Brazil national under-23 football team

The Brazil Olympic football team (also known as Brazil under-23, Brazil U23) represents Brazil in international football competitions during Olympic Games and Pan American Games. The selection is limited to players under the age of 23, except three overage players. The team is controlled by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF).

Brazil U23
Brasil Olympic Comittee crest.svg
Nickname(s)Seleção (The National Team), (The Selection)
AssociationConfederação Brasileira de Futebol
(Brazilian Football Confederation)
ConfederationCONMEBOL (South America)
Head coachAndré Jardine
Most capsRonaldinho (27)
Top scorerMatheus Cunha (21)
FIFA codeBRA
First colours
Second colours
First international
 Brazil 5–1 Netherlands 
(Turku, Finland; 16 July 1952)
Biggest win
 Brazil 14–0 Nicaragua 
(Mexico City, Mexico; 17 October 1975)
Biggest defeat
 Colombia 5–1 Brazil 
(Cali, Colombia; 10 February 1980)
Olympic Games
Appearances14 (first in 1952)
Best resultGold medal.svg Gold medalist (2016, 2020)
Pan American Games
Appearances11 (first in 1959)
Best resultGold medal america.svg Gold medalist (1963, 1975, 1979, 1987)

The Olympic football tournament was the last international competition in football organized by FIFA which Brazil had never won until they won at home in 2016. They had previously won three silver medals (1984, 1988, 2012) and two bronze medals (1996, 2008).[1] The team was often coached by the in-charge senior team coach in the past, such as Mário Zagallo in 1996, Vanderlei Luxemburgo in 2000, Dunga in 2008 and Mano Menezes in 2012.

HistoryEdit

1952–1976 Summer OlympicsEdit

Brazil's first participation in the Olympics was in Helsinki, Finland, in 1952. In that year, Brazil reached the quarter-finals, when they were eliminated by West Germany 4–2.[2] In 1960, in Rome, Italy,[3] in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan,[4] in 1968 in Mexico City, Mexico,[5] and in 1972 in Berlin, West Germany,[6] Brazil was eliminated in the first stage. In Montreal, 1976, Brazil was defeated by Poland 2–0 in the semi-finals, then Brazil was defeated by the Soviet Union 2–0 in the bronze medal match, finishing in the fourth place.[7] In these six participations, Brazil was represented by a team of junior or non-professional players as the Olympics did not allow professional players to participate during this period, all while state-sponsored communist players were allowed to compete.

1984 Summer Olympics – Los AngelesEdit

Starting in 1984, professional players were allowed to participate. However, European and South American teams, as traditional football powerhouses that won every single FIFA World Cup, were restricted to players with no more than five "A" caps at the start of the tournament. Brazil won its first medal in 1984, in Los Angeles, United States. In the group stage, Brazil beat Saudi Arabia 3–1, West Germany 1–0 and Morocco 2–0. In the quarter-finals Brazil defeated Canada in the penalty shootout, then they beat Italy 2–1 after extra-time in the semi-finals, but was beaten by France 2–0 in the gold medal Match, thus winning the silver medal.[8]

1988 Summer Olympics – SeoulEdit

The second Brazilian silver medal was won in Seoul, South Korea, in 1988. Brazil won the medal after defeating in the group stage Nigeria 4–0, Australia 3–0 and Yugoslavia 2–1. In the quarter-finals Brazil beat their South American rivals Argentina 1–0, then defeated West Germany in the penalty shootout, but was defeated by the Soviet Union 2–1 after extra time in the gold medal match.[9] Romário was the competition's top goal scorer with seven goals.[10]

1996 Summer Olympics – AtlantaEdit

Starting in 1992, only players under the age of 23 were allowed to participate, with an exception of three overage players in the team. Brazil, managed by senior team coach, Mário Zagallo, won the bronze medal for the first time in 1996, in Atlanta, United States. In the group stage, Brazil was beaten by Japan 1–0 in the first match, then they beat Hungary 3–1 and Nigeria 1–0, finishing in the group's first position. After beating Ghana 4–2 in the quarter-finals, Brazil was defeated by Nigeria 4–3 after extra time. In the bronze medal match, Brazil beat Portugal 5–0.[11]

2000 Summer Olympics – SydneyEdit

Brazil, managed by senior team coach, Vanderlei Luxemburgo, was eliminated in the quarter-finals. In the group stage, Brazil beat by Slovakia 3–1 in the first match, then they were beaten by South Africa 3–1. In the last group match, Brazil beat Japan 1–0 to secure the first position in the group stage. In the quarter-finals, Brazil was beaten by Cameroon 1–2, who later won the gold medal.[12]

2003 CONCACAF Gold CupEdit

In December 2002, CBF appointed Ricardo Gomes as the coach for the Brazil Olympic team who were preparing for the 2004 Olympics. Prior to Olympic qualifying, the Brazil Olympic team or Brazil U23 was sent to compete at the 2003 CONCACAF Gold Cup. Brazil was invited to the tournament and decided to send their Under-23 team, due to their senior team competing a month earlier at the 2003 FIFA Confederations Cup. Although Brazil competed with an U23 team, all the appearances and goals in this tournament were recognized by FIFA as full international caps.[13] The Brazil U23 team advanced all the way to the final, but were defeated by Mexico 0–1 after extra time, denying Brazil the chance to be the first guest team to win the tournament. The following year Brazil failed to qualify for the 2004 Olympic Games after losing out to Paraguay and Argentina in the qualifying tournament.[14]

2008 Summer Olympics – BeijingEdit

Brazil, managed by senior team coach, Dunga, finished in the first position in the group stage, ahead of Belgium, New Zealand and China, which they beat 1–0, 5–0 and 3–0 respectively.[15] In the second round, Brazil beat Cameroon 2–0 after extra time.[16] Brazil and Argentina met on August 19 in the semi-final game of the competition. The game was marred by numerous fouls and two ejections for Brazil. Argentina won 3–0.[17] In the bronze medal match, Brazil beat Belgium 3–0.[18]

2012 Summer Olympics – LondonEdit

Brazil, under coach Mano Menezes, was defeated by Mexico 2–1 in the gold medal match, played on 11 August,[19] after beating Egypt, Belarus and New Zealand in the preliminary round, Honduras in the quarter-finals and South Korea in the semi-finals. Before the Games, they beat Great Britain 2–0 in a friendly game.

2016 Summer Olympics – Rio de JaneiroEdit

 
Brazil vs Honduras during the men's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Brazil finished in the first position in the group stage, ahead of Denmark (won 4–0), Iraq (tied 0–0) and South Africa (tied 0–0), with the two latter games were a slumpy start for Brazil. In the second round, Brazil beat Colombia 2–0 and in the semi-final match, Brazil played a one-sided game against Honduras and won 6–0. In the final against Germany, on 20 August 2016 – the first match between the two teams in any FIFA-sanctioned tournament since the historic 2014 FIFA World Cup semi-final – Brazil edged a 5–4 victory on penalties after a 1–1 draw. Neymar, captaining the side, scored the decisive penalty to win the tournament for the first time ever.[20]

2020 Summer Olympics – TokyoEdit

Brazil qualified for the 2020 Summer Olympics as the runners-up of the 2020 CONMEBOL Pre-Olympic Tournament. The team finished at the top of their group with 7 points, following a 4–2 win over Germany, a 0–0 draw to Ivory Coast and a 3–1 win over Saudi Arabia. They beat Egypt 1–0 in the quarter-finals, and Mexico in the semi-finals with a 4–1 victory in the penalty shootouts following a 0–0 draw in extra time. In the final against Spain, Matheus Cunha opened the score for Brazil in the first half and a Mikel Oyarzabal goal in the second half forced the match into extra time; Malcom scored the winning goal in the 108th minute, which lead Brazil to their second Olympic gold medal, consecutively after their first win in Rio five years prior.[21][22]

Results and fixturesEdit

  Win   Draw   Loss

2020Edit

19 January 2020 2020 Pre-Olympic Tournament Brazil   1–0   Peru Armenia, Colombia
20:30 COT (UTC−5) Paulinho   43' Report Stadium: Estadio Centenario
Referee: Ángel Arteaga (Venezuela)
22 January 2020 2020 Pre-Olympic Tournament Brazil   3–1   Uruguay Estadio Hernán Ramírez Villegas, Pereira
20:30
Report
Referee: Facundo Tello (Argentina)
28 January 2020 2020 Pre-Olympic Tournament Brazil   5–3   Bolivia Armenia, Colombia
20:30 COT
Report
Stadium: Estadio Centenario
Referee: Facundo Tello (Argentina)
31 January 2020 2020 Pre-Olympic Tournament Brazil   2–1   Paraguay Armenia, Colombia
20:30 COT
Report
Stadium: Estadio Centenario
Referee: Piero Maza (Chile)
3 February 2020 (2020-02-03) 2020 Pre-Olympic Tournament Brazil   1–1   Colombia Estadio Alfonso López, Bucaramanga
20:30
Report
Referee: Ángel Arteaga (Venezuela)
6 February 2020 (2020-02-06) 2020 Pre-Olympic Tournament Brazil   1–1   Uruguay Estadio Alfonso López, Bucaramanga
18:00
Report
Referee: Eber Aquino (Paraguay)
9 February 2020 (2020-02-09) 2020 Pre-Olympic Tournament Argentina   0–3   Brazil Estadio Alfonso López, Bucaramanga
20:30 Report
Referee: Alexis Herrera (Venezuela)
14 November 2020 (2020-11-14) Friendly Brazil   3–1   South Korea Cairo, Egypt
14:00 (UTC+2)
Report Stadium: Al Salam Stadium
Attendance: 0
17 November 2020 (2020-11-17) Friendly Egypt   2–1   Brazil Cairo, Egypt
20:00 (UTC+2)
Report
Stadium: Cairo International Stadium
Attendance: 0

2021Edit

5 June 2021 (2021-06-05) Friendly Brazil   1–2   Cape Verde Belgrade, Serbia
21:00 UTC+2 Pedro   38' (pen.) Report L. Semedo   45'
W. Semedo   83'
Stadium: Partizan Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Novak Simović (Serbia)
8 June 2021 (2021-06-08) Friendly Serbia   0–3   Brazil Belgrade, Serbia
21:00 UTC+2 Report Arana   34'
Pedro   75'77'
Stadium: Partizan Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Miloš Ðordic (Serbia)
15 July 2021 (2021-07-15) Friendly Brazil   5–2   United Arab Emirates Novi Sad, Serbia
21:00 UTC+2 Diego Carlos   43'
Reinier   78'
Martinelli   82'
Cunha   84'90+1'
Report Nino   21' (o.g.)
Al-Naqbi   67'
Stadium: Karađorđe Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Marko Ivković (Serbia)
22 July 2021 2020 Olympics GS Group D Brazil   4–2   Germany Yokohama, Japan
17:30 UTC+9 Richarlison   7'22'30'
Paulinho   90+5'
Report Amiri   57'
Ache   84'
Stadium: International Stadium Yokohama
Attendance: 0
Referee: Iván Barton (El Salvador)
28 July 2021 2020 Olympics GS Group D Saudi Arabia   1–3   Brazil Saitama, Japan
17:00 UTC+9 Al-Amri   27' Report Cunha   14'
Richarlison   76'90+3'
Stadium: Saitama Stadium 2002
Attendance: 0
Referee: Bamlak Tessema (Ethiopia)
31 July 2021 2020 Olympics Quarter-finals Brazil   1–0   Egypt Saitama, Japan
19:00 UTC+9 Cunha   37' Report Stadium: Saitama Stadium 2002
Attendance: 0
Referee: Chris Beath (Australia)
3 August 2021 2020 Olympics Semi-finals Mexico   0–0 (a.e.t.)
(1–4 p)
  Brazil Kashima, Japan
17:00 UTC+9 Report Stadium: Kashima Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Georgi Kabakov (Bulgaria)
Penalties
7 August 2021 2020 Summer Olympics Final Brazil   2–1 (a.e.t.)   Spain Yokohama, Japan
20:30 UTC+9
Report
Stadium: International Stadium Yokohama
Referee: Chris Beath (Australia)

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following 22 players were called up for the 2020 Summer Olympics and a preceding friendly match against the United Arab Emirates on 15 July 2021.[23][24][25][26]

  • Caps and goals correct as of 7 August 2021, after the match against Spain.
No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Santos* (1990-03-17) 17 March 1990 (age 31) 7 0   Athletico Paranaense
12 1GK Brenno (1999-04-01) 1 April 1999 (age 22) 1 0   Grêmio
22 1GK Lucão (2001-02-26) 26 February 2001 (age 20) 1 0   Vasco da Gama

2 2DF Gabriel Menino (2000-09-29) 29 September 2000 (age 20) 5 0   Palmeiras
3 2DF Diego Carlos* (1993-03-15) 15 March 1993 (age 28) 7 1   Sevilla
4 2DF Ricardo Graça (1997-02-16) 16 February 1997 (age 24) 3 0   Vasco da Gama
6 2DF Guilherme Arana (1997-04-14) 14 April 1997 (age 24) 11 1   Atlético Mineiro
13 2DF Dani Alves* (captain) (1983-05-06) 6 May 1983 (age 38) 7 0   São Paulo
14 2DF Bruno Fuchs (1999-04-01) 1 April 1999 (age 22) 8 0   CSKA Moscow
15 2DF Nino (1997-04-10) 10 April 1997 (age 24) 14 0   Fluminense
16 2DF Abner (2000-05-27) 27 May 2000 (age 21) 3 0   Athletico Paranaense

5 3MF Douglas Luiz (1998-05-09) 9 May 1998 (age 23) 13 2   Aston Villa
8 3MF Bruno Guimarães (1997-11-16) 16 November 1997 (age 23) 18 0   Lyon
18 3MF Matheus Henrique (1997-12-19) 19 December 1997 (age 23) 19 1   Grêmio
19 3MF Reinier (2002-01-19) 19 January 2002 (age 19) 16 3   Borussia Dortmund
20 3MF Claudinho (1997-01-28) 28 January 1997 (age 24) 9 0   Red Bull Bragantino

7 4FW Paulinho (2000-07-15) 15 July 2000 (age 21) 24 7   Bayer Leverkusen
9 4FW Matheus Cunha (1999-05-27) 27 May 1999 (age 22) 24 21   Hertha BSC
10 4FW Richarlison (1997-05-10) 10 May 1997 (age 24) 6 5   Everton
11 4FW Antony (2000-02-24) 24 February 2000 (age 21) 23 6   Ajax
17 4FW Malcom (1997-02-26) 26 February 1997 (age 24) 9 1   Zenit Saint Petersburg
21 4FW Gabriel Martinelli (2001-06-18) 18 June 2001 (age 20) 8 1   Arsenal

Overage Players are marked with asterisk (*).

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up to a Brazil under-23 squad in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Cleiton (1997-08-19) 19 August 1997 (age 24) 5 0   Red Bull Bragantino v. Serbia U24, 8 June 2021
GK Gabriel Brazão (2000-10-05) 5 October 2000 (age 20) 0 0   Oviedo v. Serbia U24, 8 June 2021
GK Phelipe Megiolaro (1999-02-08) 8 February 1999 (age 22) 3 0   Dallas v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
GK Daniel Fuzato (1997-07-04) 4 July 1997 (age 24) 1 0   Gil Vicente v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020

DF Gabriel (1997-12-19) 19 December 1997 (age 23) 4 0   Arsenal 2020 Summer Olympics INJ
DF Guga (1998-08-29) 29 August 1998 (age 23) 15 1   Atlético Mineiro v. Serbia U24, 8 June 2021
DF Luiz Felipe (1997-03-22) 22 March 1997 (age 24) 2 0   Lazio v. Serbia U24, 8 June 2021
DF Vitão (2000-02-02) 2 February 2000 (age 21) 0 0   Shakhtar Donetsk v. Serbia U24, 8 June 2021
DF Emerson (1999-01-14) 14 January 1999 (age 22) 10 0   Barcelona v. Cape Verde, 5 June 2021 WIT
DF Ibañez (1998-11-23) 23 November 1998 (age 22) 6 0   Roma v. Cape Verde, 5 June 2021 INJ
DF Caio Henrique (1997-07-31) 31 July 1997 (age 24) 11 0   Monaco v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
DF Lyanco (1997-02-01) 1 February 1997 (age 24) 11 0   Torino v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
DF Dodô (1998-11-17) 17 November 1998 (age 22) 5 0   Shakhtar Donetsk v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
DF Murilo (1997-03-27) 27 March 1997 (age 24) 5 0   Lokomotiv Moscow v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
DF Ayrton Lucas (1997-06-19) 19 June 1997 (age 24) 1 0   Spartak Moscow v. South Korea U23, 14 November 2020 WIT

MF Douglas Augusto (1997-01-13) 13 January 1997 (age 24) 1 0   PAOK 2020 Summer Olympics INJ
MF Gerson (1997-05-20) 20 May 1997 (age 24) 2 0   Marseille 2020 Summer Olympics WIT
MF Liziero (1998-02-07) 7 February 1998 (age 23) 1 0   São Paulo v. Serbia U24, 8 June 2021
MF Wendel (1997-08-28) 28 August 1997 (age 24) 12 1   Zenit Saint Petersburg v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
MF Maycon (1997-07-15) 15 July 1997 (age 24) 5 0   Shakhtar Donetsk v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
MF Mauro Júnior (1999-05-06) 6 May 1999 (age 22) 4 0   PSV v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
MF Gustavo Assunção (2000-03-20) 20 March 2000 (age 21) 2 0   Famalicão v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
MF Marcos Antônio (2000-06-13) 13 June 2000 (age 21) 2 0   Shakhtar Donetsk v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
MF Tetê (2000-02-15) 15 February 2000 (age 21) 2 0   Shakhtar Donetsk v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
MF Lucas Paquetá (1997-08-27) 27 August 1997 (age 24) 0 0   Lyon v. South Korea U23, 14 November 2020 WIT

FW Pedro (1997-06-20) 20 June 1997 (age 24) 10 5   Flamengo 2020 Summer Olympics WIT
FW Rodrygo (2001-01-09) 9 January 2001 (age 20) 6 1   Real Madrid v. Serbia U24, 8 June 2021
FW Evanilson (1999-10-06) 6 October 1999 (age 21) 3 0   Porto v. Serbia U24, 8 June 2021
FW David Neres (1997-03-03) 3 March 1997 (age 24) 2 0   Ajax v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
FW Danilo (1999-04-07) 7 April 1999 (age 22) 1 0   Twente v. Egypt U23, 17 November 2020
FW Pedrinho (1998-04-13) 13 April 1998 (age 23) 15 3   Shakhtar Donetsk v. South Korea U23, 14 November 2020 INJ

  • INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
  • WIT Player withdrew from the squad due to non-injury related reasons.
  • CAN The call-ups were withdrawn due to the matches being cancelled.

Competitive recordEdit

HonoursEdit

  • Wuhan Youth Soccer Tournament
    • Winners: 2014
  • Copa Mercosur
    • Winners: 1995

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Since 1992, squads for Football at the Summer Olympics have been restricted to three players over the age of 23. The achievements of such teams are not usually included in the statistics of the international team.
  2. ^ "Games of the XV. Olympiad". RSSSF. 25 October 1999. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  3. ^ "Games of the XVII. Olympiad". RSSSF. 26 October 1999. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  4. ^ "Games of the XVIII. Olympiad". RSSSF. 3 November 1999. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  5. ^ "Games of the XIX. Olympiad". RSSSF. 3 November 1999. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  6. ^ "XX. Olympiad Munich 1972 Football Tournament". RSSSF. 13 November 1999. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  7. ^ "Montreal 1976 – Fixtures and Results". FIFA.com. Archived from the original on August 17, 2012. Retrieved September 5, 2008.
  8. ^ "Los Angeles 1984 – Fixtures and Results". FIFA.com. Archived from the original on September 14, 2008. Retrieved September 5, 2008.
  9. ^ "Seoul 1988 – Fixtures and Results". FIFA.com. Archived from the original on September 17, 2008. Retrieved September 5, 2008.
  10. ^ "XXIV. Olympiad Seoul 1988 Football Tournament". RSSSF. 15 November 1999. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  11. ^ "XXV. Olympiad Atlanta 1996 Mens Football Tournament". RSSSF. 21 November 1999. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  12. ^ "XXVII. Olympiad Sydney 2000 Mens Football Tournament". RSSSF. 22 August 2008. Retrieved 22 May 2009.
  13. ^ "Seleção Brasileira (Brazilian National Team) 2002–2003". RSSSF. 11 October 2008. Retrieved 22 May 2009.
  14. ^ "Seleção Brasileira Restritiva (Brazilian National Restrictive Team) 2000–2003". RSSSF. 16 September 2008. Retrieved 22 May 2009.
  15. ^ "Resultados" (in Portuguese). Terra. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  16. ^ "Brazil – Cameroon Score". Yahoo Eurosport. Archived from the original on August 21, 2008. Retrieved September 5, 2008.
  17. ^ "Argentina goleia Brasil e defronta Nigéria na final" (in Portuguese). TSF. August 19, 2008. Archived from the original on July 23, 2009. Retrieved September 5, 2008.
  18. ^ "Brazil downs Belgium for men's soccer bronze". CBC. 22 August 2008. Archived from the original on 23 July 2009. Retrieved 5 September 2008.
  19. ^ Irvin, Duncan (11 August 2012). "Mexico Wins Soccer Gold Medal, 2–1". New York Times. Retrieved 11 August 2012.
  20. ^ "Brazil find redemption, make history at the Maracana". Retrieved 21 August 2016.
  21. ^ "Brazil 2 Spain 1". BBC Sport. 7 August 2021. Retrieved 9 August 2021.
  22. ^ "Brazil edge Spain in men's Olympic football final thanks to Malcom's magic". Guardian. 7 August 2021. Retrieved 9 August 2021.
  23. ^ "Seleção Olímpica é convocada para os Jogos Olímpicos de Tóquio 2020". CBF. 17 June 2021. Retrieved 17 June 2021.
  24. ^ "Com mudanças, Jardine anuncia os 22 convocados para defender o Brasil nas Olimpíadas de Tóquio". Globo Esporte. 2 July 2021. Retrieved 2 July 2021.
  25. ^ "Richarlison ganha a 10 e Daniel Alves a 13; veja a numeração da Seleção para os Jogos de Tóquio". Globo Esporte. 7 July 2021. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  26. ^ "Malcom é chamado para lugar de Douglas Augusto na Seleção Olímpica". CBF. 14 July 2021. Retrieved 14 July 2021.