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The green centre and west, north and east façades of some of the Square's homes and the portico and cupola of the church on the horizon after the rectangle has narrowed to form Wyndham Place.
A map showing the Bryanston Square ward of St Marylebone Metropolitan Borough as it appeared in 1916.

Bryanston Square is a long, rectangular, terraced square in Marylebone, Westminster, London, originally of 50 sequentially numbered houses. (Some of them have subsequently been combined in bigger units, such as the Swiss Embassy.) The Bryanston suburb of Johannesburg, South Africa, is named after Bryanston Square.[1]

Amenities and neighboursEdit

Wyndham PlaceEdit

Wyndham Place leads from the short, northern end of Bryanston Square to the Church of St Mary's, an 1821 Grade I listed building by Robert Smirke.

Great Cumberland PlaceEdit

A similar distance to the south along its southern narrowed continuation, broadening in the middle into a small crescent is Western Marble Arch Synagogue. The projection is Great Cumberland Place which is approximately one third of the width as measured from building to building. The thoroughfare culminates with the Marble Arch before which the street is flanked by Cumberland Court and the Cumberland Hotel which incorporates the tube station. Its uses vary between residential use and hotel use.

Architectural context and featuresEdit

Beyond half of its mews is Montagu Square to the east and beyond a few similarly ornate streets is the Paddington and Marylebone-dividing Edgware Road. Bryanston Square is of approximately equal area to Portman Square. It has wide roads, many buildings of which have listed status, and a private tree-lined garden. Wetherby Preparatory School occupies part of the block from the south west corner. Listed are:

  • Numbers 25–26[2]
  • Numbers 28–32[3]
  • Numbers 44–48[4]

Colour and height and neat façades make the square geometric and yet differentiated. Slightly varied yellowy-brown brickwork from address to address (historically referred to as 'yellow bricks') is accompanied in by differing mansard roofs, mostly of grey slate—a minority is of red-brown bricks. Decorative black balconies above the first level are accompanied by a white chamfered band course at the penultimate level before the mansard. At the divide of the mansards or parapet roofs with roof gardens is a longer such course forming a more pronounced white band course which is a cornice. All of the casements are tall white, multi-pane sash windows of uniform height and distribution.[2][3][4]

In the south is the William Pitt Byrne Memorial Fountain, erected in 1862, a Grade II (initial category) listed monument under the statutory protection scheme,[5] as is an ornamental water pump at the opposite end.[6] Two other buildings form the bulk of the equally interrupted southern façade, listed, 63 and 68 George Street.

Ambassadorial presenceEdit

HistoryEdit

Named after its founder Henry William Portman's home village of Bryanston in Dorset, it was built as part of the Portman Estate between 1810 and 1815, along with Montagu Square beyond a mews to the east.

Notable peopleEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Number 38 was demolished in 1940 due to damage during the blitz[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The History of Bryanston | The Heritage Portal". www.theheritageportal.co.za. Retrieved 19 June 2018.
  2. ^ a b Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1066353)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.
  3. ^ a b Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1066354)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.
  4. ^ a b Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1066355)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.
  5. ^ "William Pitt Byrne Memorial Fountain, Paddington". British Listed Buildings Online. Retrieved 1 March 2011.
  6. ^ Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1066357)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 March 2015.
  7. ^ "Shaw-Lefevre, George John (SHW849GJ)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  8. ^ Maryna Fraser, ‘Bailey, Sir Abraham , first baronet (1864–1940)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 25 Aug 2008
  9. ^ Abe Bailey Biography

External linksEdit