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Bryan Cogman is an American television writer and producer. He is known for writing ten episodes of the HBO series Game of Thrones: in season 1, "Cripples, Bastards, and Broken Things"; in season 2, "What Is Dead May Never Die"; in season 3, "Kissed by Fire"; in season 4, "Oathkeeper" and "The Laws of Gods and Men"; in season 5, "Kill the Boy" and "Unbowed, Unbent, Unbroken"; in season 6, "Blood of My Blood" and "The Broken Man"; and in season 7, "Stormborn".[citation needed] He is the author of the book Inside HBO's Game of Thrones which features a preface by A Song of Ice and Fire author George R. R. Martin.[citation needed]

Bryan Cogman
Bryan Cogman Fan Photograph (cropped).jpg
Cogman at a Game of Thrones gathering in 2011.
Born (1979-07-25) July 25, 1979 (age 38)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S.
Nationality American
Occupation Television writer, television producer

Contents

Life and careerEdit

He was educated at the Juilliard School and graduated with a B.F.A. in Acting.[citation needed]

In 2014, Cogman was hired by 20th Century Fox to write a feature film based on characters and stories from Magic: The Gathering,[1] a popular fantasy trading card game.

In 2015, it was announced he would pen the live-action remake of The Sword in the Stone for Disney.[citation needed]

Cogman's work has been profiled by Rolling Stone[2] and lauded in the blogosphere.[3][4]

In September 2017, Cogman was announced as a creator of a developing fifth Game of Thrones prequel series.[5]

FilmographyEdit

FilmEdit

Year Title Credited as Notes
2019 The Sword in the Stone Screenwriter Disney's upcoming streaming service exclusive

TelevisionEdit

Year Title Writer Producer Director Notes
2011–present Game of Thrones Yes Yes Wrote: 10 episodes
Dragonstone waiter (uncredited cameo in "The Lion and the Rose")
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series (2015-2016)[6]
Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form (2012)[7]
Producers Guild of America Award for Best Episodic Drama (2015)[8]
Nominated—Writers Guild of America Award for Dramatic Series (2011-2012, 2014-2016)[9][10][11][12][13]
Nominated—Producers Guild of America Award for Best Episodic Drama (2016, 2018)[14][15]
Pending—Writers Guild of America Award for Dramatic Series (2018)[16]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Fleming, Jr, Mike (June 12, 2014). "'Game Of Thrones' Scribe Bryan Cogman Takes On 'Magic The Gathering' For Fox". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 12, 2014. 
  2. ^ 'Game of Thrones' Recap: Can We Talk? | Movies News | Rolling Stone
  3. ^ 'Game of Thrones' Story Editor Bryan Cogman on Brienne of Tarth, Sexposition, and Women In Fantasy | ThinkProgress
  4. ^ Maureen Ryan: 'Game of Thrones' Recap: The Night Is Dark And Full Of Terrors
  5. ^ Khosla, Proma. "We've finally got some details on one of the proposed 'Game of Thrones' spinoffs-- and fans are sure to be excited". Mashable. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  6. ^ "Game of Thrones". Emmys.com. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  7. ^ "2012 Hugo Award Winners". World Science Fiction Society. September 2, 2012. Archived from the original on September 3, 2012. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  8. ^ "'Big Short' takes home top prize at Producers Guild of America awards". Fox News. January 24, 2016. Archived from the original on April 6, 2016. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  9. ^ A. Fernandez, Jay (February 19, 2012). "Writers Guild Awards: Complete Winners List". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 19, 2012. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  10. ^ "WGA Announces TV Nominations". The Hollywood Reporter. December 6, 2012. Archived from the original on December 6, 2012. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  11. ^ Hipes, Patrick (December 4, 2014). "Writers Guild TV Nominations: 'True Detective' & 'Louie' Lead Way, Amazon Breaks Through With 'Transparent'". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on February 15, 2015. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  12. ^ McNary, Dave (February 13, 2016). "WGA Honors 'Big Short,' 'Spotlight,' 'Mad Men' at 68th Awards". Variety. Archived from the original on May 3, 2016. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  13. ^ O'Connell, Michael (December 5, 2016). "WGA TV Nominations Include 'Westworld,' 'This Is Us' and 'Stranger Things'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 6, 2017. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  14. ^ DeSantis, Rachel (January 5, 2017). "People v. O.J., Stranger Things score Producers Guild Award nominations". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on January 6, 2017. Retrieved April 12, 2017. 
  15. ^ Dupre, Elyse (5 January 2018). "2018 Producers Guild Award Nominations: The Full List of Film and TV Nominees". E! News. Retrieved 5 January 2018. 
  16. ^ Littleton, Cynthia. "Writers Guild Award TV Nominations: 'The Americans,' 'Handmaid's Tale,' 'GLOW' Grab Multiple Mentions". Variety. Retrieved December 7, 2017. 

External linksEdit