Bow Valley (provincial electoral district)

Bow Valley was a provincial electoral district in Alberta, Canada, mandated to return a single member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1913 to 1940, and again from 1971 to 1997.[1]

Bow Valley
Alberta electoral district
Defunct provincial electoral district
LegislatureLegislative Assembly of Alberta
District created1913
District abolished1940
District re-created1971
District re-abolished1997
First contested1913
Last contested1993

HistoryEdit

Members of the Legislative Assembly for Bow Valley
Assembly Years Member Party
See Gleichen electoral district from 1905-1913
and Lethbridge District from 1909-1913
3rd  1913–1913     George Lane Liberal
 1913–1917 Charles Richmond Mitchell
4th  1917–1921
5th  1921–1926
6th  1926–1930 Joseph Tweed Shaw
7th  1930–1935     John Mackintosh Independent
8th  1935–1940     Wilson E. Cain Social Credit
See Edson electoral district from 1940-1971
and Bow Valley-Empress electoral district from 1940-1971
17th  1971–1975     Fred Mandeville Social Credit
18th  1975–1979
19th  1979–1982
20th  1982–1986     Tom Musgrove Progressive Conservative
21st  1986–1989
22nd  1989–1993
23rd  1993–1997 Lyle Oberg
See Strathmore-Brooks electoral district from 1996-2019,
Drumheller-Chinook electoral district from 1996-2004
and Cypress-Medicine Hat electoral district from 1996-Present

The Bow Valley electoral district was formed in 1913 from the Gleichen and Lethbridge District electoral districts. Bow Valley would be abolished prior to the 1940 Alberta general election, primarily forming Bow Valley-Empress electoral district, and a small portion added to Edson electoral district.

Bow Valley was revived in the 1970 electoral district re-distribution from the Bow Valley-Empress electoral district.

In the 1996 electoral district re-distribution, the Bow Valley electoral district was abolished and the territory was divided among Strathmore-Brooks, Drumheller-Chinook and Cypress-Medicine Hat electoral districts. The Electoral Boundaries Commission drafted the report with the intention of the Strathmore-Brooks electoral district retaining the name "Bow Valley".[2]

Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs)Edit

The 1926 Alberta general election would be the first held under single transferable vote in rural districts. Liberal leader Joseph Tweed Shaw would come second in the first count to United Farmers of Alberta candidate Ben S. Plumer.[3] However, on the count of transferable votes Shaw would win the district by one vote.[4]

Election resultsEdit

1913 general electionEdit

1913 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal George Lane 396 61.78%
Conservative Harold William Hounsfield Riley 245 38.22%
Total 641
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout 1,081 59.30%
Liberal pickup new district.
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1913 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1913 by-electionEdit

Alberta provincial by-election, June 12, 1913
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal Charles Richmond Mitchell Acclaimed
Called due to resignation of G. Lane to provide seat
Source: "By-elections for the Period of 1905 – 1973". Elections Alberta. Retrieved 2015-06-30.

1917 general electionEdit

1917 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Charles Richmond Mitchell 604 58.13% -3.65%
Conservative Edmund F. Purcell 435 41.87% 3.65%
Total 1,039
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout 1,466 70.87% 11.58%
Liberal hold Swing -3.65%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1917 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1921 general electionEdit

1921 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Charles Richmond Mitchell 1,694 72.30% 14.17%
United Farmers George A. Love 649 27.70%
Total 2,343
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout 2,669 N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing 14.17%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1921 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1926 general electionEdit

1926 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
±%
Liberal Joseph Tweed Shaw 847 35.94% 1,048 -36.36%
United Farmers Ben S. Plumer 869 36.87% 1,047 9.17%
Conservative Edmund F. Purcell 641 27.20%
Total 2,357
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 188
Eligible electors / Turnout 3,750 67.87%
Liberal hold Swing -22.77%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1926 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Instant-runoff voting requires a candidate to receive a plurality (greater than 50%) of the votes.
As no candidate received a plurality of votes, the bottom candidate was eliminated and their 2nd place votes were applied to both other candidates until one received a plurality.

1930 general electionEdit

1930 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Independent John Mackintosh 1,253 56.65%
United Farmers L.P. Schooling 959 43.35% 6.49%
Total 2,212
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 189
Eligible electors / Turnout 2,936 81.78% 13.91%
Independent gain from Liberal Swing 7.11%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1930 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1935 general electionEdit

1935 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Wilson E. Cain 1,776 59.76%
Liberal David Nelson 591 19.89%
United Farmers J. M. Wheatley 401 13.49% -29.86%
Independent John Mackintosh 204 6.86% -49.78%
Total 2,972
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 127
Eligible electors / Turnout 3,606 85.94% 4.16%
Social Credit gain from Independent Swing 13.29%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1935 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1971 general electionEdit

1971 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Fred Mandeville 3,584 68.16%
Progressive Conservative Don Murray 1,674 31.84%
Total 5,258
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 39
Eligible electors / Turnout 6,877 77.02%
Social Credit pickup new district.
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1971 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1975 general electionEdit

1975 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Fred Mandeville 2,992 58.89% -9.28%
Progressive Conservative Jim C. George 1,906 37.51% 5.68%
New Democratic Syd Evans 183 3.60%
Total 5,081
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 14
Eligible electors / Turnout 7,981 63.84% -13.18%
Social Credit hold Swing -7.48%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1975 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1979 general electionEdit

1979 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Fred Mandeville 4,123 59.81% 0.92%
Progressive Conservative Paul Bartlett 2,484 36.03% -1.48%
New Democratic Ron Wickson 201 2.92% -0.69%
Liberal Brian Nearing 86 1.25%
Total 6,894
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 21
Eligible electors / Turnout 10,076 68.63% 4.79%
Social Credit hold Swing 1.20%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1979 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1982 general electionEdit

1982 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Tom N. Musgrove 4,541 60.34% 24.31%
Independent Murray Erickson 2,719 36.13%
New Democratic Bradley Neubauer 266 3.53% 0.62%
Total 7,526
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 35
Eligible electors / Turnout 10,985 68.83% 0.20%
Progressive Conservative gain from Social Credit Swing 0.22%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1982 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1986 general electionEdit

1986 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Tom N. Musgrove 3,395 57.88% -2.46%
Representative Martha Andrews 1,220 20.80%
Liberal Bud Olson 1,046 17.83%
New Democratic Vanore Voaklander 205 3.49% -0.04%
Total 5,866
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 6
Eligible electors / Turnout 12,287 47.79% -21.04%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing 6.43%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1986 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1989 general electionEdit

1989 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Tom N. Musgrove 3,405 60.46% 2.58%
Liberal George Timko 1,561 27.72% 9.89%
New Democratic Larry D. Kern 666 11.83% 8.33%
Total 5,632
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 12
Eligible electors / Turnout 11,486 49.14% 1.35%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -2.17%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1989 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1993 general electionEdit

1993 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Lyle Oberg 5,403 61.25% 0.79%
Liberal Peter Hansen 2,424 27.48% -0.24%
New Democratic Richard Knutson 558 6.33% -5.50%
Social Credit Reuben Huber 436 4.94%
Total 8,821
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 17
Eligible electors / Turnout 14,327 61.69% 12.55%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing 0.52%
Source(s)
Source: "Bow Valley Official Results 1993 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Election results for Bow Valley". abheritage.ca. Wayback Machine: Heritage Community Foundation. Archived from the original on December 8, 2010. Retrieved 8 June 2020.
  2. ^ Alberta Electoral Boundaries Commission (June 1996). "Proposed Electoral Division Areas, Boundaries, and Names for Alberta. Final Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta". Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Retrieved May 29, 2020.
  3. ^ Mackenzie, John (June 3, 1926). "As Seen From the Press Gallery". The U.F.A. United Farmers of Alberta. 5 (15): 8. Retrieved 17 June 2020.
  4. ^ "Bow Valley Official Results 1926 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit