals who had attended the company event in Boston the previous week had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2.[16][17]

On March 6, public health officials reported five new cases bringing the state total to eight.[1][18] Four cases were in Suffolk County, three in Norfolk County, and one in Middlesex County. Two cases were associated with travel to Italy and one to Wuhan. All five new cases were associated with the Biogen meeting.[19][20][21]

On March 7, five more presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 were reported, bringing the total to 13.[22] Among those cases was the index case in Berkshire County, a man in his 60s from Clarksburg whose infection could not be traced.[23]

March 8–14Edit

On March 8, the MDPH reported 15 more presumptive cases of COVID-19,[21] all of which were individuals present at the Biogen conference,[19] bringing the total to 28.[1] In response to the outbreak, Biogen ordered all its employees to work from home.[24] The fifteen new presumptive cases included five from Suffolk County, five from Middlesex County, four from Norfolk County, and one whose county of residence was unknown.[25] Officials in North Carolina reported that five residents of Wake County tested positive for COVID-19; all five were participants in the previous week's Biogen meeting in Boston.[26]

 
Items out of stock at a CVS Pharmacy in Westford

On March 10, the first evidence of community transmission, also known as community spread, was found in a handful of cases in the Berkshires.[27] A man in Sudbury tested presumptive positive for COVID-19,[28] and the first case in Essex County was also reported.[29]

On March 12, there were 108 people in Massachusetts with confirmed or presumptive cases of COVID-19. Among those cases, 82 (75% of the total) were associates or employees of Biogen.[30] Governor Baker said the state had tested more than 200 patients and had the capacity to test up to 5,000.[31] The Boston Marriott Long Wharf hotel, which had hosted the Biogen company gathering, closed temporarily. In a letter to their guests, the hotel said it made the decision in cooperation with the Boston Public Health Commission.[32][33] Acton-Boxborough announced school closures from March 13 until March 20.[34]

On March 13, the Boston Marathon was postponed from April 20 until September 14.[35] A few hours later, Governor Baker prohibited gatherings of more than 250 people. The measure was targeted at large events and exempted most workplaces, transit buildings, polling locations, government buildings, and schools.[36] Cardinal O'Malley, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston, announced that all daily and Sunday masses and other religious services would be suspended in the Archdiocese of Boston until further notice.[37] Boston Mayor Marty Walsh announced that Boston Public Schools would be closed starting on March 17 until April 27.[38] Woburn announced that a presumptive positive case in the city had been confirmed as negative.[39]

On March 14, Cape Cod (Barnstable County) confirmed its first case,[40][41] a man in his 60s from Sandwich.[42] Officials in Worcester and Malden both announced their respective cities' first confirmed case of COVID-19, both linked to Biogen.[43][44][45] Of the state's 138 cases, 104 (75%) could be traced to employees or contacts of Biogen.[1]

A 59-year-old Worcester man died on a flight from Dubai to Boston, sparking speculation that he had died from COVID-19.[46] He had been sick with gastrointestinal problems and was in cardiac arrest during the flight. On March 16, Massachusetts State Police said an autopsy revealed he did not have COVID-19.[47]

March 15–21Edit

On March 15, Baker ordered all public and private schools in Massachusetts to close for three weeks, from March 17 through April 7. The same day, he also banned eating at restaurants, banned gatherings of more than 25 people, relaxed unemployment claim requirements, and enacted other interventions to try to slow the spread of COVID-19.[48] Hampden and Plymouth counties had their first cases.[1] Plymouth County's first case, in Hanover, resulted from travel.[49] Hampden County's first case tested positive at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield; the hospital noted an additional 23 suspected cases.[50]

 
Digital signs in a MBTA subway station displaying reduced hours and cancelled service

On March 16, Brockton announced its first case, and the mayor declared a state of emergency for the city.[51] Boston Mayor Marty Walsh ordered construction projects to shut down by March 23, maintaining only minimal staff for security. He also announced that all branches of the Boston Public Library would close beginning that night.[52] The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) announced that, starting March 17, it would run the subway and buses at Saturday levels of service during the week, with express buses still running, ferries not running, and commuter rail running on a modified schedule.[53] The next day, service was increased on the Blue Line, Green Line "E" branch (which serves Longwood Medical Area), and some bus lines to reduce crowding. Frequency on Massport shuttles to Logan International Airport was reduced or canceled.[54]

The number of hospitalized patients with suspected or known infections quadrupled to 53 between March 16 and 17. Major hospitals began reusing protective gear or asking the public for donations of masks.[55]

The number of cases where initial exposure was under investigation began to rise rapidly, whereas cases tracked to Biogen attendees and household contacts continued an overall mild decline.[note 2] On March 19, Governor Baker activated up to 2,000 Massachusetts National Guard to assist in the management of the pandemic.[56] The number of cases increased by 72, putting the total at 328, with 119 in Middlesex County.[57] Franklin and Hampshire counties – both in Western Massachusetts and the last non-island counties – had their first confirmed cases of COVID-19.[1]

On March 20, Massachusetts experienced its first death due to COVID-19. The fatality was an 87-year-old man from Suffolk County, who was hospitalized and who had preexisting health conditions.[58][59] Martha's Vineyard in Dukes County had its first case, a 50-year-old man in Tisbury.[60][61] This was the thirteenth of 14 counties in Massachusetts to report a case of COVID-19.[62] The cities of Somerville and Cambridge closed non-essential businesses.[63][64]

 
Closed picnic area at the Natick Service Plaza

Governor Baker announced that 5,207 people had been tested for COVID-19 in Massachusetts through state and commercial laboratories.[65] That night the state announced its second death due to COVID-19, a woman from Middlesex County in her 50s who had a preexisting health condition.[66][67] Nantucket County, the last county to have no cases of the virus, reported its first COVID-19 case.[68] In order to reduce contact between drivers and customers, the MBTA began rear-door boarding on above-ground stops for buses, the Green Line, and the Mattapan Trolley, except for passengers with disabilities who need to use the front door.[69]

March 22–31Edit

On March 22, Nantucket issued a shelter-in-place order, to start March 23 and end on April 6. Exceptions were made for essential services to remain open.[70] Governor Baker instructed people in mainland Massachusetts with second homes in Nantucket and Dukes County to stay on the mainland.[71] Three new deaths were reported by Massachusetts DPH, two men, both in their 70s, from Hampden and Berkshire counties, and a man in his 90s from Suffolk County.[note 3][72]

On March 23, Governor Baker announced a stay-at-home advisory effective from noon March 24 until noon April 7. Nonessential businesses were ordered to close physical workplaces, and restaurants and bars were restricted to offering takeout and delivery. People were told they could go out to obtain essential goods and services, such as groceries and medicine, but should follow social distancing protocols.[73]

On March 24, the number of cases jumped by 382 to 1,159, with two new deaths attributed to COVID-19.[note 4] This unusually large jump in cases (49%, versus 20–28% in the previous five days) was attributable to Quest Diagnostics processing 3,843 tests in one day, yielding 267 of the state's 382 new positive results.[1]

On March 25, the Commissioner of Public Health issued emergency regulations for grocery stores and pharmacies, requiring them to designate a daily shopping hour for senior citizens and provide checkout line distancing markers, hand washing and sanitizer for employees, disinfecting wipes for customers to use on carts. A ban on reusable bags became mandatory, overriding local bans on single-use plastic bags and eliminating fees for store-provided bags. Self-service food stations were ordered to be closed, and regular sanitization was required.[74]

On March 27, the state extended the tax filing deadline to July 15 and announced new travel guidelines.[75][76][77] State officials announced that the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Commissioner, Monica Bharel, had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2; she had mild symptoms and planned to recover at home.[78]

On March 30, the state announced that it had conducted almost 43,000 tests of Massachusetts residents, with Quest Diagnostics having conducted 21,321 (almost half) of the total tests administered.[note 5] Later that evening, the MBTA announced that 18 transit workers had tested positive for the virus.[79] In addition, the Boston Police Department confirmed that 19 officers and three civilian employees had all tested positive.[80]

AprilEdit

April 1–7Edit

The Archdiocese of Boston announced that eight priests had tested positive for the disease.[81] On April 2 Boston Mayor Walsh announced plans to convert the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center (BCEC) into a field hospital with 500 beds assigned to the homeless and 500 to accept COVID-19 patients from city hospitals.[82]

On April 2, more than 500 healthcare workers in Boston hospitals were reported to have tested positive for COVID-19.[83][84][85]

 
Closed playground in Salem on April 4, 2020

On April 5, Boston Mayor Walsh announced a voluntary city-wide curfew for non-emergency workers in Boston from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m.,[86] and asked all Bostonians to wear face coverings in public.[87]

April 8–14Edit

On April 9, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology published a preliminary study of sewage samples taken in the Boston area on March 25, in an effort to determine the extent of COVID-19 infections. Based on concentrations of the virus found in the samples, the study suggested that approximately 115,000 of the Boston region's 2.3 million people were infected. At the time of sampling, Massachusetts had only 646 confirmed cases in the area.[88][89]

Starting the evening of Friday April 10, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation closed some parkways to vehicle traffic to allow recreational pedestrians to spread out, and reduced parking availability at some state parks. The city of Boston also reduced parking near the Arnold Arboretum.[90] The Massachusetts Education Commissioner canceled MCAS standardized tests for the first time, taking advantage of a federal waiver.[91]

On April 12, there were 25,475 total cases, with 2,615 new cases, making Massachusetts the state with the third-most cases in the United States, behind only New York and New Jersey.[note 6] Massachusetts officials warned of ebb and flow of the spread of COVID-19.[92]

April 15–21Edit

On April 15, the Massachusetts DPH announced a plan to release town-by-town infection rates. This was a reversal from the earlier policy of discouraging the release of town-specific information concerning the number of infected in each particular community.[93]

On April 18, Baker announced that a third field hospital has opened in Cape Cod.[94]

On April 21, Governor Baker announced that Massachusetts schools would not return to in-person learning for the remainder of the academic year. He also extended through June 29 a previous order to close non-emergency childcare services.[95]

April 22–30Edit

On April 22, former 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren from Massachusetts announced that her oldest brother had died from COVID-19 in Oklahoma.[96]

On April 24, Governor Baker announced that while COVID-19 cases and testing were up in Massachusetts, hospitalizations have started to decrease and reached the lowest point since early April.[97] Massachusetts recorded 4,946 new cases partially due to an error by Quest Diagnostics in missing more than 10,000 test results, both positive and negative, recorded in April 24 data.[note 7]

On April 25, Governor Baker addressed the topic of when stay-at-home measures and closures of non-essential businesses would end. When restrictions were originally announced in mid-March, they were slated to end at noon on April 7; later their projected end date was pushed to May 4. Baker said it was unlikely restrictions would be lifted by then because the surge of cases had hit later than expected – May 4 presumed a surge in early April. Baker said the process of reopening will begin when hospitalizations start to decline consistently, and when there is "some evidence that we are in fact over the hump ... with respect to the surge."[98]

On April 28, Governor Baker extended the statewide stay-at-home advisory by two weeks, to May 18. He also said that once the advisory expires, the process of reopening will begin in stages, and not happen all at once.[99]

Also on April 28, it was reported that at the Soldiers' Home in Holyoke, at least 68 veterans – nearly 30 percent of the home's residents – had died of COVID-19 in what is believed to be the deadliest outbreak at a long-term care facility in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.[100]

MayEdit

May 1–7Edit

On May 1, Governor Baker issued an order, effective May 6, to require people to cover their faces in public when in situations where they are unable to keep six feet away from others.[101]

On May 4, a group of several hundred anti-lockdown protesters gathered outside the Massachusetts State House to urge Governor Baker to lift the state's stay-at-home advisory and reopen businesses.[102] Organizers had planned to hold the protest, named the "Liberty Rally", if businesses were not reopened by May 1. The event was promoted by conservative talk radio host Jeffrey Kuhner and Super Happy Fun America, the group responsible for organizing the controversial 2019 Boston Straight Pride Parade.[103]

May 8–14Edit

On May 8, Boston Mayor Walsh announced that parades and festivals would not take place in Boston at least until Labor Day (September 7).[104]

On May 11, Governor Baker announced a four-phased plan to reopen the state. In phase one, a small number of industries that do not involve much face-to-face interaction will be allowed to return to operating, with strict restrictions in place. In phase two, more industries will be allowed to open, with restrictions including limits on the number of people allowed to gather in one place. In phase three, more industries will open, with guidance on how to operate safely. Phase four is set to occur if a vaccine or therapy is developed allowing restrictions to be loosened. The state also published Mandatory Workplace Safety Standards to be followed by industries that will open as a part of phase one. These standards include requirements for social distancing, hygiene, staffing policies, and cleaning and disinfecting.[105]

May 15–21Edit

On May 18, Governor Baker released the details of the plan to reopen businesses in Massachusetts, and renamed the stay-at-home advisory to a "safer at home" advisory. The plan allows places of worship, essential businesses, manufacturing businesses, and construction sites to reopen with strict restrictions on May 18. Also as of May 18, hospitals and health centers may begin providing urgent preventative care and treatment services to high-risk patients. Baker also announced that people who choose to ride the MBTA will be required to wear masks. Beginning on May 25, additional businesses will be able to open, also with restrictions. Although Baker's plan includes office buildings in the list of businesses allowed to open on May 25, offices within Boston will not be allowed to open until June 1.[106]

May 22–30Edit

On May 26, Baker said in a press conference that the surge in COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts is over, as evidenced by declining numbers of people hospitalized by the disease. He announced that the Boston Hope field hospital, located in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, would no longer be accepting new patients. The facility has treated more than 700 people with COVID-19, and has also provided shelter to some of Boston's homeless community. Baker also said that other field hospitals around the state would begin to close.[107] Baker also announced $6 million in grants to go to small businesses to help them purchase protective equipment and implement the safety precautions indicated in the reopening plan.[108]

The Boston Athletic Association announced on May 28 that the 2020 Boston Marathon, which had already been postponed to September, would be canceled.[109]

EpidemiologyEdit

Initial exposures and spreadEdit

The index case of COVID-19 in Massachusetts was reported on February 1, 2020, in Boston. The patient, a University of Massachusetts Boston student in his 20s, had recently returned to Boston from Wuhan, China.[9] The second confirmed case in Massachusetts was reported on March 2. The patient was a woman in her 20s from Norfolk County, who had recently traveled to Italy with a school group from Saint Raphael Academy in Pawtucket, Rhode Island.[14] After a month of stasis, cases began growing rapidly on March 5, with most traceable to a Biogen employee meeting held in at the Marriott Long Wharf hotel in Boston from February 26–28.[note 8]

Exposure clusters were reported from mid to late March. Local transmission began being reported on March 16, slightly exceeding cases related to travel.[note 9] An outbreak cluster of untraced origin in the Berkshire Medical Center in Western Massachusetts was briefly tracked from March 11 through March 15. Cases that had been contact-traced to Biogen plateaued on March 13, and were surpassed by local transmissions on March 23. Cases of unknown exposure surpassed those of known exposure on March 19, then grew rapidly. When the Massachusetts Department of Public Health ceased updating statistics on exposure on March 27, there were 99 cases traced to Biogen, 163 cases of local transmission, 93 cases related to travel, and 2,885 cases where initial exposure was under investigation.[note 10]

The disease went undetected after entering Boston in Suffolk County in early February. It then re-emerged in early March and spread to the state's remaining 13 counties within three weeks. Suffolk County had its first reported case on February 1,[9] Norfolk County on March 2,[14] Middlesex County on March 6,[note 11] Berkshire County on March 7,[23] Essex County on March 10,[29] Barnstable and Worcester counties on March 14,[40][44] Hampden and Plymouth counties on March 15,[50][49] Franklin and Hampshire counties on March 19,[note 2] Dukes County on March 20,[60] and Nantucket County on March 21.[68][note 12]

TestsEdit

Massachusetts has performed 582,519 tests for COVID-19 as of May 30, 2020. Tests were conducted by the Massachusetts State Public Health Laboratory and more than thirty other organizations.[1]

HospitalizationsEdit

The first four hospitalizations in Massachusetts were reported on March 9.[note 13] The number of hospitalizations surpassed 10 on March 12,[note 14] 100 on March 25,[note 5] and 500 on March 31.[note 15] As of May 30, 1,904 people were in the hospital because of COVID-19, meaning that 2% of all known cases are hospitalized. 453 people were being treated in intensive care units. The average age of people hospitalized for COVID-19 in Massachusetts is 68.[note 16]

DeathsEdit

Deaths due to COVID-19 have been concentrated among the elderly. As of May 30, 5,748 of 6,768 (85%) COVID-19 deaths in Massachusetts were in patients aged 70 or older, and the average age of death in confirmed cases was 82.[1] More than half of the deaths in the state have been among residents of long-term care facilities.[110] The state's first death due to COVID-19 was on March 20: an 87-year-old man from Suffolk County, who was hospitalized and had preexisting health conditions.[58][59]

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts by age
Classification Cases Deaths Lethality
(%)
Number (%) Number (%)
Age Above 80 13,940 (14.5) 4,238 (62.6) (30.4)
70–79 8,682 (9.0) 1,510 (22.3) (17.4)
60–69 12,527 (13.0) 691 (10.2) (5.5)
50–59 15,325 (15.9) 239 (3.5) (1.6)
40–49 13,786 (14.3) 61 (0.9) (0.4)
30–39 14,373 (14.9) 20 (0.3) (0.1)
20–29 12,694 (13.2) 9 (0.1) (0.1)
0–19 4,597 (4.8) 0 (0.0) (0.0)
n/d 377 (0.4) 0 (0.0) (0.0)
All 96,301 (100.0) 6,768 (100.0) (7.0)
As of May 30, 2020[note 17]

Cases by categoryEdit

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health began publishing daily updates on COVID-19 in Massachusetts on March 6, 2020. Local media and the state also published intermittent reports beforehand.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in Massachusetts[1]
Total Exposure Tests Hospitalization Deaths Quarantine
Date
Confirmed
Change
% change
Presumptive
CDC confirmed
Biogen
Local
Travel
Unknown
Total
Change
% change
Yes
No
Unknown
Total
Change
% change
Total
Released
Source
February 1 1 0 0 1 [9]
... 1 1 0% 0 1 1
March 2 2 +1 +100% 1 1 2 608 377 [14]
... 2 0 0% 1 1 2 608 377
March 5 3 +1 +50% 2 1 2 719 470 [111][note 18]
March 6 8 +5 +166% 7 1 2 719 470 [note 18]
March 7 13 +5 +62% 12 1 2 719 470 [note 19]
March 8 28 +15 +115% 27 1 2 719 470 [note 20]
March 9 41 +13 +46% 40 1 2 4 37 719 470 [note 14][note 21]
March 10 92 +51 +124% 91 1 70 2 4 18 6 62 24 1083 638 [note 22][note 23]
March 11 95 +3 +3% 89 6 77 2 4 14 8 84 3 1083 638 [note 24][note 23]
March 12 108 +13 +14% 102 6 82 2 5 13 10 89 9 1083 638 [note 13][note 23]
March 13 123 +15 +14% 105 18 94 2 5 16 10 101 12 1083 638 [note 11][note 23]
March 14 138 +15 +12% 119 19 104 2 5 21 11 105 22 1083 638 [note 25][note 23]
March 15 164 +26 +19% 119 45 108 2 13 35 13 115 36 1083 638 [note 26][note 23]
March 16 197 +33 +20% 100 28 18 51 1296 14 123 60 1083 638 [note 9][note 23]
March 17 218 +21 +11% 102 33 24 59 1751 +455 +26% 21 145 52 2054 886 [note 27][note 28]
March 18 256 +38 +17% 97 38 26 95 2271 +520 +23% 27 151 78 2054 886 [note 2][note 28]
March 19 328 +72 +28% 97 46 34 151 3132 +861 +27% 43 160 125 2054 886 [note 29][note 28]
March 20 413 +85 +26% 97 63 49 204 4091 +959 +23% 58 199 156 1 2054 886 [note 30][note 28]
March 21 525 +112 +27% 97 69 53 306 5207 +1116 +21% 61 215 249 2 1 100% 2054 886 [note 31][note 28]
March 22 646 +121 +23% 99 83 68 396 6004 +797 +13% 71 263 312 5 +3 +150% 2054 886 [note 3][note 28]
March 23 777 +131 +20% 99 104 75 499 8922 +2918 +33% 79 286 412 9 +4 +80% 2054 886 [note 32][note 28]
March 24 1159 +382 +49% 99 120 86 854 13755 +4833 +35% 94 313 752 11 +2 +22% 3802 1655 [note 4][note 33]
March 25 1838 +679 +59% 99 146 92 1501 19794 +6039 +31% 103 350 1385 15 +4 +36% 3802 1655 [note 34][note 33]
March 26 2417 +579 +32% 99 163 93 2062 23621 +3827 +16% 219 366 1832 25 +10 +67% 3802 1655 [note 35][note 33]
March 27 3240 +823 +34% 99 163 93 2885 29371 +5691 +19% 288 999 1953 35 +10 +40% 3802 1655 [note 10][note 33]
March 28 4257 +1017 +31% 35049 +5678 +19% 350 1226 2681 44 +9 +26% 3802 1655 [note 36][note 33]
March 29 4955 +698 +16% 39066 +4017 +11% 399 1405 3151 48 +4 +9% 3802 1655 [note 37][note 33]
March 30 5752 +797 +16% 42793 +3727 +9% 453 1603 3696 56 +8 +17% 3802 1655 [note 5][note 33]
March 31 6620 +868 +15% 46935 +4142 +9% 562 1941 4117 89 +33 +59% 8394 3218 [note 15][note 38]
April 1 7738 +1118 +17% 51738 +4803 +10% 682 2340 4716 122 +33 +37% 8394 3218 [note 39][note 38]
April 2 8966 +1228 +16% 56608 +4870 +9% 813 2684 5469 154 +32 +26% 8394 3218 [note 40][note 38]
April 3 10402 +1436 +16% 62962 +6354 +11% 966 3063 6373 192 +38 +25% 8394 3218 [note 41][note 38]
April 4 11736 +1334 +13% 68800 +5838 +9% 1068 3378 7290 216 +24 +13% 8394 3218 [note 42][note 38]
April 5 12500 +764 +6% 71937 +3137 +4% 1145 3675 7680 231 +15 +7% 8394 3218 [note 43][note 38]
April 6 13837 +1337 +11% 76429 +4492 +6% 1241 3942 8654 260 +29 +13% 8394 3218 [note 44][note 38]
April 7 15202 +1365 +10% 81344 +4915 +6% 1435 4316 9451 356 +96 +37% 13024 5402 [note 45][note 46]
April 8 16790 +1588 +10% 87511 +6167 +8% 1583 4717 10490 433 +77 +22% 13024 5402 [note 47][note 46]
April 9 18941 +2151 +13% 94958 +7447 +9% 1747 5106 12088 503 +70 +16% 13024 5402 [note 48][note 46]
April 10 20974 +2033 +11% 102372 +7414 +8% 1956 5731 13287 599 +96 +19% 13024 5402 [note 49][note 46]
April 11 22860 +1886 +9% 108776 +6404 +6% 2120 6053 14687 686 +87 +15% 13024 5402 [note 50][note 46]
April 12 25475 +2615 +11% 116730 +7954 +7% 2235 6455 16785 756 +70 +10% 13024 5402 [note 6][note 46]
April 13 26867 +1392 +5% 122049 +5319 +4% 2340 6678 17849 844 +88 +12% 13024 5402 [note 51][note 46]
April 14 28163 +1296 +5% 126551 +4502 +3% 957 +113 +13% 17605 8118 [note 52][note 53]
April 15 29918 +1755 +6% 132023 +5472 +4% 1108 +151 +16% 17605 8118 [note 54][note 53]
April 16 32181 +2263 +7% 140773 +8750 +7% 1245 +137 +12% 17605 8118 [note 55][note 53]
April 17 34402 +2221 +7% 148744 +7971 +6% 1404 +159 +13% 17605 8118 [note 56][note 53]
April 18 36372 +1970 +6% 156806 +8062 +5% 1560 +156 +11% 17605 8118 [note 57][note 53]
April 19 38077 +1705 +5% 162241 +5435 +3% 1706 +146 +9% 17605 8118 [note 58][note 53]
April 20 39643 +1566 +4% 169398 +7157 +4% 3804 1809 +103 +6% 17605 8118 [note 59][note 53]
April 21 41199 +1556 +4% 175372 +5974 +4% 3872 1961 +151 +8% 17605 8118 [note 60][note 53]
April 22 42944 +1745 +4% 180462 +5090 +3% 3977 2182 +221 +11% 22952 13480 [note 61][note 62]
April 23 46023 +3079 +7% 195076 +14614 +8% 3890 2360 +178 +8% 22952 13480 [note 63][note 62]
April 24 50969 +2877[a] +6%[a] 215213 +10897[a] +5%[a] 3851 2556 +196 +8% 22952 13480 [note 7][note 62]
April 25 53348 +2379 +5% 226845 +11632 +5% 3847 2730 +174 +7% 22952 13480 [note 64][note 62]
April 26 54938 +1590 +3% 236100 +9255 +4% 3879 2899 +169 +6% 22952 13480 [note 65][note 62]
April 27 56462 +1524 +3% 244887 +8787 +4% 3892 3003 +104 +3% 22952 13480 [note 66][note 62]
April 28 58302 +1840 +3% 254500 +9613 +4% 3875 3153 +150 +5% 22952 13480 [note 67][note 62]
April 29 60265 +1963 +3% 265618 +11118 +4% 3856 3405 +252 +8% 27939 17659 [note 68][note 69]
April 30 62205 +1940 +3% 275647 +10029 +4% 3803 3562 +157 +5% 27939 17659 [note 70][note 69]
May 1 64311 +2106 +3% 289636 +13989 +5% 3716 3716 +154 +4% 27939 17659 [note 71][note 69]
May 2 66263 +1952 +3% 298994 +9358 +3% 3601 3846 +130 +3% 27939 17659 [note 72][note 69]
May 3 68087 +1824 +3% 314646 +15652 +5% 3617 4004 +158 +4% 27939 17659 [note 73][note 69]
May 4 69087 +1000 +1% 324268 +9622 +3% 3539 4090 +86 +2% 27939 17659 [note 74][note 69]
May 5 70271 +1184 +2% 333349 +9081 +3% 3542 4212 +122 +3% 27939 17659 [note 75][note 69]
May 6 72025 +1754 +2% 339639 +6290 +2% 3564 4420 +208 +5% 32019 22148 [note 76][note 77]
May 7 73721 +1696 +2% 351632 +11993 +3% 3436 4552 +132 +3% 32019 22148 [note 78][note 77]
May 8 75333 +1612 +2% 366023 +14391 +4% 3349 4704 +150 +3% 32019 22148 [note 79][note 77]
May 9 76743 +1410 +2% 376537 +10514 +3% 3229 4840 +138 +3% 32019 22148 [note 80][note 77]
May 10 77793 +1050 +1% 388389 +11852 +3% 3128 4979 +139 +3% 32019 22148 [note 81][note 77]
May 11 78462 +669 +1% 394728 +6339 +2% 3102 5108[b] +129[b] +3%[b] 32019 22148 [note 82][note 77]
May 12 79332 +870 +1% 401496 +6768 +2% 3127 5141[b] +33[b] +1%[b] 32019 22148 [note 16][note 77]
May 13 80497 +1165 +1% 410032 +8536 +2% 3101 5315 +174 +3% 48372 27812 [note 83][note 84]
May 14 82182 +1685 +2% 424361 +14329 +3% 2859 5482 +167 +3% 48372 27812 [note 85][note 84]
May 15 83421 +1239 +1% 435679 +11318 +3% 2767 5592 +110 +2% 48372 27812 [note 86][note 84]
May 16 84933 +1512 +2% 448089 +12410 +3% 2692 5705 +113 +2% 48372 27812 [note 87][note 84]
May 17 86010 +1077 +1% 460826 +12737 +3% 2597 5797 +92 +2% 48372 27812 [note 88][note 84]
May 18 87052 +1042 +1% 469199 +8373 +2% 2533 5862 +65 +1% 48372 27812 [note 89][note 84]
May 19 87925 +873 +1% 476940 +7741 +2% 2472 5938 +76 +1% 48372 27812 [note 90][note 84]
May 20 88970 +1045 +1% 489953 +13013 +3% 2518 6066 +128 +2% 56338 32549 [note 91][note 92]
May 21 90,084 +1114 +1% 501486 +11533 +2% 2396 6148 +82 +1% 56338 32549 [note 93][note 92]
May 22 90,889 +805 +1% 511644 +10158 +2% 2323 6228 +80 +1% 56338 32549 [note 94][note 92]
May 23 91,662 +773 +1% 520986 +9342 +2% 2237 6304 +76 +1% 56338 32549 [note 95][note 92]
May 24 92675 +1013 +1% 532373 +11387 +2% 2169 6372 +68 +1% 56338 32549 [note 96][note 92]
May 25 93271 +596 +1% 540561 +8188 +2% 2132 6416 +44 +1% 56338 32549 [note 97][note 92]
May 26 93693 +422 +0.5% 545481 +4920 +1% 2108 6473 +57 +1% 56338 32549 [note 98][note 92]
May 27 94220 +527 +1% 552144 +6663 +1% 2106 6547 +74 +1% 59565 46354 [note 99][note 1]
May 28 94895 +675 +1% 562323 +10179 +2% 2112 6640 +93 +1% 59565 46354 [note 100][note 1]
May 29 95512 +617 +1% 571745 +9422 +2% 1991 6718 +78 +1% 59565 46354 [note 101][note 1]
May 30 96301 +789 +1% 582519 +10774 +2% 1904 6768 +50 +1% 59565 46354 [note 17][note 1]
Date
Confirmed
Change
% change
Presumptive
CDC confirmed
Biogen
Local
Travel
Unknown
Total
Change
% change
Yes
No
Unknown
Total
Change
% change
Total
Released
Source
Total Exposure Tests Hospitalization Deaths Quarantine
  1. ^ a b c d The April 24th data includes 10,897 newly conducted tests and 2,877 newly reported cases, representing a 4.9% and a 6.0% increase respectively, plus an additional 9,240 tests and 2,069 cases dating back to April 13th that had previously been omitted due to a reporting error by Quest Diagnostics.[2]
  2. ^ a b c d e f Some deaths that usually would have been reported as a part of May 12 data were reported in May 11 data due to a later reporting deadline.[105]

Cases by countyEdit

Most COVID-19 cases and deaths were traced to a county by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The Massachusetts DPH releases an updated form with this data daily. This table counts cases on a cumulative basis.

Massachusetts COVID-19 cases (cumulative) by county[1]
Total Cases Deaths[112]
Date
Unknown
Barnstable
Berkshire
Bristol
Dukes and Nantucket
Essex
Franklin
Hampden
Hampshire
Middlesex
Norfolk
Plymouth
Suffolk
Worcester
Unknown
Source
February 1 1 [9]
... 1
March 2 1 1 [14]
... 1 1
March 5 1 1 1 [111]
March 6 1 3 4 [113]
March 7 1 5 3 4 [114]
March 8 1 10 7 9 1 [115]
March 9 5 1 15 10 10 1 [note 14]
March 10 7 1 1 41 22 20 1 [note 22]
March 11 7 1 1 44 23 19 1 [note 24]
March 12 9 1 2 49 24 22 1 1 [note 13]
March 13 9 1 2 60 24 26 2 [note 11]
March 14 1 9 1 5 65 28 27 2 [note 25]
March 15 1 9 1 6 1 75 31 1 31 6 2 [note 26]
March 16 1 11 2 8 1 83 36 3 36 6 10 [note 9]
March 17 2 14 5 8 1 89 43 5 42 8 1 [note 27]
March 18 2 17 5 14 1 2 100 45 5 51 10 4 [note 2]
March 19 5 18 6 19 1 3 1 119 52 5 72 14 13 [note 29]
March 20 9 20 6 29 1 3 2 144 64 11 86 19 19 [note 30]
March 21 11 21 14 1 41 2 9 2 177 69 20 108 24 26 [note 31]
March 22 24 23 24 1 60 2 12 4 199 75 25 126 37 34 [note 3]
March 23 30 26 25 1 73 2 15 6 232 82 32 154 42 57 [note 32]
March 24 40 37 31 2 118 5 24 8 304 129 64 234 73 90 [note 4]
March 25 51 71 67 3 177 14 45 11 446 222 101 342 129 159 [note 34]
March 26 67 73 90 3 247 16 55 17 538 292 138 448 166 267 [note 35]
March 27 100 105 129 4 350 24 90 20 685 393 187 631 219 303 [note 10]
March 28 133 119 179 8 472 39 183 30 842 490 272 843 291 356 [note 36]
March 29 148 151 208 8 570 41 201 37 981 548 325 940 337 460 [note 37]
March 30 173 162 263 8 653 49 255 46 1141 628 380 1115 390 489 [note 5]
March 31 191 171 306 8 784 61 354 69 1340 738 459 1373 433 333 [note 15]
April 1 255 183 366 11 885 72 475 81 1582 829 561 1624 563 251 [note 39]
April 2 283 213 424 12 1039 85 546 102 1870 938 621 1896 667 270 [note 40]
April 3 314 240 517 16 1238 89 661 114 2202 1045 745 2183 825 213 [note 41]
April 4 330 253 601 16 1400 95 733 125 2468 1199 898 2429 915 274 [note 42]
April 5 347 258 659 17 1506 100 768 128 2632 1271 963 2658 978 215 [note 43]
April 6 383 268 722 17 1653 107 889 147 2950 1382 1067 2929 1077 246 [note 44]
April 7 405 278 768 18 1841 118 997 158 3187 1592 1194 3245 1172 229 [note 45]
April 8 423 281 835 18 2103 118 1081 164 3545 1778 1327 3600 1296 223 [note 47]
April 9 444 304 994 18 2336 128 1276 177 4045 2007 1507 4041 1461 203 [note 48]
April 10 464 329 1086 21 2670 135 1394 194 4447 2216 1677 4534 1678 129 [note 49]
April 11 480 336 1191 21 2896 138 1545 204 4872 2395 1809 4926 1822 225 [note 50]
April 12 501 350 1327 21 3170 143 1647 219 5660 2649 2024 5359 2032 373 [note 6]
April 13 502 355 1394 21 3413 148 1694 224 5983 2838 2141 5579 2128 447 [note 51]
April 14 514 360 1435 21 3594 155 1798 233 6254 2969 2207 5872 2246 506 [note 52]
April 15 530 370 1508 21 3894 160 1885 239 6681 3122 2308 6279 2350 572 18 23 56 140 25 154 5 221 147 95 113 100 11 [note 54]
April 16 550 382 1605 21 4245 170 1985 248 7206 3342 2466 6820 2503 638 18 26 63 159 25 164 5 258 173 99 132 110 13 [note 55]
April 17 573 383 1659 21 4584 173 2134 258 7744 3499 2577 7272 2765 760 20 26 75 178 25 184 6 294 195 111 132 118 40 [note 56]
April 18 590 385 1698 23 4914 177 2254 306 8297 3659 2688 7696 2952 733 20 27 83 193 25 203 6 334 215 128 156 129 41 [note 57]
April 19 632 387 1731 23 5153 181 2337 317 8737 3789 2832 8074 3069 815 21 29 87 209 26 214 6 372 244 137 180 140 41 [note 58]
April 20 664 387 1779 23 5296 187 2438 332 9253 3960 2976 8314 3179 855 21 29 88 225 26 224 9 402 263 137 263 140 9 [note 59]
April 21 672 404 1852 23 5521 192 2533 337 9621 4062 3043 8669 3341 929 22 29 96 1 245 29 244 10 428 290 141 285 133 8 [note 60]
April 22 678 404 1908 23 5783 196 2678 345 10094 4212 3253 9060 3456 854 27 31 104 1 271 30 271 14 494 312 157 318 143 9 [note 61]
April 23 708 418 2181 23 6219 203 2836 367 10724 4541 3529 9739 3798 737 28 31 109 1 292 30 287 15 545 335 176 346 155 38 [note 63]
April 24 747 425 2697 24 6841 217 3060 396 11681 4979 4160 10724 4227 791 32 31 126 1 319 31 299 17 585 368 197 372 166 12 [note 7]
April 25 756 425 2829 24 7212 225 3229 412 12253 5172 4380 11218 4460 753 37 31 130 1 336 32 315 20 629 400 212 391 183 13 [note 64]
April 26 772 428 2923 25 7489 226 3295 427 12648 5288 4495 11543 4572 807 37 31 134 1 350 33 327 24 670 418 230 424 206 14 [note 65]
April 27 798 428 3068 25 7708 231 3381 443 12953 5398 4607 11883 4744 795 39 31 137 1 359 33 337 26 700 429 240 448 215 8 [note 66]
April 28 820 430 3270 26 7972 237 3546 509 13417 5567 4744 12140 4999 625 39 31 155 1 383 33 346 27 731 448 256 469 229 5 [note 67]
April 29 842 440 3429 26 8380 252 3698 531 13799 5700 4871 12539 5300 457 40 34 165 1 425 35 358 26 802 484 273 504 253 5 [note 68]
April 30 860 442 3580 28 8673 257 3777 546 14208 5896 5083 12890 5550 415 43 35 172 1 448 37 373 30 845 499 285 524 265 48 [note 70]
May 1 902 444 3792 29 9028 260 3900 518 14607 6065 5259 13295 5787 425 45 36 182 1 460 37 381 32 885 522 301 550 278 6 [note 71]
May 2 937 448 3916 29 9362 263 4003 549 15048 6187 5409 13606 6129 377 46 36 187 1 484 37 387 33 923 535 312 569 292 4 [note 72]
May 3 946 451 4019 32 9542 269 4066 559 15370 6280 5507 13777 6288 981 47 36 198 1 499 37 398 36 972 550 323 588 312 7 [note 73]
May 4 961 453 4103 32 9773 273 4114 563 15757 6382 5602 13941 6471 662 47 36 205 1 512 37 408 36 997 555 333 596 320 7 [note 74]
May 5 969 457 4235 32 9979 275 4203 575 15980 6466 5736 14173 6597 594 48 36 210 1 527 37 415 47 1028 575 341 609 331 7 [note 75]
May 6 997 461 4380 34 10344 278 4321 580 16327 6610 5899 14476 6992 326 55 37 223 1 561 38 425 47 1070 596 357 642 365 3 [note 76]
May 7 1021 464 4529 33 10610 285 4441 595 16676 6729 6081 14732 7197 328 57 37 232 1 578 39 434 48 1103 608 364 663 385 3 [note 78]
May 8 1038 472 4670 33 10995 289 4522 654 17014 6801 6194 14944 7410 297 61 37 252 1 601 41 441 48 1132 623 375 683 404 3 [note 79]
May 9 1056 472 4847 34 11211 294 4647 659 17307 6887 6311 15119 7611 288 66 37 260 1 625 42 445 50 1169 635 384 703 420 3 [note 80]
May 10 1068 475 4931 35 11353 294 4714 676 17589 6952 6382 15279 7743 302 68 37 266 1 644 42 449 55 1207 650 393 718 444 5 [note 81]
May 11 1075 478 4999 35 11432 296 4763 688 17774 7004 6457 15356 7818 287 73 37 274 1 669 42 458 57 1235 661 408 731 457 5 [note 82]
May 12 1093 485 5125 35 11572 297 4831 702 17953 7046 6507 15454 7959 273 73 37 278 1 678 42 464 57 1244 663 409 732 459 4 [note 16]
May 13 1111 486 5249 35 11703 302 4889 708 18201 7129 6592 15587 8241 264 79 37 288 1 704 43 475 64 1282 676 424 749 489 4 [note 83]
May 14 1119 488 5440 36 11950 302 4974 724 18381 7258 6774 15881 8555 300 82 37 297 1 725 43 487 66 1327 696 435 759 524 3 [note 85]
May 15 1137 491 5590 36 12131 304 5038 738 18683 7331 6875 15996 8786 285 86 37 303 2 751 43 494 67 1347 710 444 768 538 2 [note 86]
May 16 1147 495 5748 37 12314 304 5133 751 18883 7412 6987 16346 9067 309 90 37 313 1 766 44 506 69 1370 719 455 778 554 3 [note 87]
May 17 1150 497 5870 38 12462 308 5205 767 19129 7474 7064 16479 9252 315 93 37 320 1 776 44 516 72 1394 725 460 787 569 3 [note 88]
May 18 1155 497 5996 38 12587 308 5264 774 19345 7524 7139 16671 9442 312 95 37 324 1 790 45 517 72 1412 728 464 793 581 3 [note 89]
May 19 1177 497 6080 38 12748 308 5335 780 19504 7565 7198 16825 9582 288 96 37 330 1 797 45 521 73 1436 735 470 797 597 3 [note 90]
May 20 1197 500 6165 38 12920 309 5418 792 19708 7607 7280 16962 9780 294 98 37 338 1 817 46 526 76 1462 749 481 807 625 3 [note 91]
May 21 1202 509 6286 39 13063 310 5492 806 19930 7691 7366 17089 9997 304 99 37 345 1 831 46 533 76 1478 759 487 813 640 3 [note 93]
May 22 1257 510 6362 39 13221 310 5568 812 20085 7724 7424 17180 10101 296 103 38 353 1 842 46 537 76 1496 771 492 818 652 3 [note 94]
May 23 1264 515 6426 39 13334 312 5621 819 20232 7759 7480 17291 10251 319 107 38 362 1 848 46 541 77 1512 774 501 827 667 3 [note 95]
May 24 1269 520 6596 39 13457 313 5687 830 20437 7812 7559 17417 10431 308 109 38 369 1 859 47 542 78 1518 782 508 838 679 4 [note 96]
May 25 1277 523 6681 39 13575 314 5755 834 20539 7844 7594 17480 10505 311 110 38 375 1 863 47 543 80 1527 784 513 839 692 4 [note 97]
May 26 1280 537 6733 39 13670 315 5796 840 20601 7863 7632 17533 10557 297 110 39 382 1 870 47 546 82 1535 791 522 844 700 4 [note 98]
May 27 1286 539 6779 39 13778 317 5845 843 20706 7880 7656 17596 10647 309 111 40 390 1 878 47 554 82 1549 794 530 850 716 5 [note 99]
May 28 1295 539 6852 39 13899 319 5878 845 20857 7919 7724 17698 10713 318 115 40 399 1 895 47 562 83 1564 799 539 852 738 6 [note 100]
May 29 1303 544 6930 39 13994 319 5942 853 20972 7959 7766 17786 10816 289 116 40 404 1 906 47 569 86 1583 811 542 861 746 6 [note 101]
May 30 1305 544 7089 39 14099 319 5982 855 21124 8016 7819 17873 10901 336 115 40 410 1 909 47 572 88 1596 815 548 868 753 6 [note 17]
Date
Barnstable
Berkshire
Bristol
Dukes and Nantucket
Essex
Franklin
Hampden
Hampshire
Middlesex
Norfolk
Plymouth
Suffolk
Worcester
Unknown
Barnstable
Berkshire
Bristol
Dukes and Nantucket
Essex
Franklin
Hampden
Hampshire
Middlesex
Norfolk
Plymouth
Suffolk
Worcester
Unknown
Source
Total Cases Deaths
County
pop.
(2019)
212,990
124,944
565,217
28,731
789,034
70,180
466,372
160,830
1,611,699
706,775
521,202
803,907
830,622
212,990
124,944
565,217
28,731
789,034
70,180
466,372
160,830
1,611,699
706,775
521,202
803,907
830,622
[116]

Government responseEdit

 
Interior of the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center (BCEC), pictured during a 2016 conference. The BCEC will be converted to a field hospital.

Citing the rapid increase in cases, Governor Charlie Baker declared a state of emergency for Massachusetts on March 10.[117][118] During a press conference on March 14, 2020, Governor Baker established an emergency command center and promised to expand statewide lab testing.[119]

On March 15, Governor Baker banned all public gatherings of more than 25 people, closed all K–12 public schools from March 17 through April 7, and banned on-site service at bars and restaurants for the same period.[120] On March 25, Baker ordered all schools and non-emergency childcare services to be closed through May 4, extending the original closure by three weeks.[121] On April 21, Baker announced that schools would not reopen for the remainder of the school year, and extended the order to close non-emergency childcare services through June 29.[95]

Secretary of Health and Human Services Marylou Sudders said a shipment of three million masks the state had negotiated to buy from BJ's Wholesale Club, was impounded by the federal government from the Port of New York and New Jersey on March 18. A further order from MSC Industrial Supply for 400 masks to be delivered on March 20 was also claimed by the federal government using force majeure.[122] Governor Baker reached out to the New England Patriots professional American football team, who used the team plane "AirKraft" to bring approximately 1.2 million N95 masks from China to Boston.[123]

On March 23, Governor Baker announced a stay-at-home advisory to be effective from March 24 until April 7. On March 31, the advisory was extended to May 4.[73] On April 28, this advisory was further extended to May 18.[99] On May 18, Baker renamed the advisory a "safer at home" advisory. Under the safer at home advisory, people are advised to only leave their homes for previously excepted activities, or to visit facilities or participate in activities allowed in the reopening plan that was also detailed on May 18.[124]

On March 27, Governor Baker asked travelers from out of state to avoid Massachusetts or to self-quarantine upon arrival for 14 days. Electronic highway signs were activated, and travelers arriving at Logan International Airport, Worcester Regional Airport, and South Station were given flyers.[125] Medical students were graduated early, and emergency orders were issued giving some nurses with more than two years of experience authority to write prescriptions, and granting incoming medical residents and interns 90-day medical licenses.[125]

Starting March 31, hotels, motels and online rentals like Airbnb were ordered to close to recreational travelers so they could be used to house essential workers and displaced residents.[126] The Boston Convention and Exhibition Center is being prepared as a 1,000-bed field hospital for COVID-19 patients, including 500 beds for infected homeless patients.[127] The DCU Center in Worcester was set up as a field hospital for recovering COVID-19 patients, overseen by UMass Memorial Medical Center.[128]

The Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) moved to an appointment-only system to avoid overcrowding, and the state extended deadlines for many renewals by 60 days to reduce the need for in-person transactions. With visits down about 90%, eight of the 30 RMV branches closed completely. The National Association of Government Employees, representing customer service employees at the RMV, asked that the remaining offices be closed for worker safety, but the Secretary of Transportation said essential workers needed the RMV to continue operating.[129]

 
Closed playground in Boston

When people in parks were found to not be following social distancing, many parks and playgrounds were closed. Some cities removed or blocked off basketball hoops and other amenities to discourage people from gathering.[130] Beaches and their parking lots were also ordered to close.[131] On April 5, Boston's Mayor Walsh issued a stay-at-home advisory for the city of Boston. All non-essential workers were asked to stay home from 9:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m., starting April 6. All baseball, tennis, and hockey fields in parks were ordered to be closed. Residents were instructed not to visit family or fields outside of their households. The restrictions are enforceable by fines.[86]

On April 5, Boston's Mayor Walsh encouraged, but did not require, people to wear masks when outside the home. He asked that people leave medical masks for essential workers and make their own if necessary.[86] On April 27, Somerville Mayor Joseph Curtatone announced that, beginning on April 29, people would be required to cover their faces when in any public space. Somerville officials said that, while the order would be enforceable with $300 fines after a one-week grace period elapsed, they would be focusing on educating people and distributing masks where possible to vulnerable people, reserving fines for those "showing willful disregard" for the order.[132][133] On May 1, Governor Baker issued an order, effective May 6, to require people to cover their faces in public when in situations where they are unable to keep six feet away from others.[101]

On May 11, Governor Baker announced a four-phased plan to reopen the state. In phase one, a small number of industries that do not involve much face-to-face interaction will be allowed to return to operating, with strict restrictions in place. In phase two, more industries will be allowed to open, with restrictions including limits on the number of people allowed to gather in one place. In phase three, more industries will open, with guidance on how to operate safely. Phase four is set to occur if a vaccine or therapy is developed allowing restrictions to be loosened. The state also published Mandatory Workplace Safety Standards to be followed by industries that will open as a part of phase one. These standards include requirements for social distancing, hygiene, staffing policies, and cleaning and disinfecting.[105] On May 18, Governor Baker released the details of the plan to reopen businesses in Massachusetts. The plan allows places of worship, essential businesses, manufacturing businesses, and construction sites to reopen with strict restrictions on May 18. Also as of May 18, hospitals and health centers may begin providing urgent preventative care and treatment services to high-risk patients. Baker also announced that people who choose to ride the MBTA will be required to wear masks. Beginning on May 25, additional businesses will be able to open, also with restrictions. Although Baker's plan includes office buildings in the list of businesses allowed to open on May 25, offices within Boston will not be allowed to open until June 1.[106]

Spread among population groupsEdit

Long-term care facilitiesEdit

As of May 30, 2020, 4,217 deaths have been attributed to COVID-19 in long-term care facilities in Massachusetts. Deaths among residents of long-term care facilities make up more than half of all COVID-19 deaths in the state.[110] 20,988 residents and healthcare workers at these facilities have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and 349 long-term care facilities in Massachusetts have reported at least one case of COVID-19.[1] On April 15, the state announced it had allocated $130 million in additional funding to these facilities, and would offer signing bonuses to job applicants in an attempt to increase staffing.[134] On April 27, the governor of Massachusetts announced another $130 million in funding to go to nursing homes. He also said the state would be creating a team of 120 nurses to be sent to long-term care facilities in emergencies, and announced that the facilities would begin to be audited for compliance with a checklist of care criteria.[135]

Soldiers' Home in HolyokeEdit

Soldiers' Home, a long-term care facility for older veterans in Holyoke, is believed to have had the largest death toll of all long-term care facilities in the United States. On March 30, a potential cluster of COVID-19 cases was reported at the facility. Eleven residents had recently died, and another eleven residents along with several staff members had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2.[136] Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse accused the nursing facility of mismanagement and lack of transparency in the events surrounding the outbreak and its resulting fatalities.[137][138] Governor Baker announced on April 1 that he had appointed an independent investigator to examine the outbreak at Soldiers' Home.[139] On April 2, three more residents of Holyoke Soldiers' Home died, bringing that outbreak's total number of deaths to 18.[140] On April 3, Holyoke Medical Center announced that a total of 21 residents of the Soldier's Home in Holyoke had died, at least 15 of whom tested positive for COVID-19.[141] According to officials, a total of 59 residents had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2.[142][143] On April 10, the U.S. Attorney's office in Boston announced that it would be opening a federal investigation into whether Soldiers' Home violated the rights of its patients by failing to provide them adequate medical care and protection during the COVID-19 outbreak.[144] As of April 28, 68 veterans who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 had died. An additional 82 residents and 81 staff at the facility had tested positive for the virus.[100]

Life Care Center of Nashoba ValleyEdit

 
A medic with the Massachusetts National Guard and a resident of the Life Care Center of Nashoba Valley nursing home handle a nasal swab that will be used to test for COVID-19.

The Life Care Center of Nashoba Valley in Littleton reported on April 10 that 75 of its 204 employees were out sick and at least 14 of them had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2.[145] On April 11, officials at the Life Care Center of Nashoba Valley announced that Maria Krier, a nurse who had spoken out about improper training at the nursing home, had died. She had told reporters she believed management had no experience with infectious disease and that that had contributed to the spread of COVID-19 at the facility.[146] On April 15, a letter was found outside the Life Care Center which made threatening and violent remarks, referencing the COVID-19 outbreak.[147] As of April 24, sixteen residents of the facility had died from COVID-19-related causes in the period since March 27. 78 residents tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 among the 98 who have been tested for the virus.[148]

Other facilitiesEdit

As of April 16, 17 residents of the Belmont Manor Nursing Rehabilitation Center in Belmont had died in a five-day period, bringing the overall total of deaths at the facility to 30.[149] As of April 24, 49 residents who had been confirmed to have COVID-19 had died, and an additional 67 residents and 73 staff were positive for the virus. In the time since the pandemic began, more than a third of Belmont Manor's residents have died.[150]

As of April 21, more than two thirds of residents (60 out of 92) at Pleasant Bay Nursing Center in Brewster have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2.[151]

On April 17, officials from the Alliance Health at West Acres nursing home in Brockton announced that a total of 37 residents had tested positive for COVID-19 and 15 others had died from the virus.[152] As of April 23, 22 residents had died out of 53 total residents who had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. A part-time certified nursing assistant who had worked at Alliance Health had also died from COVID-19.[153] On April 17, the City of Brockton also announced that at least 29 of the city's 46 deaths attributed to COVID-19 were from residents of the long-term care facilities within the city. These deaths also included ten residents of the Brockton Health Center who died after contracting the disease, and at least four residents at Saint Joseph Manor Nursing facility.[152]

As of April 24, 41 residents of the Mary Immaculate Nursing/Restorative Center in Lawrence, one of the largest nursing facilities in the state, have died of COVID-19. 37 staff members had tested positive, forcing the Center to rely on healthcare workers from its affiliated health system while the employees recovered.[154]

On April 12, officials with JGS Lifecare in Longmeadow announced in a letter to benefactors that 21 residents of the facility had died of COVID-19, and 93 residents and 43 staff had tested positive.[155][156] This number had more than tripled since the facility had reported 29 cases on April 2.[157]

As of April 4, 21 residents of the Charlwell House Health and Rehabilitation Center in Norwood had died in less than two weeks.[158] As of April 3, seven of the people who died had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and only twenty of the more than two hundred residents and staff at the facility had been able to be tested for SARS-CoV-2.[159]

As of April 24, 23 residents had confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Jack Satter House in Revere, a nursing home run by Hebrew Senior Life. Of those, 11 residents died.[160][161][162]

On April 3, AdviniaCare in Wilmington announced that 51 of 98 residents had tested positive for the virus. AdviniaCare had been selected to become a recovery center for Boston-area COVID-19 patients who were still contagious but had recovered sufficiently to be discharged out of the intensive care units of Boston area hospitals. However, after the high number of residents tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, AdviniaCare announced they would be delaying the plan to relocate residents and convert the facility into a recovery center.[163] As of April 20, 28 patients at the facility had died from COVID-19. Twelve residents were currently infected as of that date, and 43 had recovered.[164]

Racial disparitiesEdit

Preliminary data has shown that African Americans and others of African descent in Massachusetts have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. Although only 25% of the population of Boston are black, they have accounted for 41% of the COVID-19 cases in the city. On April 9, the city of Boston announced it had created a COVID-19 Health Inequities Task Force, which would advise the city in addressing inequality among testing, data analysis, and healthcare for underrepresented racial groups.[165] On April 7, it was reported that at Massachusetts General Hospital the proportion of Latinos among COVID-19 patients was four times the percentage of Latinos among people usually being treated at the hospital. Public health experts have reported that the virus has disproportionately affected Massachusetts communities with high black, Latino, and immigrant populations because many in those communities are exposed to the virus through essential jobs at grocery stores, public transit, and food delivery services. They also attribute the higher prevalence of the disease to members of those communities living in smaller or more densely populated homes, making social distancing a challenge.[166] On April 24, the medical director for the city of Worcester announced that 30% of COVID-19 cases in Worcester County were among Latinos, despite only 11% of the population being Latino. He reported that black people also appeared to be disproportionately affected, accounting for 10% of COVID-19 cases but only 5% of the county population.[167]

Until early April, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, which is the primary organization compiling test data in Massachusetts, had declined to release data on the specific impact of COVID-19 to racial and ethnic groups.[166] They began to release demographic data on coronavirus infections on April 8, although the data was very incomplete, with the race or ethnicity of the patient unknown in two-thirds of cases. That same day, Health and Human Services Secretary Marylou Sudders spoke at a press conference held by Governor Baker, saying they would be issuing an order that day to require race and ethnicity fields be completed when tests were performed, so public reporting could be improved.[168]

Prison populationEdit

On March 21, the Massachusetts Department of Correction (DOC) announced the first confirmed case of COVID-19 among its inmate population. According to officials at the Massachusetts Treatment Center (MTC) in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, a male inmate who is serving a life sentence tested positive. Massachusetts DOC noted at the time that this was the only known case of COVID-19 in its inmate population.[169] As of April 15, four prisoners at the Massachusetts Treatment Center have died from COVID-19, making it the only prison in the state that has reported inmate deaths from the virus.[170]

On April 10, the Massachusetts DOC released data showing the rate of infection among female inmates at MCI–Framingham was nearly ten times that of the overall state prison population, with 17 (7.8 percent) infected.[171]

As of May 28, the Prisoners' Legal Services non-profit reported that 589 cases of COVID-19 had been confirmed among prisoners in Massachusetts jails and prisons, and eight prisoners had died. 337 staff members had also tested positive for SARS-CoV-2.[172]

Homeless populationEdit

On April 7, the Chief of Boston Health and Human Services Marty Martinez spoke at Boston Mayor Walsh's press conference, where he reported that there were around 200 cases of COVID-19 among homeless people in Boston, which was around 30% of the homeless people who had been tested. The city of Boston allocated 500 of the beds at the field hospital being created at the Boston Convention and Exposition Center to go to homeless people with COVID-19.[173] A homeless shelter in Worcester found on April 17 that out of 114 shelter guests who were tested for SARS-CoV-2, 49 (43%) tested positive. Many of those who tested positive were asymptomatic or had mild symptoms; Dr. Erik Garcia, the medical director of the Homeless Outreach and Advocacy Project at the Family Health Center of Worcester, said that "there were some symptoms, but certainly none of the classic symptoms. And most people were complaining of a slight worsening of the chronic cough that they already had – no fevers and no other symptoms."[174] After a cluster of coronavirus cases were traced back to the Boston Pine Street Inn shelter, the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program tested all shelter guests for the virus and found that out of 397 people tested, 146 tested positive but had been experiencing no symptoms.[175] The state of Massachusetts has created isolation sites in Pittsfield, Taunton, and Lexington for people who are homeless and who have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 or have a doctor's note recommending they isolate.[176] On April 24, Boston Mayor Walsh announced that public health officials would be testing everyone in the city's shelter system for SARS-CoV-2. As of April 23, 1,340 people had been tested, and 453 (34%) of them tested positive.[177]

Societal effectsEdit

The sudden surge of cases in Massachusetts during the week of March 9 led many organizations to ask employees to work from home, and prompted museums and libraries to close. This led to a noticeable decline in Boston's rush hour traffic; in some cases, drive times for major highways dropped by 30 to 50 percent.[178]

Food supplies and supermarketsEdit

 
Floor sign in Somerville instructing people where to stand to maintain physical distance from others

Panic buying, especially since the week of March 11, led to shortages of some products, and there were crowds and long lines at grocery stores as early in the day as 7:00 a.m.[179] Pandemic supplies like sanitizing supplies and masks remained difficult to get for weeks, as did toilet paper. Grocery retailers shortened their hours to allow employees more time to restock, and as later required by state law, to offer older and more vulnerable people a time in the early morning when they can shop separately.[180] Later, emergency orders required grocery stores to implement stricter measures, including limiting the amount of people allowed inside stores at a time, and marking queues to maintain social distancing.[181] They installed plastic guards to reduce contact between customers and cashiers, and designated some aisles one-way. By the end of May, grocery stores started expanding hours, with toilet paper back on shelves significant quantities but home baking supplies like yeast and flour with thin stocks.

With lines forming outside many grocery stores due to limited capacity, community supported agriculture and milk delivery subscriptions experienced sudden growth (one reporting sales quadrupled), as did demand for food at farm stands (one using self-service kiosks with security cameras and no cashiers reported sales quadrupled or quintupled).[182] Many farms and dairies lost wholesale restaurant and institutional customers, but some of that output was purchased by retail farms that could otherwise not meet the surge in demand from their own customers.[182] Hundreds of Massachusetts farms started selling direct to consumers online for the first time.[182]

Schools and universitiesEdit

School closures began in early March, when Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced on March 9 that it was moving to only-online classes for the remainder of the spring semester.[183] Also on March 9, two elementary schools in the Plainville school district and one in Arlington were closed for the day due to COVID-19 tests being conducted on two parents and one child.[184] Northeastern University, which had already closed satellite campuses in San Francisco and Seattle, hesitated to close their main campus for fear of international students losing their F visa status. On March 6 the university publicly called on the Department of Homeland Security to grant clemency for international students so the university could close.[185]

On March 10, Harvard University announced that its classes would be online-only for the rest of the spring semester.[186][187][188] The University of Massachusetts Boston informed faculty that they should prepare to teach remotely.[189] Amherst College, located in Western Massachusetts, instructed students on spring break to not return to campus, and moved all classes online for the remainder of the semester.[190] Emerson College, Tufts University, Babson College, Smith College, and Wheaton College all canceled in-person classes and moved classes online.[191]

On March 11, several schools were closed including Hopkinton Public Schools, Loker Elementary and Wayland Middle School, and Clark Avenue Middle School.[192] Northeastern University and Boston University moved all classes online.[191][193][194] On March 14, Northeastern University informed students they would need to vacate their dormitories by 5:00 p.m. on March 17.[195][196] Up to this point students were taking online classes but allowed to remain on university property.[197] Williams College announced it would end in-person classes on Friday, March 13 and move to remote learning beginning Monday, April 6.[198] Boston College moved all classes online, and all students were told to vacate their dorms by March 15.[199] All University of Massachusetts classes moved online until at least April 3.[191] Within a week, many colleges and state school districts announced closures ranging from weeks to months in duration.[200][201]

Wellesley and Framingham closed their public schools and libraries for two weeks on March 13.[202][203][204] Also on March 13, Boston announced that its public schools would close for six weeks from Tuesday, March 17 through April 26.[205]

On March 13, Boston Mayor Walsh announced that Boston Public Schools would be closed starting on March 17 until April 27.[38] On March 15, Governor Baker ordered all schools in Massachusetts closed for three weeks from March 17 through April 7.[48] On March 25, he extended the closing through May 4.[206] On April 21, he extended it to the remainder of the school year.[207]

On March 20, Harvard University declared that its 369th Commencement Exercises would be postponed.[208]

Sports and recreationEdit

Several leagues began postponing or suspending their sports seasons starting March 12, and Major League Baseball canceled the remainder of spring training. On March 16, after the CDC recommended restricting events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks, the major league baseball season was postponed indefinitely.[209] Also on March 12, the National Basketball Association announced the season would be suspended for 30 days.[210] The National Hockey League season was suspended indefinitely.[211] Boston Celtics player Marcus Smart announced on March 18 that he had tested positive for COVID-19, having been tested five days prior.[212]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association canceled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[213] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[214]

The Boston Athletic Association canceled the 2020 Boston Marathon on May 28. In March they had postponed the race, which usually takes place in April, until September. However, Boston Mayor Walsh said on May 28 that "There's no way to hold this usual race format without bringing large numbers of people into close proximity. While our goal and our hope was to make progress in containing the virus and recovering our economy, this kind of event would not be responsible or realistic on September 14 or any time this year." 2020 was the first year in the race's 124 year history that the event was postponed or canceled. Runners will still be able to participate "virtually" in September, and will receive a medal and other items if they send proof that they complete the race in under six hours. Those who qualified for the 2020 marathon will be eligible to compete in the 2021 race.[109]

With many families expecting to spend the summer at home instead of traveling or using public facilities, demand for installation of private backyard pools surged around 20%, and purchases of backyard playground equipment were also up.[215]

StatisticsEdit

Cases in these charts are reported by the date the test was administered, rather than the day the result was recorded. As a result, recent days may have artificially low numbers while tests are processed.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "Weekly COVID-19 Public Health Report". Government of Massachusetts. May 27, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
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  3. ^ a b c "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Cases in MA as of March 22, 2020". Massachusetts Department of Public Health. March 22, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Cases in MA as of March 24, 2020". Massachusetts Department of Public Health. March 24, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Cases in MA as of March 30, 2020". Massachusetts Department of Public Health. March 30, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  6. ^ a b c "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Cases in MA as of April 12, 2020". Massachusetts Department of Public Health. April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c "COVID-19 Dashboard – April 24, 2020". Massachusetts Department of Public Health. April 24, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  8. ^ See Cases by category table.
  9. ^ a b c "MDPH 3/16". Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  10. ^ a b c "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Cases in MA as of March 27, 2020". Massachusetts Department of Public Health. March 27, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c "MDPH 3/13". Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  12. ^ See Cases by county table.
  13. ^ a b c "MDPH 3/12". Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  14. ^ a b c "MDPH 3/9". Archived from the original on March 10, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
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  19. ^ "MDPH 3/7". Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2020.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  20. ^ "MDPH 3/8". Archived from the original on March 9, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2020.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
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  28. ^ a b c d e f g "MDPH COVID-19 Cases, Quarantine, and Monitoring 3/18". Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved April 16, 2020.
  29. ^ a b "MDPH 3/19". Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  30. ^ a b "MDPH 3/20". Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2020.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  31. ^ a b "MDPH 3/21". Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  32. ^ a b "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Cases in MA as of March 23, 2020". Massachusetts Department of Public Health. March 23, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
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