Bruce Crawford

Robert Hardie Bruce Crawford (born 16 February 1955) is a Scottish National Party (SNP) politician who served as Cabinet Secretary for Parliamentary Business and Government Strategy from 2011 to 2012, having held the junior ministerial position of Minister for Parliamentary Business from 2007 to 2011. Crawford served as the Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) for Stirling from 2007 to 2021, having previously represented the Mid Scotland and Fife region 1999–2007.

Bruce Crawford
BruceCrawfordMSP20110509.JPG
Cabinet Secretary for Parliamentary Business and Government Strategy
In office
19 May 2011 – 5 September 2012
First MinisterAlex Salmond
Preceded byMargaret Curran (2007)
Succeeded byMichael Russell (2018)
Minister for Parliamentary Business
In office
17 May 2007 – 19 May 2011
First MinisterAlex Salmond
Preceded byGeorge Lyon
Succeeded byBrian Adam
Member of the Scottish Parliament
for Stirling
In office
3 May 2007 – 5 May 2021
Preceded bySylvia Jackson
Succeeded byEvelyn Tweed
Member of the Scottish Parliament
for Mid Scotland and Fife
In office
6 May 1999 – 3 May 2007
Personal details
Born (1955-02-16) 16 February 1955 (age 67)
Perth, Scotland
Political partyScottish National Party
SpouseJacqueline Crawford

BackgroundEdit

Crawford was born in Perth. Prior to entering politics, he was a human resource manager with the Scottish Office.[citation needed]

Political careerEdit

Perth CouncilEdit

Crawford served as councillor for Kinross on Perth and Kinross District Council from 1988 to 1996 and on Perth and Kinross Council from 1995 to 2001.[1] Crawford was also Leader of Perth and Kinross Council from 1995 to 1999.

In opposition in Scottish ParliamentEdit

He was elected to the Scottish Parliament to represent Mid Scotland and Fife at the 1999 election.[2] He was re-elected in 2003.[3] He was appointed Chief Whip by John Swinney.[4] He ran Swinney's campaign to be re-elected as SNP National Convenor when he was challenged by Dr. Bill Wilson in late 2003. Following the adoption of a new constitution by the SNP in 2004, Crawford was appointed as the SNP's Business Convener.[5]

Government MinisterEdit

At the 2007 Scottish Parliament election, Crawford gained the Stirling seat from the Labour Party.[6] The SNP's combined electoral success put them in minority government, and Crawford was appointed to the junior ministerial position of Minister for Parliamentary Business, a position that he held until the end of the parliamentary session.[7][8]

Crawford was returned to the Stirling constituency in the 2011 election.[9] On 19 May 2011, Crawford became the Cabinet Secretary for Parliamentary Business and Government Strategy,[10] departing from this role on 5 September 2012.[11]

Crawford was Convener of the Referendum (Scotland) Bill Committee 25 October 2012 – 29 October 2014 and then Convener of the Devolution (Further Powers) Committee 29 October 2014 – 23 March 2016.[11]

Return to backbenchesEdit

Crawford was re-elected in the 2016 election.[12] On 18 February 2020, he announced that he would stand down as an MSP at the 2021 election.[13]

Personal lifeEdit

Crawford and his wife, Jacqueline, have three sons.[citation needed]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Beaton, Ailean (18 February 2020). "Bruce Crawford to step down at 2021 Scottish election". Holyrood. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  2. ^ "Vote 99. Scotland constituencies and regions". BBC News. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  3. ^ "Vote 2003. Scotland. Scottish Parliament election. Region. Mid Scotland and Fife". BBC News. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  4. ^ "Swinney reshuffles SNP pack". BBC News. 30 May 2003. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  5. ^ "Cunningham falls in SNP reshuffle". BBC News. 12 September 2004. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  6. ^ "SNP take major seats from Labour". BBC News. 4 May 2007. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  7. ^ "Salmond announces his new cabinet". BBC News. 16 May 2007. Retrieved 19 July 2014.
  8. ^ "Previous MSPs: Session 3 (2007-2011): Bruce Crawford MSP". parliament.scot. The Scottish Parliament. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  9. ^ "Vote 2011. Scottish elections. Constituencies. Stirling". BBC News. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  10. ^ Black, Andrew (20 May 2011). "At-a-glance: Scottish government cabinet". BBC News. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  11. ^ a b "Previous MSPs: Session 4 (2011-2016): Bruce Crawford MSP". parliament.scot. The Scottish Parliament. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  12. ^ "Scotland Election 2016. Stirling. Scottish Parliament constituency". BBC News. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  13. ^ McFarlane, Stuart (18 February 2020). "Stirling MSP to stand down from politics after 33-year career". Daily Record. Retrieved 19 February 2021.

External linksEdit

Scottish Parliament
Preceded by Member of the Scottish Parliament for Stirling
20072021
Succeeded by