Brandval is a former municipality in the old Hedmark county, Norway. The 587-square-kilometre (227 sq mi) municipality[3] existed from 1867 until its dissolution in 1964 when it became part of Kongsvinger Municipality. It was located in the southern part of the traditional district of Solør. The administrative centre of the old municipality was the village of Brandval where Brandval Church is located. The municipality included the populated Glomma river valley in the west and the more sparsely populated Finnskogen forest area in the east.[4]

Brandval herred
View of the local Brandval Church
View of the local Brandval Church
Official logo of Brandval herred
Brandval within Hedmark
Brandval within Hedmark
Coordinates: 60°19′N 12°02′E / 60.317°N 12.033°E / 60.317; 12.033Coordinates: 60°19′N 12°02′E / 60.317°N 12.033°E / 60.317; 12.033
CountryNorway
CountyHedmark
DistrictSolør
Established1 Jan 1867
 • Preceded byGrue Municipality
Disestablished1 Jan 1964
 • Succeeded byKongsvinger Municipality
Administrative centreBrandval
Area
 (upon dissolution)
 • Total587 km2 (227 sq mi)
Population
 (1964)
 • Total4,384
 • Density7.5/km2 (19/sq mi)
DemonymBrandvalsokning[1]
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-0422

NameEdit

The municipality (originally the parish) is named after the old Brandval farm (Old Norse: Brandváll), since the first Brandval Church was built there. The first element is brandr which means "fire" or "burning" and the last element is váll which means "clearing made by the use of fire". Thus the name likely refers to a forested area that was cleared by burning.[5]

HistoryEdit

Historically, Brandval was part of the large parish of Grue. On 1 January 1838, when municipalities were established in Norway, Brandval was part of Grue Municipality, making up the southern part of the municipality. On 1 January 1867, the Brandval area (population: 3,946) was separated from Grue to become the new Brandval municipality. This left Grue with 6,464 residents. In 1941 a small part of Grue municipality (population: 68) was transferred to Brandval municipality. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1964, the municipality of Brandval (population: 4,384) was merged with the town of Kongsvinger (population: 2,349) and the municipality of Vinger (population: 6,257) to form the new Kongsvinger Municipality which had a total population of 12,990 residents.[6]

GovernmentEdit

The municipality was governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elected a mayor.[7]

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Herredsstyre) of Brandval was made up of representatives that were elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the final municipal council was as follows:

Brandval herredsstyre 1960–1963 [8]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
Total number of members:21
Brandval herredsstyre 1956–1959 [9]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:21
Brandval herredsstyre 1952–1955 [10]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)2
Total number of members:16
Brandval herredsstyre 1948–1951 [11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)2
Total number of members:16
Brandval herredsstyre 1945–1947 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)
1
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)1
Total number of members:16
Brandval herredsstyre 1938–1941* [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)1
Total number of members:16
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

MayorsEdit

The mayors of Brandval:[14]

  • 1868-1870: Lars Bredesen Breen
  • 1871-1886: Per Hansen Gjølstad
  • 1887-1889: Kolbjørn Olsen
  • 1890-1897: Per Hansen Gjølstad
  • 1898-1901: Martin Hansen
  • 1902-1910: Arne Næss
  • 1911-1913: Rangvald Jahr
  • 1914-1919: Nils Aas
  • 1920-1931: Ole Ruud
  • 1932-1934: Kasper Dalermoen
  • 1935-1936: Arnt Nylund
  • 1937-1937: Thor Hals
  • 1938-1940: Gustav Storhæsen
  • 1941-1945: Ole Sandbæk
  • 1945-1947: Anton Braaten
  • 1948-1963: John Ruud

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ Helland, Amund (1902). "Brandval herred". Norges land og folk: Kristians amt (in Norwegian). Vol. IV. Kristiania, Norway: H. Aschehoug & Company. p. 311. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  4. ^ Mæhlum, Lars, ed. (5 February 2022). "Brandval". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  5. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Hedmarkens amt (in Norwegian) (3 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. pp. 235 and 240.
  6. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  7. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (26 July 2019). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  8. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960.
  9. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957.
  10. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952.
  11. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948.
  12. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947.
  13. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938.
  14. ^ "Ordførere i Brandval kommune fra 1868 til 1963" (in Norwegian). Kongsvinger kommune. Retrieved 18 March 2022.