COVID-19 pandemic in Colorado

The COVID-19 pandemic reached Colorado on March 5, 2020, when the state's first two cases were confirmed. As of May 30, 2020, Colorado public health authorities reported 26,098 confirmed cases of COVID-19, an increase of 1331 cases (5.4%) over the previous 3 days, resulting in 4,333 hospitalized patients. Fifty-one deaths have occurred since May 27th, bringing the state's COVID-19 death toll to 1,443. All three of these figures are cumulative, beginning on March 5, 2020.[3]

COVID-19 pandemic in Colorado
COVID-19 Prevalence in Colorado by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in Colorado by confirmed infections per 100,000 people (as of May 31)
  1000+ confirmed infected
  500 - 1000 confirmed infected
  100 - 500 confirmed infected
  20 - 100 confirmed infected
  0 - 20 confirmed infected
Colorado National Guard (49673441472).jpg
CDPHE, Colorado National Guard, and San Miguel County personnel assist at a drive-up testing center in Telluride, Colorado.
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationColorado, U.S.
First outbreakCalifornia[1]
Index caseSummit County, Douglas County
Arrival dateMarch 5, 2020 (2 months, 3 weeks and 6 days ago)
Confirmed cases26,098[2]
Hospitalized cases397 (current)
4,333 (cumulative)[2]
Deaths
1,443[2]
Government website
covid19.colorado.gov

TimelineEdit

COVID-19 cases in Colorado, United States  ()
     Deaths        Active cases
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-05
2(+2)(n.a.) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-06
8(+6)(+300%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-07
8(+0)(+0%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-08
8(+0)(+0%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-09
12(+4)(+50%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-10
17(+5)(+42%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-11
34(+17)(+100%)([a]) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-12
49(+15)(+44%) 0(n.a.)
2020-03-13
77(+28)(+57%) 1(=)
2020-03-14
101(+24)(+31%) 1
2020-03-15
131(+30)(+30%) 1
2020-03-16
160(+29)(+22%) 1
2020-03-17
183(+23)(+14%) 2(+100%)
2020-03-18
216(+33)(+18%) 2
2020-03-19
277(+61)(+28%) 4(+100%)
2020-03-20
363(+86)(+31%) 4
2020-03-21
475(+112)(+31%) 5(+25%)
2020-03-22
591(+116)(+24%) 6(+20%)
2020-03-23
720(+129)(+22%) 7(+17%)
2020-03-24
912(+192)(+27%) 11(+57%)
2020-03-25
1,086(+174)(+19%) 19(+72%)
2020-03-26
1,430(+344)(+31%) 24(+26%)
2020-03-27
1,734(+304)(+21%) 31(+29%)
2020-03-28
2,061(+327)(+19%) 44(+42%)
2020-03-29
2,307(+246)(+12%) 47(+7%)
2020-03-30
2,627(+320)(+14%) 51(+9%)
2020-03-31
2,966(+339)(+13%) 69(+35%)
2020-04-01
3,342(+376)(+13%) 80(+16%)
2020-04-02
3,728(+386)(+12%) 97(+21%)
2020-04-03
4,173(+445)(+12%) 111(+14%)
2020-04-04
4,565(+392)(+9%) 126(+14%)
2020-04-05
4,950(+385)(+8%) 140(+11%)
2020-04-06
5,172(+222)(+4%) 150(+7%)
2020-04-07
5,429(+257)(+5%) 179(+19%)
2020-04-08
5,655(+226)(+4%) 193(+8%)
2020-04-09
6,202(+537)(+10%) 226(+17%)
2020-04-10
6,510(+308)(+5%) 250(+11%)
2020-04-11
6,893(+383)(+6%) 274(+10%)
2020-04-12
7,303(+410)(+6%) 290(+6%)
2020-04-13
7,691(+388)(+5%) 308(+6%)
2020-04-14
7,941(+250)(+3%) 329(+7%)
2020-04-15
8,280(+339)(+4%) 357(+9%)
2020-04-16
8,675(+395)(+5%) 374(+5%)
2020-04-17
9,047(+372)(+4%) 391(+5%)
2020-04-18
9,443(+396)(+4%) 411(+5%)
2020-04-19
9,730(+287)(+3%) 422(+3%)
2020-04-20
10,106(+376)(+4%) 449(+6%)
2020-04-21
10,447(+341)(+3%) 486(+8%)
2020-04-22
10,878(+431)(+4%) 508(+5%)
2020-04-23
11,262(+384)(+4%) 552(+9%)
2020-04-24
12,256(+994) (+9%) 674(+18%)
2020-04-25
12,968(+712) (+5%) 674(+0%)
2020-04-26
13,441(+473) (+4%) 680(+0%)
2020-04-27
13,879(+438) (+3%) 706(+4%)
2020-04-28
14,316(+437) (+3%) 736(+4%)
2020-04-29
14,758(+442) (+3%) 766(+4%)
2020-04-30
15,284(+526) (+4%) 777(+2%)
2020-05-01
15,768(+484) (+3%) 820(+6%)
2020-05-02
16,225(+457) (+3%) 832(+1%)
2020-05-03
16,635(+410) (+2.5%) 842(+1.2%)
2020-05-04
16,907(+272) (+1.6%) 851(+1.1%)
2020-05-05
17,364(+457) (+2.7%) 903(+6.1%)
2020-05-06
17,830(+466) (+2.7%) 921(+2.0%)
2020-05-07
18,371(+541) (+3.0%) 944(+2.5%)
2020-05-08
18,827(+456) (+2.5) 960(+1.7%)
2020-05-09
19,375(+548) (+2.9%) 967(+0.7%)
2020-05-10
19,703(+328) (+1.7%) 971(+0.4%)
2020-05-11
19,879(+176) (+0.9%) 987(+1.6%)
2020-05-12
20,157(+278) (1.4%) 1,009(+2.2%)
2020-05-13
20,475(+318) (1.6%) 1,062(+5.3%)
2020-05-14
20,838(+363) (1.8%) 1,091(+2.7%)
2020-05-15
21,232(+394) (1.9%) 1,150(+5.4%)
2020-05-16
21,633(+401) (1.9%) 1,192(+3.7%)
2020-05-17
21,938(+305) (1.4%) 1,215(+1.9%)
2020-05-18
22,202(+264) (1.2%) 1,224(+0.7%)
2020-05-19
22,482(+280) (1.3%) 1,257(+2.7%)
2020-05-20
22,797(+315) (1.4%) 1,299(+3.3%)
2020-05-21
23,191(+394) (1.7%) 1,310(+0.8%)
2020-05-22
23,487(+296) (1.3%) 1,324(+1.1%)
2020-05-23
23,964(+477) (2.0%) 1,327(+0.2%)
2020-05-24
24,174(+210) (0.87%) 1,332(+0.4%)
2020-05-25
24,269(+95) (0.39%) 1,333(+0.075%)
2020-05-26
24,615(+346) (1.4%) 1,391(+0.37%)
2020-05-27
24,767(+152) (0.6%) 1,392(+0.07%)
2020-05-28
25,121(+354) (1%) 1,421(+2%)
2020-05-29
25,613(+492) (2%) 1,436(+1%)
2020-05-30
26,098(+485) (2%) 1,443(+0.5%)
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in Colorado.

Sources: Daily CDPHE reports,[4] Official Colorado COVID-19 Updates[5][6][7]
Note: Cases include people who test positive for COVID-19 and people who have symptoms of COVID-19 and are a close contact to someone who tested positive[5]


  1. ^ As of this day, there is "one indeterminate case that public health is acting on as a presumptive positive." For this chart, this counts as an active case.

County[a] Cases[b] Deaths Population Cases per 100,000 Ref. & Notes
60 / 64 24,174 1,332 5,695,430 424.4
Adams 2,869 112 511,473 560.93
Alamosa 58 2 16,184 358.38
Arapahoe 4,039 280 651,342 620.10
Archuleta 8 0 13,737 58.24
Baca 12 0 3,547 338.31
Bent 2 0 5,819
Boulder 928 61 325,476 285.12
Broomfield 220 25 69,453 316.76 [c]
Chaffee 70 18 20,028 349.51
Cheyenne 5 0 1,862 268.53
Clear Creek 16 1 9,663 165.58
Conejos 1 0 8,136
Costilla 3 0 3,809
Crowley 62 1 5,857 1,058.56
Custer 2 0 4,928
Delta 67 1 30,936 216.58
Denver 5,173 299 717,797 720.68 [c]
Dolores 0 0 2,053 0
Douglas 675 44 342,842 196.88
Eagle 581 8 54,863 1,059.00
El Paso 1,505 89 714,395 210.67
Elbert 48 2 26,218 183.08
Fremont 26 0 47,912 54.27
Garfield 121 2 59,807 202.32
Gilpin 3 0 6,097
Grand 6 0 15,474 38.77
Gunnison 180 6 17,173 1,048.16
Hinsdale 3 0 804
Huerfano 3 0 6,854
Jackson 0 0 1,396 0
Jefferson 2,040 144 579,491 352.03
Kiowa 0 0 1,373 0
Kit Carson 26 3 7,157 363.28
La Plata 77 1 56,403 136.52
Lake 27 0 7,762 347.85
Larimer 537 21 350,362 153.27
Las Animas 5 0 14,491 34.50
Lincoln 3 0 5,584
Logan 582 3 21,854 2,663.13
Mesa 55 0 153,630 35.80
Mineral 2 0 777
Moffat 6 0 13,181 45.52
Montezuma 35 3 26,159 133.80
Montrose 159 12 42,260 376.24
Morgan 604 41 28,503 2,119.08
Otero 14 1 18,364 76.24
Ouray 8 1 4,798 166.74
Park 23 0 18,557 123.94
Phillips 12 0 4,266 281.29
Pitkin 57 2 17,879 318.81
Prowers 12 0 12,078 99.35
Pueblo 263 14 167,116 157.38
Rio Blanco 1 0 6,305
Rio Grande 16 0 11,226 142.53
Routt 59 6 25,683 229.72
Saguache 25 0 6,837 365.66
San Juan 1 0 762
San Miguel 23 0 8,177 281.28
Sedgwick 0 0 2,275 0
Summit 207 2 30,973 668.32
Teller 32 2 25,060 127.69
Washington 31 0 4,729 655.53
Weld 2,406 125 314,251 765.63
Yuma 15 0 10,029 149.57
Unknown 125 0
Updated May 25, 2020
Data is publicly reported by Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment[8][9]
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case reside, not where they were diagnosed. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported confirmed cases. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ a b Consolidated city-county

MarchEdit

On March 5, public health officials reported the first two cases of coronavirus in the state. The first case was a man in his 30s visiting Summit County who had contact with a confirmed case in California.[10] The second case was an elderly woman in Douglas County who had traveled on an international cruise.[11] Both cases were considered presumptive positives; they had been tested by the state but had not been sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) for verification.[a]

On March 6, with six new cases of coronavirus, the case count climbed to eight, seven of whom had traveled abroad recently.[12]

On March 10, Governor Jared Polis declared a state of emergency. Polis also announced 17 total presumptive positive cases in the state.[13][14] The state announced a drive-up testing facility for patients with a doctor's note in Denver's Lowry neighborhood, at no charge to the patients.[15]

On March 11, The University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) cancelled the 72nd annual Conference on World Affairs.[16] The Nederland Town Board of Trustees cancelled the annual Frozen Dead Guy Days, following a Boulder County Public Health recommendation. The event was scheduled for the weekend of March 13.[17]

On March 12, a Post Malone concert at Denver’s Pepsi Center proceeded as scheduled, drawing a sellout-crowd of 20,000, likely the largest enclosed gathering in the U.S. before widespread lockdowns.[18]

On March 12, a CU Boulder employee received a presumptive positive test for COVID-19. The employee worked on March 9 from 8 a.m. to noon in limited areas of the Center for Community dining center.[19] Despite Boulder County health's recommendations, the annual May Bolder Boulder race and the Boulder Creek Festival were still scheduled.[20] Many major school districts, including Denver Public Schools, Jefferson County Public Schools and Cherry Creek Public Schools, announced closures lasting at least two weeks.[21] Owing to the current strain on medical facilities in mountain communities, Governor Jared Polis discouraged mountain travel for the elderly.[22]

On March 13, Colorado reported its first COVID-19-related death: an 80-year-old woman with underlying health issues from El Paso County.[23][24] To offset the loss of quarantined medical personnel, Governor Jared Polis asked former doctors and nurses to rejoin the stressed medical workforce.[25] Owing to low temperatures, the Lowry drive-up testing service did not operate. The state planned to move the drive-up testing to the Denver Coliseum, starting March 14, subject to weather. The testing at the Coliseum would service a maximum of 150 patients. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) also planned to move the drive-up service to strategic locations as warranted.[26] In Aspen, 10 Australian ski vacationers were confirmed with the virus, with three others refusing testing. The three Australians who refused testing were quarantined for two weeks.[27] Michael Larson, of Crested Butte, in Gunnison County, owner of Mikey's Pizza died from COVID-19, on March 13, 2020. His test for the coronavirus was done post-mortem, and received back on March 23. Making him the first death in Gunnison County, and also one of the first's in Colorado.[28][29]

On March 14, the state legislature went into recess for two weeks.[30][31] Governor Jared Polis issued an executive order to close downhill ski areas for a week, doing so "with a profound sense of pain and grim responsibility." Some ski areas had already planned to close on March 15.[32][33][34][35]

On March 16, Denver Mayor Hancock ordered all bars and restaurants closed by 8 a.m. on March 17 (except for food delivery and pickup) and banned gatherings of more than 50 people.[36] Governor Jared Polis expanded the closures by ordering a state-wide closure of dine-in services, gyms, casinos, and theaters.[37]

On March 18, Governor Jared Polis closed schools until April 17 and banned gatherings of more than 10 people for the following 30 days. Polis also ordered ski resorts to remain closed until April 6.[38] The governor also expressed frustration with nonchalance regarding social distancing and announced the creation of a fund to aid Coloradans affected by COVID-19.[39] San Miguel County became the first county in the nation to plan to test all of its residents. It also ordered residents to "shelter-in-place."[40] Gun sales skyrocket in Colorado, along with toilet paper, and hand sanitizer, thousands of Coloradans are also falling in line with the national trend of stocking up on guns.[41]

On March 19, Colorado reported two more COVID-19-related deaths, one of which was a man related to Colorado's first death.[42] Governor Jared Polis extended the closure of bars, restaurants, theaters, gymnasiums and casinos until April 30 and suspended all nonessential medical procedures. The governor also ordered the closure of "nonessential" businesses until April 30, which include nail salons, spas, and tattoo parlors.[43]

On March 21, Rocky Mountain National Park closed after the mayor of Estes Park cited concerns about the novel coronavirus.[44]

On March 23, Aytu BioScience, a pharmaceutical company in Colorado, announced that it developed a blood test that will deliver results in two to ten minutes at the point of care for antibodies for the COVID-19 virus. The FDA has now approved the test for distribution.[45] Denver Mayor Hancock announced a "stay at home" order for Denver county. This was to go into effect Tuesday March 24 at 5pm.[46]

On March 24, thirteen Colorado counties and multiple cities had announced some form of the stay-at-home order, including Adams County, Arapahoe County, Archuleta County, Boulder County, Broomfield County, Denver County, Douglas County, Eagle County, Grand County, Jefferson County, La Plata County, Pitkin County, and San Miguel County.[47]

On March 25, Governor Jared Polis put the state of Colorado in complete lock-down, with a stay-at-home order. This started on Thursday the twenty-sixth at six in the morning, and was scheduled to last through April 11.[48] Mesa Verde National Park Closed.[49]

On March 26 Mike Willis, Colorado's director of emergency management, had a new coronavirus testing program, after receiving 5,000 test kits and expecting another 2,500. New locations will be set up to test the first responders and health workers. Colorado Parks and Wildlife will be closing all facilities, including camping at Colorado's state parks and State Wildlife Areas until further notice.[50]

On March 27 Governor Jared Polis said that he is working to add 5,000 ICU beds to Colorado's capacity by the end of the summer and is in conversations to bring more ventilators to the state to treat sick COVID-19 patients.[51] The 8pm Denver Howl is started by folks in a neighborhood near the now closed Denver Botanic Gardens and Denver Zoo.[52]

On March 28, Governor Jared Polis announced that the White House had approved his request to declare a major disaster for Colorado. [53] The status means the state is eligible to receive additional federal resources and funding to help address the pandemic.[51] The New York Post named Gunnison County, at 454.20 per 100,000 people and Eagle County at 331.74 per 100,000[54] as being two of the top four counties leading the nation in confirmed cases outside of New York and Louisiana. The other two counties are Blaine County, Idaho and Summit County, Utah. They state that this will no doubt overwhelm local hospitals.[55] Andy Larson of the Salt Lake Tribune did some math based on factual reporting, and put Gunnison County, Colorado third in the country for cases per capita. He listed Eagle County as eighth.[56]

On March 29, CDOT, Colorado Department of Transportation, suspended the Bustang and Outrider through at least April 11.[57]

On March 31, Gunnison County announced they will begin working with a company called Biobot, to test fecal samples from the sewer system, to track coronavirus.[58] The county will collect samples and send them back to Biobot which can produce results in about three days. The tests will help measure the scope of the outbreak in the county and track the impact of interventions, such as social distancing. It could also act as an early warning system for a re-emergence of cases.[59] Colorado Doctors are turning to telemedicine, to keep people out of the hospitals or ERs where their chance at the infection of COVID-19 is higher. Many Health insurance companies will pay the Doctors the same rate for a virtual visit as in-person. Previously, insurance companies only paid about half as much. Also, Medicare may waive co-payments on these visits, making a virtual visit an affordable way to maintain the spread of infection.[60] The demand for guns in Colorado continues to rise amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. Despite the CBI strongly encouraging firearm dealers to hold firearms until the background checks are completed, gun shops are considered essential businesses under the state's stay-at-home order and are classified as "critical retail," along with grocery stores, gas stations, marijuana dispensaries, liquor stores, and several other businesses.[61] Mike Wills, director of the state's Office of Emergency Management, said that Budweiser Events Center could serve as a temporary hospital as Colorado prepares for the coronavirus surge.[62]

At the end of March, the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs eased some of its social distancing measures for its on-campus cadets, after two seniors committed suicide there in the prior week. Earlier strict efforts to isolate and separate cadets had provoked complaints.[63]

AprilEdit

 
Line for a supermarket in Denver

On April 1, Guidelines for patient prioritizing are made, with 3,342 cases, and 620 people hospitalized with COVID-19,[64] Doctors could be forced to decide which patients to treat.[65] About the new guideline, Dr. Matthew Wynia, director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus said, "This is statewide guidance on how to do triage in the most ethically defensible way,"[66] Projections that Colorado will hit its peak of COVID-19 cases on April 17, at which time there could be a shortage of nearly 2,000 hospital beds and nearly 500 intensive care unit beds even with the present preventive measures being taken, there are new efforts that could close that gap.[67]

On April 3, Governor Jared Polis asked Coloradans to wear non-medical, cloth face masks when going out.[68]

 
Mural in Denver

On April 5, Colorado officials set guidelines for deciding who gets care in case of coronavirus surge. Based on a four-tier system, the comprehensive 22-page document will prevent health care workers from making decisions about care based on gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, and other non-health related factors. The document states that decisions should not be made based on a person's status or position.[69] Colorado sees significant declines in air pollution due to a decline in driving during coronavirus outbreak.[70]

On April 6, Colorado's mountain communities are dealing with high altitude issues concerning coronavirus. By moving their patients to lower altitudes, they hope that their patients will need less supplemental oxygen. Dr. Jason Hogan, an emergency medicine physician at Gunnison Valley Health, has started transporting patients from Gunnison, at an altitude of 7,700 feet, to Montrose at 5,800 feet, and Grand Junction at 4,500 feet, to help with the significant amount of oxygen they need. Aspen Valley Hospital's Dr. Barry Hammaker chief medical officer said they are transporting patients to Denver and Grand Junction.[71] Colorado mountain communities due to the high skier/tourist population became hotspots for the new coronavirus early on in the pandemic, closing ski resorts and asking tourists to return home.[72] Governor Jared Polis in a special address extends the stay-at-home order to April 26, 2020. "If there is any way to safely end it sooner, then we will," Polis added. "And likewise if Coloradans aren’t staying at home and the numbers of the dead and dying continue to increase, then it could go longer."[73]

On April 7, tourists and second homeowners could face 18 months in jail or a fine of up to five thousand dollars if they visit Gunnison County in Colorado during the pandemic.[74] Officials initiated the public health order stating non-residents and tourists must stay out to help slow the spread of the virus. In the statement, the public health director said people from lower altitudes were at greater risk for COVID-19 complications than people who live in the high-altitude.[75]

 
Members of the Colorado Air National Guard delivering meals to people staying in a motel in Denver.

On April 9, the Texas attorney general's office wrote a letter to the director of Gunnison county's Department of Health and Human Services, saying that the Colorado county's call for all non-residents to leave the county is unconstitutional. The letter said, “While the order contains other laudable measures aimed at protecting public health, its patent discrimination against non-resident homeowners – including Texans who own homes in Gunnison County – runs afoul of the United States Constitution.” [76] Senator Kerry Donovan, said it's better for people to stay home, where they have a support system in place.[77] The National Western Complex becomes a shelter for homeless men during the COVID-19 pandemic.[78]

On April 10, Attorney General Phil Weiser supports Gunnison County public health order as does Governor Polis' stay-at-home executive order, telling non-residents to leave.[79] The "8 p.m. Howl" was reported to have spread in popularity throughout the entire United States.[80] Started two weeks before, the nightly howl received support from Polis and media coverage.[81]

On April 11, at least 50 employees at a meatpacking plant in Greeley, Colorado have contracted Coronavirus, and two have died. Governor Jared Polis, says that JBS USA would be closed until all workers could be tested. Vice President Mike Pence said that supplies to do so were on their way. “And I want to encourage people in Colorado that we will work to support that effort, but I also want to emphasize that all of the people that are working in the food supply, from farmers to meatpackers to distributors to truckers to grocers, continue to have our gratitude,” Pence said.[82][83]

On April 12, concerns were raised nationally regarding the potential for COVID-19 spreading during April 12 Easter celebrations in churches, though many churches had previously announced the transition to online services in light of this danger.[84]

On April 16, it has been confirmed that Denver Broncos linebacker Von Miller tested positive for the coronavirus.[85]

On April 17, Governor Jared Polis said that the National Guard will be testing 3 Colorado nursing homes for coronavirus.[86]

 
Social distancing at the Air Force Academy graduation ceremony, April 18

On April 18, protests are planned against the stay-at-home order to take place on April 19, at the capitol.[87] To mark the April 18 graduation of cadets from the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs–including the first cadets to commission into the newly-created Space Force–the Air Force Thunderbirds display team released their flight plan for their F-16s to fly along much of the Front Range, from Boulder to Pueblo.[88] The flight is also intended to honor first-responders and essential workers currently helping fight the coronavirus.[89]

On April 19, before Sunday's protest at Colorado State Capitol, Governor Polis informed the public through a spokesperson of Coloradan's right to protest, hoping that those protesting were doing so safely. He also expressed his desire to re-open businesses and by lifting some restrictions within a short period.[90] Health care workers counter demonstrate against protestors at Capitol.[91]

On April 20, a 24-hour shelter was opened at The Denver Coliseum for women and the transgender homeless.[92]

On April 21, the “stay-at-home” order became a “safer-at-home” order as Colorado prepared for its first phase of re-opening.[93]

On April 23, there were still not enough tests, however, more were coming. In the meantime, there were strategies being executed to help combat COVID-19 despite lack of access to testing. Also, a possible blood test that would show antibodies began to show promise.[94] Governor Jared Polis, outlined safer-at-home policies and emphasized that unnecessary travel was still not recommended.[95] Also on April 23, Eagle County was the first in the state to be released from the stay-at-home order following a significant decline in cases in the county. The allowance for Eagle County businesses to re-open and for citizens to travel was restricted to only those within the county and prohibited citizens from elsewhere in the state from traveling to Eagle.[96] JBS meatpacking plant in Greeley, reopened April 24, after being closed for 8 days. Testing will take place for any employee showing symptoms. Weld County Health Department will oversee testing at the plant for morning and evening shifts. Many employees feel unsafe and reluctant to return to work, even with a pay raise and bonus, they said it's just not worth the risk.[97]

On April 24, several counties extended their stay-at-home directives, Governor Jared Polis' order will expire on Sunday, April 26 at which time safer at home will be augmented. Weld County will extend one day until April 27. Adams County, Arapahoe County, Boulder County, Denver County, and Jefferson County will extend their directives until May 8. Grand County will extend until May 21.[98] 138 inmates at Sterling Correctional Facility in Sterling tested positive for COVID-19.[99] A Walmart in Aurora shuts down after a security contractor, an employee and her husband die, with COVID-19. Also, six more employees, of this store tested positive for coronavirus, and three more have symptoms and await test results. The store will clean and sanitize before reopening.[100] Ride the Rockies canceled its annual event. Those who have already paid for the event may receive a refund or automatically be entered in next year's event which plans on using the same route. In June The Denver Post sponsored event will have two virtual rides provided via Zoom.[101]

On April 25, the Colorado National Guard and Colorado State Patrol staffed free drive-through testing for residents of Weld County with COVID-19 symptoms. Testing runs from April 24 through April 28 and does not require doctor's orders. During the four days, testing begins at 10 a.m. and continues until 300 samples are taken.[102] The Greeley Stampede, has been canceled, ticket holders will receive a refund or credit towards the 2021 event.[103]

On April 26, the Aurora Walmart, which was closed due to coronavirus deaths and cases, reopened. The store was cleaned and has new guidelines in place.[104]

MayEdit

On May 1, the Lone Tree city government mandated the wearing of masks when inside retail buildings. The order will be in effect from May 8 through May 26. It has exemptions for children under two years old and persons with breathing difficulties.[105]

On May 15, the Colorado Department of Health began reporting deaths counted two ways. First:

  • "the number of deaths among people with COVID-19. This represents the total number of deaths reported among people who have COVID-19, but COVID-19 may not have been the cause of death listed on the death certificate. This information is required by the CDC and is crucial for public health surveillance, as it provides more information about disease transmission and can help identify risk factors among all deaths across populations."

And, Second:

  • "The number of deaths among people who died from COVID-19: This represents the total number of people whose death was attributed to COVID-19 as indicated on a death certificate. This number is determined by the CDC and is updated daily for dates through the previous Saturday."[106]

Data: Cases and Deaths by DayEdit

Cases Deaths Among Covid 19 Cases Deaths from COVID-19
Date # Cases New cases % Increase # Deaths New Deaths % Increase 7 Day Avg 14 Day Avg # Deaths New Deaths
3/5/20 2 0 0 0 0 0 * *
3/6/20 8 6 300% 0 0 0% * *
3/7/20 8 0 0% 0 0 0% * *
3/8/20 8 0 0% 0 0 0% * *
3/9/20 12 4 50% 0 0 0% * *
3/10/20 17 5 42% 0 0 0% 0 * *
3/11/20 34 17 100% 0 0 0% 0 * *
3/12/20 49 15 44% 0 0 0% 0 * *
3/13/20 77 28 57% 1 1 0% 0 * *
3/14/20 101 24 31% 1 0 0% 0 * *
3/15/20 131 30 30% 1 0 0% 0 * *
3/16/20 160 29 22% 1 0 0% 0 * *
3/17/20 183 23 14% 2 1 100% 0 * *
3/18/20 216 33 18% 2 0 0% 0 * *
3/19/20 277 61 28% 4 2 100% 1 0 * *
3/20/20 363 86 31% 4 0 0% 0 0 * *
3/21/20 475 112 31% 5 1 25% 1 0 * *
3/22/20 591 116 24% 6 1 20% 1 0 * *
3/23/20 720 129 22% 7 1 17% 1 0 * *
3/24/20 912 192 27% 11 4 57% 1 1 * *
3/25/20 1,086 174 19% 19 8 73% 2 1 * *
3/26/20 1,430 344 32% 24 5 26% 3 2 * *
3/27/20 1,734 304 21% 31 7 29% 4 2 * *
3/28/20 2,061 327 19% 44 13 42% 6 3 * *
3/29/20 2,307 246 12% 47 3 7% 6 3 * *
3/30/20 2,627 320 14% 51 4 9% 6 3 * *
3/31/20 2,966 339 13% 69 18 35% 8 5 * *
4/1/20 3,342 376 13% 80 11 16% 9 5 * *
4/2/20 3,728 386 12% 97 17 21% 10 6 * *
4/3/20 4,173 445 12% 111 14 14% 11 7 * *
4/4/20 4,565 392 9% 126 15 14% 12 8 * *
4/5/20 4,950 385 8% 140 14 11% 13 9 * *
4/6/20 5,172 222 4% 150 10 7% 14 10 * *
4/7/20 5,429 257 5% 179 29 19% 16 11 * *
4/8/20 5,655 226 4% 193 14 8% 16 12 * *
4/9/20 6,202 547 10% 226 33 17% 18 14 * *
4/10/20 6,510 308 5% 250 24 11% 20 15 * *
4/11/20 6,893 383 6% 274 24 10% 21 16 * *
4/12/20 7,303 410 6% 290 16 6% 21 16 * *
4/13/20 7,691 388 5% 308 18 6% 23 17 * *
4/14/20 7,941 250 3% 329 21 7% 21 19 * *
4/15/20 8,280 339 4% 357 28 9% 23 19 * *
4/16/20 8,675 395 5% 374 17 5% 21 20 * *
4/17/20 9,047 372 4% 391 17 5% 20 20 * *
4/18/20 9,443 396 4% 411 20 5% 20 20 * *
4/19/20 9,730 287 3% 422 11 3% 19 20 * *
4/20/20 10,106 376 4% 449 27 6% 20 21 * *
4/21/20 10,447 341 3% 486 37 8% 22 22 * *
4/22/20 10,878 431 4% 508 22 5% 22 22 * *
4/23/20 11,262 384 4% 552 44 9% 25 24 * *
4/24/20 12,256 994 9% 674 122 22% 40 30 * *
4/25/20 12,968 712 6% 674 0 0% 38 28 * *
4/26/20 13,441 473 4% 680 6 1% 37 27 * *
4/27/20 13,879 438 3% 706 26 4% 37 28 * *
4/28/20 14,316 437 3% 736 30 4% 36 29 * *
4/29/20 14,758 442 3% 766 30 4% 37 29 * *
4/30/20 15,284 526 4% 777 11 1% 32 28 * *
5/1/20 15,768 484 3% 820 43 6% 21 30 * *
5/2/20 16,225 457 3% 832 12 1% 23 29 * *
5/3/20 16,635 410 3% 842 10 1% 23 29 * *
5/4/20 16,907 272 2% 851 9 1% 21 29 * *
5/5/20 17,364 457 3% 903 52 6% 24 30 * *
5/6/20 17,830 466 3% 921 18 2% 22 29 * *
5/7/20 18,371 541 3% 944 23 2% 24 29 * *
5/8/20 18,827 456 2% 960 16 2% 20 27 * *
5/9/20 19,375 548 3% 967 7 1% 19 20 * *
5/10/20 19,703 328 2% 971 4 0% 18 20 * *
5/11/20 19,879 176 1% 987 16 2% 19 20 * *
5/12/20 20,157 278 1% 1009 22 2% 15 20 * *
5/13/20 20,475 318 2% 1062 53 5% 20 22 * *
5/14/20 20,838 363 2% 1091 29 3% 21 22 * *
5/15/20 21,232 394 2% 1150 59 5% 27 25 878 *
5/16/20 21,633 401 2% 1192 42 4% 32 25 878 0
5/17/20 21,938 305 1% 1215 23 2% 35 26 878 0
5/18/20 22,202 264 1% 1224 9 1% 34 25 921 43
5/19/20 22,482 280 1% 1257 33 3% 35 27 968 47
5/20/20 22,797 315 1% 1299 42 3% 34 26 1001 33
5/21/20 23,191 394 2% 1310 11 1% 31 26 1062 61
5/22/20 23,487 296 1% 1324 14 1% 25 25 1088 26
5/23/20 23,964 477 2% 1327 3 0% 19 24 1088 0
5/24/20 24,174 210 1% 1332 5 0% 17 24 1088 0
5/25/20 24,269 95 0% 1333 1 0% 16 24 1088 0
5/26/20 24,565 296 1% 1352 19 1% 14 24 1114 26
5/27/20 24,767 202 1% 1392 40 3% 13 26 1135 21
5/28/20 25,121 354 1% 1421 29 2% 16 24 1168 33
5/29/20 25,613 492 2% 1436 15 1% 16 23 1181 13
5/30/20 26,098 485 2% 1443 7 0% 17 20 1181 0
5/31/20 26,378 280 1% 1445 2 0% 16 17 1181 0

Source: Daily Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reports. Deaths reflect date the death was reported to the state. [107]

 

Source: Daily CDPHE reports, (Deaths Among COVID19 Cases Statistic) [108]

 

Source: Daily CDPHE reports, [109]

Government responseEdit

 
Members of the Colorado National Guard assisted with testing for COVID-19 at a state veterans' home in Aurora, April 29, 2020.

On March 10, Governor Jared Polis declared a state of emergency, ordering the state's Department of Labor and Employment to develop rules for requiring employees in sectors such as foodservice and health care be offered paid sick leave if they display symptoms.[110] The March 14 executive order to close ski areas for a week was the second most significant action by the governor.[110]

On March 22, Governor Jared Polis ordered non-essential businesses to reduce the number of people physically present in the workplace by 50 percent, and more if possible.[111]

Colorado was set to purchase 500 ventilators before the Federal Emergency Management Agency swooped in and bought them first. Trump announced on Twitter that the federal government would be sending 100 ventilators to Colorado at the request of Senator Cory Gardner.[112] The incident caused Governor Polis to make future supply purchases in secret.[113]

Self-quarantine of government officialsEdit

On March 17, both Senator Cory Gardner and Representative Jason Crow elected to self-quarantine for 14 days, until March 25. Both Gardner and Crow interacted with a Coloradan who tested positive for COVID-19 on March 11. The legislators represented two of 14 members of the U.S. Congress who decided to self-quarantine.[114][115]

On March 19, Colorado State Rep. Dafna Michaelson Jenet reported testing positive for coronavirus. Michaelson Jenet was the first member of the Colorado General Assembly to report testing positive for coronavirus and elected to self-quarantine in her home. Michaelson Jenet was at the Colorado Capitol on March 14, the day it closed due to the virus.[116]

Impact on sportsEdit

 
Billboard in Denver

Most of the state's sports teams were affected by the pandemic. Several leagues began postponing or suspending their seasons starting March 12. Major League Baseball cancelled the remainder of spring training on that date, and on March 16, they announced that the season will be postponed indefinitely, after the recommendations from the CDC to restrict events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks, affecting the Colorado Rockies.[117] Also on March 12, the National Basketball Association announced the season would be suspended for 30 days, affecting the Denver Nuggets.[118]

Colorado AvalancheEdit

The 2019–20 Colorado Avalanche season was suspended for an indefinite amount of time as the National Hockey League suspended the season.[119] After a player on the Ottawa Senators tested positive for coronavirus on March 17, concerns arose about the Avalanche's potential exposure. The Avalanche used the same visitor's locker room at the SAP Center against the San Jose Sharks after the Senators.[120]

College sportsEdit

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association canceled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[121] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[122]

Impact on religionEdit

 
A Catholic church in Denver

ChristianityEdit

On March 12, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints canceled public services worldwide. Other Christian denominations, such as Methodist and evangelical churches, began to close or announce alterations to their schedule around the same date.[123] Highland United Methodist Church in Denver was opened to allow for an assembly line manned by volunteers to produce protective masks in early April.[124] Messiah Baptist Church in Denver received criticism for remaining open. A statement from the church said, "We are NOT canceling any service due to the covid-19 [sic] virus, snow, hail, wind, locust or any other natural or super natural [sic] event with the exception of the rapture. If Christ comes to call us home, whoever is left behind can do what they want."[125][126]

The Salvation Army, Catholic Charities, and Fuel Church organized in April to help deal with the increase in the need for meal donations and food assistance in Colorado Springs. The economic impact of the virus left an increase in donation requests across the state.[127]

Catholic ChurchEdit

The Catholic Archdiocese of Denver began cancelling public services in March, including cancelling Sunday Mass through April 17. Holy Week Masses were moved to live-streams from each parish, as well as Masses featuring Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila. The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults was moved to the 30 May Pentecost Vigil.[128]

In the Diocese of Pueblo, Bishop Stephen Jay Berg offered dispensation for those who were experiencing flu-like symptoms in early March. On Sunday, March 8, parishes in the diocese stopped filling Holy Water fonts and stopped offering the eucharistic Blood of Christ in the chalice.[129] On March 13, the diocese cancelled all Masses following Governor Polis banning all public gatherings of 250 people or more and closed the schools operated by the diocese.[130] March 13 announcement, made by the Archdiocese of Denver, affected the entire ecclesiastical Province of Denver, including the Diocese of Colorado Springs.[131]

On April 12, the Easter Mass held at Denver's Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception was broadcast live by KDVR.[132] A spokesperson for the archdiocese described participating in Easter celebrations from home as an act of charity.[84]

Episcopal ChurchEdit

The Episcopal Church in Colorado, the sole Episcopal diocese in the state, released a statement for Bishop Kimberly Lucas on the pandemic on March 13. The statement announced the cessation of public services on March 22 to last until April 1, with congregations in more heavily affected areas–which the Bishop cited as Denver, Pitkin, and Eagle counties–to immediately stop offering services.[133] Beginning Sunday, March 15, Episcopalian parishes began using live-streaming services to allow congregants to watch from home upon the recommendation of Reverend Canon Carl M. Andrews, the diocese's Disaster Response Director.[134]

JudaismEdit

Temple Emanuel in Pueblo had already cancelled its Passover Seder events in April when a suspected arson attack on March 11 destroyed much of the interior of the building.[129][135] Most other synagogues in Colorado had cancelled their public events and services by March 19. Some Jewish schools, such as Garden Preschool in Lone Tree, began using video communication to interact with students.[136] Temple Emanuel in Denver offered online courses on how to parent and educate students during the pandemic.[137]

IslamEdit

In late April, celebrations of Ramadan began with alterations. Some in the Colorado Muslim community express concerns that immigrants that were only able to communicate with others at their local mosque would find the “stay-at-home” period particularly trying. The Downtown Denver Islamic Center announced it would provide online courses throughout Ramadan.[138]

TestingEdit

 
Drive-up testing site in Telluride. March 17, 2020.

Despite the urgency for testing Coloradans for COVID-19, many people have been frustrated with the state's limited testing capacity and slow response time.[139] Governor Jared Polis has noted that expanding testing capacity is "absolutely critical", yet limited supplies and a small number of trained medical staff have resulted in a low testing rate.[139] While CDPHE implemented a mobile testing site in Lowry, Denver (later moved to the Denver Colosseum), the site closed due to long lines.[140] As of March 18, no private laboratories were performing tests[139] and only people who exhibited the most severe symptoms were being prioritized for testing.[141] While some tests can be completed in a matter of minutes, Colorado's test results have taken up to five days.[139]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The state later moved to consider presumptive positive cases as positive, without requiring additional verification from the CDC.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Johnson, Dacia; Erin Powell. "Man visiting Colorado, woman in DougCo test positive for coronavirus". KUSA.
  2. ^ a b c "Data". Colorado COVID-19 Updates. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  3. ^ "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Colorado". Department of Public Health and Environment. January 24, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  4. ^ "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Colorado". Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Data". Colorado COVID-19 Updates. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  6. ^ "COVID - 19 Colorado Case Summary" (PDF). March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  7. ^ "Colorado COVID-19 Website Data". April 17, 2020. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  8. ^ "Case data - Colorado COVID-19 Updates". Colorado - Official State Web Portal. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  9. ^ "Colorado COVID-19 Positive Cases and Rates of Infection by County of Identification". Colorado Department of Public Health. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  10. ^ Johnson, Dacia (March 5, 2020). "Man visiting Colorado tests positive for coronavirus". KUSA. Retrieved March 5, 2020.
  11. ^ Ruble, Eric (March 5, 2020). "Second 'presumptive positive' Colorado coronavirus case is Douglas County woman who traveled internationally". Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  12. ^ Wingerter, Meg. "Colorado coronavirus count hits 8 with new patients in Denver and Douglas, El Paso, Eagle counties". CanonCity Daily Record. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  13. ^ Ziegler, Suzie (March 10, 2020). "Gov. Polis declares state of emergency due to COVID-19". KRDO. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  14. ^ Roberts, Michael (March 11, 2020). "Polis COVID-19 Update: We May Be at Tipping Point for Spread in Denver". Westword. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  15. ^ CBS Denver. "Coronavirus Drive-Up Testing Underway In Denver's Lowry Neighborhood". CBS Denver. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  16. ^ Langford, Katie (March 11, 2020). "CU Boulder cancels Conference on World Affairs, citing coronavirus". Boulder Daily Camera. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  17. ^ Calhoun, Patricia (March 12, 2020). "Events on Ice: Frozen Dead Guy Days Canceled". Westword. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  18. ^ "Colorado COVID-19 Timeline". ColoradoBiz. 47: 21. May–June 2020.
  19. ^ "CU Boulder confirms employee tested presumptive positive for COVID-19". Boulder Daily Camera. March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  20. ^ Brennan, Charlie (March 12, 2020). "Boulder County health recommends canceling Bolder Boulder, Creek Fest". Broomfield Enterprise. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  21. ^ "Colorado schools closed because of coronavirus". March 11, 2020.
  22. ^ "As schools close, Colorado prepares to shift coronavirus response to focus on softening impacts". March 13, 2020.
  23. ^ Paul, Jesse (March 13, 2020). "Colorado announces its first death from the coronavirus". The Colorado Sun. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  24. ^ "Colorado has first death from COVID-19 in El Paso County". Department of Public Health and Environment. March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  25. ^ "New York, Colorado governors call on "former" doctors, nurses to rejoin workforce amid coronavirus pandemic". cbsnews.com. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  26. ^ "Colorado's drive-thru coronavirus lab will move to the Denver Coliseum". The Denver Post. March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  27. ^ Bourke, Latika (March 13, 2020). "Australians in Colorado refuse test for virus despite confirmed cases". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  28. ^ "Lockdown: week two". Gunnison County Times. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  29. ^ Reaman, Mark. "County reports one death related to COVID-19". Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  30. ^ Paul, Jesse; Frank, John (March 13, 2020). "Colorado legislature will shut down on Saturday for 2 weeks because of coronavirus". The Colorado Sun. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  31. ^ "Coronavirus pandemic shuts down Colorado Capitol for at least two weeks". The Denver Post. March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  32. ^ "Colorado governor orders all ski resorts to close for at least a week in extraordinary move". The Colorado Sun. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  33. ^ "Gov. Polis issues executive order closing all Colorado ski areas for one week". KUSA. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  34. ^ Boster, Seth (March 14, 2020). "Gov. Polis orders Colorado ski resorts to temporarily close". Colorado Springs Gazette. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  35. ^ "Coronavirus cases in Colorado rise to 131". The Denver Post. March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  36. ^ Oravetz, Janet. "All Denver restaurants and bars ordered to close to indoor dining for 8 weeks". NBC – 9News. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  37. ^ Wingerter, Meg. "Colorado governor orders bars, restaurants to halt dine-in service statewide in fight against coronavirus". The Denver Post. The Denver Post. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  38. ^ Birkeland, Bente (March 18, 2020). "Polis Closes All Of Colorado's Schools Until April 17, Bans Gatherings of More Than 10 People". Colorado Public Radio. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  39. ^ Colorado Public Radio Staff (March 18, 2020). ""Please Don't Be Stupid," Polis Says To Coloradans, About The Coronavirus". Colorado Public Radio. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  40. ^ "San Miguel County shelter-in-place orders, will be 1st in the U.S. to test entire County with UBI's blood test". KKTV 11 News. March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  41. ^ "Coronavirus In Colorado Prompts Run On Guns, Ammunition – CBS Denver". Denver.cbslocal.com. March 18, 2020. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  42. ^ Tabachnik, Sam (March 19, 2020). "2 new coronavirus-related deaths reported in Colorado as confirmed cases rise to 277". The Denver Post. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  43. ^ Zalubowski, David (March 19, 2020). "Polis suspends all nonessential medical procedures in Colorado, extends restaurant and bar closure to April 30". The Denver Post. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  44. ^ Meyer, John (March 20, 2020). "Rocky Mountain National Park closes amid coronavirus outbreak at the request of mayor, local health department". The Denver Post.
  45. ^ "Colorado Company Develops Rapid Test For New Coronavirus". Littleton, CO Patch. March 23, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  46. ^ "Here's what Denver's new stay at home orders mean". March 23, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  47. ^ "List: All the Colorado cities and counties that have announced stay-at-home orders". March 24, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  48. ^ Staff (April 6, 2020). "In Colorado's mountain towns, high altitude presents a unique challenge in treating coronavirus". thedenverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  49. ^ "Mesa Verde National Park Operational Updates Due to the Novel (New) Coronavirus (COVID-19) – Mesa Verde National Park (U.S. National Park Service)". Nps.gov. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  50. ^ Tabachnik, Sam (March 26, 2020). "Coronavirus testing program for health care workers, first responders in Colorado". Denverpost.com. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  51. ^ a b "Coronavirus latest updates in Colorado: March 30". 9news.com. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  52. ^ "Why people keep hearing howling at 8 p.m. across Denver". Theknow.denverpost.com. April 7, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  53. ^ "Trump Approves Colorado's Major Disaster Declaration". denverpost.com. Denver Post. January 20, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  54. ^ "Case data | Colorado COVID-19 Updates". Covid19.colorado.gov. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  55. ^ Connelly, Eileen AJ (January 1, 1970). "Coronavirus cases climb in rural US cities popular with tourists". Nypost.com. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  56. ^ "Andy Larsen: So just how bad is it in Summit County? Here's what the coronavirus numbers show". The Salt Lake Tribune.
  57. ^ Bradbury, Shelly (March 29, 2020). "CDOT suspends Bustang, Outrider bus service in Colorado due to coronavirus". Denverpost.com. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  58. ^ "Colorado county to test sewage for coronavirus". 9news.com. March 31, 2020. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  59. ^ "Gunnison County will test fecal samples from the sewer system to track coronavirus". thedenverchannel.com. March 31, 2020.
  60. ^ Wingerter, Meg (March 31, 2020). "Colorado doctors turning to telemedicine as coronavirus concerns keep patients away". Denverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  61. ^ Bradbury, Shelly (March 31, 2020). "Amid coronavirus pandemic, Colorado gun sales continue to surge". Denverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  62. ^ Tabachnik, Sam (March 31, 2020). "Loveland arena could become a temporary hospital". Denverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  63. ^ Roeder, Tom (March 31, 2020). "Air Force Academy relaxes rules, focuses on cadet mental health after suicides". The Gazette. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  64. ^ "Case data | Colorado COVID-19 Updates". Covid19.colorado.gov. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  65. ^ Choi, Candice (March 30, 2020). "Amid coronavirus pandemic, how would be overwhelmed hospitals decide who to treat first? – The Denver Post". Denverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  66. ^ Aguilar, John (April 1, 2020). "Colorado readies guidelines for prioritizing coronavirus patient care in case of hospital overload". Denverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  67. ^ "COVID-19". Covid19.healthdata.org. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  68. ^ Denton, Robert (April 3, 2020). "Coronavirus in Colorado, April 3 updates". Denverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  69. ^ Bradbury, Shelly (May 23, 2016). "Colorado officials set guidelines for prioritizing patient care in case of coronavirus surge". Denverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  70. ^ Finley, Bruce (April 6, 2020). "Colorado sees "significant declines" in air pollution as coronavirus ramps down driving, industrial activity". Denverpost.com.
  71. ^ Seaman, Jessica (April 6, 2020). "In Colorado's mountain towns, high altitude presents a unique challenge in treating coronavirus". Denverpost.com.
  72. ^ Murray, Jon (March 13, 2020). "Colorado's decision to shut down ski resorts over coronavirus seems obvious now. Should it have come sooner?". Denverpost.com.
  73. ^ Burness, Alex. "Colorado Gov. Jared Polis extends statewide stay-at-home order to April 26". Denverpost.com. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  74. ^ Gunnison County Department of Health and Human Services. "FIFTH AMENDED STANDING PUBLIC HEALTH ORDER PROHIBITING OR IMPOSING ADDITIONAL RESTRICTIONS ON CERTAIN EVENTS, GATHERINGS, BUSINESS OPERATIONS AND OTHER ACTIVITIES, PROHIBITING NON-RESIDENTS (INCLUDING NON-RESIDENT HOMEOWNERS) AND IMPOSING LIMITED QUARANTINE ON CERTAIN OUT-OF-COUNTY TRAVELERS TO LIMIT AND CONTAIN THE SPREAD OF THE COVID-19 VIRUS" (PDF). Gunnison County Colorado Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved April 3, 2020.
  75. ^ Miller, Joshua Rhett (April 7, 2020). "Colorado county threatens tourists with fines, jail time amid coronavirus crisis". New York Post. Retrieved April 7, 2020.
  76. ^ Schuetz, R.A. (April 9, 2020). "A Colorado ski county wants nonresidents out. The Texas attorney general cries foul". HOUSTON CHRONICLE. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  77. ^ Bente Birkeland. "Texas Attorney General Says Gunnison County's Temporary Nonresident Ban Is Unconstitutional". CPR News. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  78. ^ Beaty, Kevin; Bryson, Donna. "Just looking at the National Western emergency shelter puts Denver's housing crisis into perspective". Denverite. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  79. ^ Keith, Tony (April 10, 2020). "' don't Mess with Colorado': Colorado's attorney general stands behind Gunnison County for public health order telling non-residents to leave". KKTV 11 NEWS.
  80. ^ The Associated Press. "The Howling: Americans Let It Out From Depths of Pandemic – The New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  81. ^ "Why people keep hearing howling at 8 p.m. across Denver". The Denver Post. Theknow.denverpost.com. April 7, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  82. ^ CNN Wire. "Colorado meat packing plant closed after dozens of employees test positive for COVID-19". KTLA5. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  83. ^ Almasy, Steve; Razel, Raja. "Colorado meat packing plant with thousands of employees closed after coronavirus outbreak". CNN. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  84. ^ a b Mitchell, Kirk (April 11, 2020). "2020 Easter services switch from sunrise gatherings to private moments at home". The Denver Post. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  85. ^ "Denver Broncos Linebacker Von Miller Has Coronavirus". CBS4 Denver. April 16, 2020. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  86. ^ Henderson, Liz. "Coronavirus in Colorado: National Guard will conduct testing in three of state's largest nursing homes". The Gazette. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  87. ^ Fisher, Amber (April 18, 2020). "Rally Planned At CO State Capitol To Protest Stay-At-Home Order". Patch. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  88. ^ "17 April 2020 Tweet". Air Force Thunderbirds Twitter Account. Twitter. April 17, 2020. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  89. ^ Streetman, Audra (April 17, 2020). "Air Force Thunderbirds Release Colorado Flyover Flight Plan For Saturday". CBS4 Denver. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  90. ^ Garrison, Robert (April 19, 2020). "'Liberate Colorado:' Large crowds gather at State Capitol to protest COVID-19 stay-at-home". TheDenverChannel.com. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  91. ^ Zhao, Christina. "Colorado Health Care Workers Confront Protesters Amid Demonstration Against Stay-at-Home Orders". Newsweek. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  92. ^ Bryson, Donna (April 20, 2020). "The Denver Coliseum is now a 24-hour shelter for women experiencing homelessness". Denverite. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  93. ^ Miller, Blair (April 20, 2020). "Gov. Polis outlines plan to lift Colorado stay-at-home order". THEDENVERCHANNEL.COM. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  94. ^ Daley, John; Brasch, Sam. "Why Colorado Can't Get Enough Coronavirus Tests — And Why It's Starting To Reopen Anyway". CPR News. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  95. ^ Hindi, Saja; Sebastian, Matt (April 23, 2020). "AQ about new "safer at home" phase of Colorado's coronavirus response". The Denver Post. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  96. ^ LaConte, John (April 23, 2020). "Eagle County Receives Relief from Colorado Stay-At-Home Order". Vail Daily. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  97. ^ Gutierrez, Sonia. "As JBS plant in Greeley prepares to reopen, some employees say they're afraid to return to work". 9NEWS. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  98. ^ Web Staff. "Multiple counties in Colorado extend stay-at-home orders: Full list". FoxDenver31 – Colorado's own 2News. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  99. ^ Carroll, Jenna. "Over 100 inmates test positive for COVID-19 at Sterling Correctional Facility". FoxDenver31 – Colorado's own 2News. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  100. ^ Meyersohn, Nathaniel. "Walmart store in Colorado shuts down after coronavirus deaths". CNN Business. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  101. ^ Livingston John Herald Sports Editor. "Ride the Rockies cycling tour hits the brakes until 2021". The Journal. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  102. ^ Ziegler, Susie. "State of Colorado opens Weld County testing facility for any resident with symptoms of COVID-19". Retrieved April 25, 2020.
  103. ^ High, Lucas. "Greeley Stampede cancels 2020 rodeo, music festival". Retrieved April 25, 2020.
  104. ^ Garrison, Robert. "Aurora Walmart allowed to reopen after order to close in wake of COVID-19 outbreak, 3 deaths". TheDenver Channel.com. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  105. ^ "As Retail Businesses Reopen, City Issues Order Requiring Cloth Face Coverings to Protect Employees and Patrons" (PDF). City of Lone Tree. May 1, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  106. ^ https://covid19.colorado.gov/data/case-data
  107. ^ "CDPHE COVID19 Daily State Statistics". Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  108. ^ "CDPHE COVID19 Daily State Statistics". Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  109. ^ "CDPHE COVID19 Daily State Statistics". Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  110. ^ a b Ingold, John; Paul, Jesse (March 10, 2020). "Gov. Jared Polis declares state of emergency in response to coronavirus outbreak". The Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on March 10, 2020. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  111. ^ Burdick, Dave; Schimel, Kate. "Polis Says State Won't Enforce Social Distancing But 'Grim Reaper' Will, As State Orders More Working From Home". Colorado Public Radio. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  112. ^ Wingerter, Justin (April 8, 2020). "Feds sending 100 ventilators to Colorado, Trump says". The Denver Post. Archived from the original on April 22, 2020. Retrieved May 6, 2020. FEMA bought 500 ventilators out from under state, governor said last week
  113. ^ Morfitt, Karen (May 1, 2020). "'It's A Global Free For All': Gov. Polis Says He's Making Coronavirus Supply Purchases In Secret". CBS4 Denver. Denver, Colorado. Archived from the original on May 3, 2020. Retrieved May 5, 2020. Last month the governor made claims that FEMA swooped in to obtain ventilators he thought were coming to Colorado. He says now they’re careful to keep all purchases under wraps.
  114. ^ Luning, Ernest (March 17, 2020). "U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner to self-quarantine following contact with infected Coloradan". Colorado Politics. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  115. ^ Luning, Ernest (March 17, 2020). "U.S. Rep. Jason Crow to self-quarantine after coronavirus contact". Colorado Politics. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  116. ^ Paul, Jesse (March 19, 2020). "Colorado lawmaker tests positive for coronavirus, has mild symptoms". The Colorado Sun. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  117. ^ Feinsand, Mark (March 16, 2020). "Opening of regular season to be pushed back". MLB.com. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  118. ^ "Silver: NBA hiatus likely to last 'at least' 30 days". ESPN.com. March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  119. ^ NHL statement on coronavirus NHL, March 12, 2020
  120. ^ Chambers, Mike (March 18, 2020). "Avalanche might have been exposed to coronavirus in San Jose". The Denver Post. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  121. ^ NCAA cancels remaining winter and spring championships NCAA, March 12, 2020,
  122. ^ NJCAA cancels spring sports, basketball nationals amid coronavirus outbreak MLive.com, March 16, 2020,
  123. ^ Julig, Carina (March 14, 2020). "In response to coronavirus outbreak, Loveland's churches balance faith with caution". Loveland Reporter Herald. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  124. ^ Kovaleski, Jennifer (April 3, 2020). "Denver leaders use local church to make homemade masks, provide work for unemployed". Denver7 News. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  125. ^ "Home Page". Messiah Baptist Church. Archived from the original on April 8, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  126. ^ Jojola, Jeremy (April 2, 2020). "Some churches stay open despite being urged to go online". 9News.com. 9News. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  127. ^ "Catholic Charities, The Salvation Army, and Fuel Church feeds Colorado Springs community in April". Fox21News. April 3, 2020. Retrieved April 25, 2020.
  128. ^ Haas, Mark (March 26, 2020). "What Colorado's 'Stay-at-Home' order means for parishes". Denver Catholic. Archdiocese of Denver. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  129. ^ a b Mestas, Anthony A. (March 9, 2020). "Pueblo religious institutions brace for coronavirus". The Pueblo Chieftain. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  130. ^ "Statement of the Diocese of Pueblo on the Cancelation of Public Masses". Roman Catholic Diocese of Pueblo. March 13, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  131. ^ Angela Case (March 13, 2020). "Colorado Catholic dioceses cancel all Masses; New Life switches to online services". FOX21News. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  132. ^ Flynn, Colleen (April 6, 2020). "Watch Easter Sunday Mass on FOX31, Channel 2 and streaming online". KDVR.com. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  133. ^ Bishop Kym Lucas (March 13, 2020). "A Message from Bishop Kym Lucas: Being Church Together". The Episcopal Church in Colorado. Archived from the original on April 8, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  134. ^ "COVID 19 Response". Good Sheered Episcopal Church. March 13, 2020. Archived from the original on April 8, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  135. ^ Kerridge, Kasia (March 11, 2020). "Arson investigation underway at Temple Emanuel in Pueblo". KKTV11News. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  136. ^ Hankin, Larry; Goldberg, Shana (March 19, 2020). "Coronavirus: What's on — or replaced". Intermountain Jewish News. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  137. ^ "Parenting in the Age of COVID (Online Session)". emanueldenver.org. Temple Emanuel Denver. March 25, 2020. Archived from the original on April 8, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  138. ^ Sanchez, Hayley (April 24, 2020). "Ramadan In The Age Of Coronavirus: Some Colorado Muslims View Isolation As An Opportunity To Grow In Their Faith". Colorado Public Radio News. Retrieved April 25, 2020.
  139. ^ a b c d Low, Rob (March 19, 2020). "Frustrations rise over few coronavirus testing options in Colorado". FOX31 Denver. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  140. ^ Allen, Emily (March 17, 2020). "Drive-Up coronavirus test lab in Denver metro remains closed". FOX31 Denver. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  141. ^ Miller, Blair (March 18, 2020). "Colorado COVID-19 tests prioritized for most at-risk & health care workers; state launches new tracking site". KMGH. Retrieved March 19, 2020.

External linksEdit