British Society for the History of Medicine

The British Society for the History of Medicine (BSHM) is an umbrella organisation of History of medicine societies throughout the United Kingdom, with particular representation to the International Society for the History of Medicine. It has grown from the original four affiliated societies in 1965; the Section for the History of Medicine, The Royal Society of Medicine, London, Osler Club of London, Faculty of the History of Medicine and Pharmacy and the Scottish Society of the History of Medicine, to twenty affiliated societies in 2018.

The British Society for the History of Medicine
British Society for the History of Medicine logo.jpg
BSHM logo
Formation1965
Founder
Founded atRoyal Society of Medicine
FieldsHistory of medicine
1st President
Douglas Guthrie
Present President
Mike Collins
Immediate Past President
Chris Derrett
WebsiteOfficial website

The society holds its congress biennially in centres around the UK, with the eponymous Poynter Lecture, named after librarian and medical historian F. N. L. Poynter, being held on alternate years in London.

PurposeEdit

The chief purpose of the BSHM is "to form an umbrella organisation to ‘promote, organise or sponsor’ history of medicine activities in Britain and to represent British interests to the International Society for the History of Medicine".[1][2]

OriginsEdit

The British Society for the History of Medicine was founded in 1965[3] following the establishment and success of the Faculty of the History of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London,[4] as result of the work of librarian and medical historian F. N. L. Poynter,[5] who along with Douglas Guthrie, also organised the BSHM in its early years.[6][1]

It was established by four original societies - the Section for the History of Medicine, The Royal Society of Medicine, London, the Osler Club of London, the then Faculty of the History of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Society of Apothecaries of London and the Scottish Society of the History of Medicine.[2][7][8]

The founding committee comprised;[2]

In 1966, Medical History became the BSHM's official publication.[9]

Past presidents and the medalEdit

The first president of the BSHM was Douglas Guthrie, an Edinburgh surgeon, whose reputation as a medical historian was enhanced by the publication of his major work A History of Medicine.[1][10] He had been the driving force in establishing the Scottish Society of the History of Medicine[11] in 1948, and he was also elected first president of that society.[10] Zachary Cope and Arthur MacNalty were appointed honorary presidents, Lord Cohen of Birkenhead, W. S. C. Copeman and K. D. Keele as vice-presidents, Poynter as honorary secretary and Edwin Clarke as Poynter's assistant. Charles Newman became treasurer. Poynter also became the national delegate to the International Society for the History of Medicine and Geraint James his deputy.[2]

The logo on the president's medal comprises the logo's of the four founding member societies.[12][13]

Affiliated societiesEdit

The BSHM has a number of affiliated societies whose members also become members of the BSHM.[12] The first two to become affiliated before 1971 were the Society for the Social History of Medicine and the British Society for the History of Pharmacy.[14] Later, others included;[15]

The BSHM works with the British Society for the History of Paediatrics and Child Health.[16]

The Bristol Medico-Historical Society held the 2019 biennial BSHM Congress.[17]

CongressesEdit

The first five congresses were organised by the Faculty of History and Medicine and Pharmacy.[14] The BSHM Congresses have since taken place at centres throughout the UK, in the form of a two- or three-day meeting where keynote lectures are delivered and peer-reviewed papers and posters are presented.[15]

In 1969, the congress was held at Churchill College, Cambridge.[18]

The eighth congress was held in Liverpool in 1971, under the presidency of Lord Cohen of Birkenhead, when Alfred White Franklin was the BSHM's treasurer.[14]

In 1997, the Bristol Medico-Historical Society hosted the seventeenth congress in Bristol University, when Beryl Corner presented her paper "Elizabeth Blackwell 1821-1910: The First Woman on the U.K. Medical Register 1850".[19]

Poynter LecturesEdit

The BSHM congresses had taken place on four occasions between 1965 and 1973. The Poynter Lecture, in memory of Noël Poynter, was created with the aspiration that the Wellcome Trust would hold joint sponsorship.[20][21] In addition to being a past president of the BSHM, he was Director of the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine from 1964 to 1973. He made a number of important contributions to the study of the history of medicine and his influence was felt throughout the world.[22]

John Blair TrustEdit

John Blair is a retired consultant surgeon from Perth Royal Infirmary, who taught at St Andrews and Dundee Universities and became a medical historian. The International Society for the History of Medicine congress, held in Glasgow in 1994 agreed that a Trust Fund could be established in 1995. The John Blair Trust (JBT) was thus established that year by the BSHM and the SSHM. It awards bursaries to undergraduate medical students and allied sciences students, with the objective of promoting "the study of the history of medicine".[23]

Selected publicationsEdit

Congress proceedingsEdit

  • The Evolution of Medical Practice in Britain[24] (1960 conference, London)
  • Chemistry in the Service of Medicine[25] (1961 conference, London)
  • The Evolution of Hospitals in Britain[26] (1962 conference, London)
  • The Evolution of Pharmacy in Britain[27] (1963 conference, Nottingham)
  • The Evolution of Medical Education in Britain[28] (1964 conference, London)
  • Medicine and Science in the 1860s[29][30] (1967 conference, Brighton)
  • Cambridge and its Contribution to Medicine[31] (1969 conference, Cambridge)
  • Wales and Medicine[32] (1973 conference, Swansea/Cardiff)
  • Child Care Through the Centuries[33] (1984 conference, Swansea)
  • The Influence of Scottish Medicine[34] (1986 conference, Edinburgh)
  • A Pox on the Provinces[35] (1988 conference, Bath)
  • Medicine in Northumbria[36] (1993 conference, Newcastle)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Macintyre, Iain (May 2018). "The legacy of Douglas Guthrie (1885-1975), surgeon and medical historian". Journal of Medical Biography. 26 (2): 95–101. doi:10.1177/0967772018755204. ISSN 1758-1087. PMID 29405816.(subscription required)
  2. ^ a b c d "The British Society for the History of Medicine Foundation". Medical History. 9 (4): 390–391. 1965. doi:10.1017/s0025727300031069. PMC 1033538.
  3. ^ Thomas, Adrian, (November 2005) "The Invisible Light". The Journal of The British Society for the History of Radiology. No. 23, p. 4. ISSN 1479-6945
  4. ^ "The British Society for the History of Medicine". Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. XXI (1): 70. 1 January 1966. doi:10.1093/jhmas/XXI.1.70. ISSN 0022-5045. PMC 1033677.(subscription required)
  5. ^ Symons, John. "Poynter, Frederick Noël Lawrence (1908–1979), librarian and medical historian | Oxford Dictionary of National Biography". www.oxforddnb.com. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 14 September 2019.(subscription required)
  6. ^ Keele, Kenneth D. (1 July 1979). "Frederick Noël Lawrence Poynter, B.A., Ph.D., F.L.A., F.R.S.L., Hon. D. Litt. (California), Hon. M.D. (Kiel). 24 December 1908–11 March 1979" (PDF). Medical History. 23 (3): 352–354. doi:10.1017/S0025727300051826. PMC 1082481. PMID 395381 – via Cambridge Core.
  7. ^ Jackson, Mark (2011). The Oxford handbook of the history of medicine (Reprinted. ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 3–4. ISBN 9780199546497.
  8. ^ Porter, Dorothy (1995). "The Mission of Social History of Medicine: An Historical View". Social History of Medicine. 8 (3): 345–359. doi:10.1093/shm/8.3.345. PMID 11609049.
  9. ^ John Symons (1993). A Short History. The Wellcome Trust. pp. 45.
  10. ^ a b Douglas Guthrie. "A History Of Medicine". Thomas Nelson And Sons Ltd London – via Internet Archive.
  11. ^ "The Scottish Society of the History of Medicine - Welcome to the Scottish Society of the History of Medicine".
  12. ^ a b "John Blair Trust – The Scottish Society of the History of Medicine". Scottish Society of the History of Medicine. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  13. ^ "The Thirty Eighth Annual General Meeting". Report of Proceedings Session 1986-87, The Scottish Society of the History of Medicine, p. 1
  14. ^ a b c "British Society for the History of Medicine". Medical History. 15 (3): 307–308. July 1971. doi:10.1017/S0025727300016768. ISSN 0025-7273. PMC 1034180.
  15. ^ a b "BSHM Affiliated Organisations". British Society for the History of Medicine. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  16. ^ "British Society for the History of Paediatrics and Child Health". British Society for the History of Paediatrics and Child Health. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  17. ^ "The Bristol Medico Historical Society".
  18. ^ "British Society for the History of Medicine Seventh British Congress on the History of Medicine". Medical History. 13 (3): 299. July 1969. doi:10.1017/S0025727300014587. ISSN 2048-8343.
  19. ^ Bristol, University of. "2007: Dr Beryl Corner | News | University of Bristol". www.bristol.ac.uk. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  20. ^ Bulletin of the History of Medicine. 57. Johns Hopkins University Press. 1983. pp. 442–443.
  21. ^ "Past Lectures". British Society for the History of Medicine. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  22. ^ Bynum, William F. (1980). "Frederick Noël Lawrence Poynter: Obituary". Swiss Journal of the History of Medicine and Sciences. 37: 145–146.
  23. ^ "Poynter Lecture" (PDF). BSHM Newsletter. June 2016. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  24. ^ Cohen (Lord Cohen of Birkenhead), Henry (January 1962). "The Evolution of Medical Practice in Britain. Edited by F. N. L. Poynter. London: Pitman Medical Publishing Co. Ltd., 1961; pp. vi+ 168. 25s". Medical History. 6 (1): 92–94. doi:10.1017/S002572730002696X. ISSN 2048-8343.
  25. ^ Poynter, F.N.L (ed) (1963). Chemistry in the Service of Medicine. London: Pitman Medical.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  26. ^ Poynter, F.N.L.(ed) (1964). The Evolution of Hospitals in Britain. London: Pitman Medical.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  27. ^ Poynter, F.N.L. (ed) (1965). The Evolution of Pharmacy in Britain. London: Pitman Medical.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  28. ^ Poynter, F.N.L. (ed) (1965). The Evolution of Medical Education in Britain. London: Pitman Medical.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  29. ^ "British Society for the History of Medicine". Medical History. 11 (1): 101. January 1967. doi:10.1017/S0025727300011832. ISSN 0025-7273. PMC 1033677.
  30. ^ Poynter, F.N.L. (ed) (1968). Medicine and Science in the 1860s. London: Wellcome Institute.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  31. ^ Rook, Arthur (ed) (1971). Cambridge and its Contribution to Medicine. London: Wellcome Institute.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  32. ^ Cule, John (ed) (1975). Wales and Medicine. Llandysul: National Library of Wales. ISBN 0850882605.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  33. ^ Cule, John; Turner, Terence (eds) (1986). Child Care Through the Centuries. Cardiff: STS Publishing. ISBN 0-948917-00-8.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  34. ^ Dow, Derek (ed) (1988). The Influence of Scottish Medicine. Carnforth: Parthenon Publishing. ISBN 1-85070-148-2.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  35. ^ Rolls, Roger; Guy, Jean; Guy, John (eds) (1990). A Pox on the Provinces. Bath University Press. ISBN 0-86197-112-4.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  36. ^ Gardner-Medwin, David; Hargreaves, Anne; Lazenby, Elizabeth (1993). Medicine in Northumbria. Newcastle: Pybus Society. ISBN 0-9522097-0-5.

External linksEdit