Boavista F.C.

  (Redirected from Boavista Futebol Clube)

Boavista Futebol Clube, commonly known as Boavista (Portuguese pronunciation: [boɐˈviʃtɐ]) is a Portuguese sports club from the city of Porto. Founded on 1 August 1903 by British entrepreneurs and Portuguese textile workers[1] (thus the "FC" being appended – the British way as opposed to the more common Portuguese way of being prepended to the club's name), it is one of the oldest clubs in the country and plays in the Primeira Liga, Portuguese football's top flight.

Boavista
Boavista F.C. logo.svg
Full nameBoavista Futebol Clube
Nickname(s)Os Axadrezados
(The Chequered ones)
As Panteras
(The Panthers)
Founded1 August 1903; 117 years ago (1 August 1903)
GroundEstádio do Bessa
Capacity28,263
PresidentVítor Murta
Head coachJesualdo Ferreira
LeaguePrimeira Liga
2019–20Primeira Liga, 12th of 18
WebsiteClub website
Current season

Boavista grew to become an important sports club in Portugal, with sections dedicated to several sports including football, chess, gymnastics, bicycle racing, futsal, volleyball, rink hockey and boxing, among others, with the most notable being the football section with their trademark chequered white and black shirts. The club is the most eclectic one in the North region of Portugal, and one of the most eclectic sports clubs in Portugal, practicing a total of 16 sports.[citation needed]

With 9 major domestic trophies won (1 Championship, 5 Portuguese Cups and 3 domestic Super Cups), Boavista is the most decorated Portuguese football club after the "Big Three" (Benfica, Porto and Sporting CP). Boavista spent 39 consecutive seasons in the Primeira Liga (50 in total) and, together with Belenenses, is the only team outside the "Big Three" to have won the Portuguese Championship, in the 2000–01 season. Boavista has a rivalry with fellow city club Porto;[2] the matches between the clubs are sometimes called O Derby da Invicta.

Its stadium, Estádio do Bessa, was built in 1973, although football has been played there at the former 'Campo do Bessa' since the 1910s, and was revamped for use in Euro 2004.

HistoryEdit

Foundation and the chequered shirts (1903–1933)Edit

 
Boavista in June 1923, in their previous all-black shirts.

The club was founded on 1 August 1903, in the Boavista area of the western part of the city of Porto, by two English brothers, Harry and Dick Lowe.[3] Having received an imported football from their father in England, they founded The Boavista Footballers, and an early rival was another English club in the city, the Oporto Cricket and Lawn Tennis Club.[4] The team had an early schism as its British contingent refused to play on Sundays due to their Anglican faith, while the Catholic locals could only play on Sundays due to work commitments; the locals won, drastically changing the demographics of the club.[4] In 1910 the current name was adopted, and on 11 April that year the ground now occupied by the Estádio do Bessa was inaugurated with a match against Leixões SC.[3] In 1913–14, the team won the inaugural Porto Football Association.[3]

In the 1920s the club increased the number of sports practiced.[4] The team boasted "the best defensive trio of the North": goalkeeper Casoto and defenders Lúzia and Óscar Vasques de Carvalho.[4] In the following decade, the club lobbied for the legalisation of professionalism after being sanctioned, having been investigated after complaining that FC Porto had paid Boavista's Nova to join them.[4] In 1933, the club adopted its black-and-white shirts, based on a French team that club president Artur Oliveira Valença had watched.[4]

League entry and golden 1970s (1934–1980)Edit

Boavista's first decades in league football saw the club bounce between the Primeira and the Segunda Divisão, winning the latter's title in 1937 and 1950. In 1966, they fell to the Terceira Divisão, and stayed there for two years.[5]

The team bounced back to the top flight by 1970 with two consecutive promotions, finished renovation of its stadium two years later and in 1974 hired manager José Maria Pedroto and president Valentim Loureiro. In their first year, Boavista achieved their best classification of fourth in the 1974-1975 championship, and won the Taça de Portugal for the first time after defeating Benfica 2–1 in the final.[4] A year later, the club finished as runners-up to S.L. Benfica by two points,[6] and defended their cup title by defeating Vitória de Guimarães 2–1 in the 1976 final at rival Porto's Estádio das Antas; Pedroto left for Porto at the end of the season.

Experienced English manager Jimmy Hagan led the club to its third Taça de Portugal win in five years after defeating Sporting CP 1–0 in the replay of the 1979 final, after a 1–1 draw occurred the day prior.[7] At the beginning of the following season, Porto and Boavista organised the first edition of the Portuguese Supercup, a season-opening match between the league and cup holders. The match was contested at the Estádio das Antas, and Boavista (with new manager Mário Lino) beat Pedroto's Porto 2–1 in a violent match where Boavista had two men sent off.[8]

From contenders to Champions and European forays (1980–2003)Edit

 
The panther is the club symbol and nickname.

In 1997, Valentim Loureiro was succeeded as president by his son João, who at 34 was the youngest in the whole league.[6] Also, former Portugal international Jaime Pacheco was appointed manager, and led the club to runners-up in 1999 and fourth place in 2000. In 2000–01, they won the derby in the second half of the season against Porto and went on to win the league with a 3–0 win over C.D. Aves on 18 May.[9] This was only the second time that a team from outside the Big Three won the league, after C.F. Os Belenenses in 1946. Pacheco's team conceded just 22 goals in 34 games and lost at home only once.[9] The team featured Ricardo in goal, academy product Petit in midfield, Bolivian free-kick specialist Erwin Sánchez in attacking midfield, Duda and Martelinho on the wings, and Brazilian striker Elpídio Silva was the club's top scorer with 11 goals.[9]

After finishing runners-up to Sporting a year later, the squad began to break up, with Petit heading to Benfica and fellow midfielder Pedro Emanuel going to Porto; both skippered their new teams.[9] The club rebuilt the Estádio do Bessa for UEFA Euro 2004, contributing to their financial problems.[9] Pacheco left for Spain's RCD Mallorca in 2003, returning soon to replace Sánchez briefly as manager the following year, and came back again in October 2006.[10]

Boavista were regulars in UEFA competitions in the 1990 and early 2000s. In the 2002–03 UEFA Cup, they reached the semi-finals before a 2–1 aggregate loss to Celtic due to a late Henrik Larsson strike; they would have faced Porto in the final.[11]

Downfall and return (2008–present)Edit

In June 2008, Boavista was sentenced to relegation for its part in the Apito Dourado (Golden Whistle) matchfixing scandal, for three games in the 2003–04 season.[12] A year later the club was relegated again: originally saved by promoted club F.C. Vizela being sanctioned for corruption, the team withdrew from the second division for financial reasons.[13]

In January 2013, João Loureiro, pressed by thousands of members of the club to return to the presidency, was elected president once again. After a long legal battle, in June 2013, Boavista was entitled the right to come back to the Primeira Liga.[14][15] Also, after a negotiation with the creditors of the club, the €65 million debt was cut in half.[16] After a six-year absence, Boavista returned to the Primeira Liga in the 2014–15 season, coached by Petit, a member of the title-winning side of 2001.[17]

In October 2020, Boavista's members approved of investment from Spanish-Luxembourgish businessman Gérard Lopez, owner of Ligue 1 club Lille OSC.[18]

HonoursEdit

  • Winners (2): 1936–37, 1949–50
  • Winners (1): 1913–14

League and cup historyEdit

The club has made 55 appearances at the top level of Portuguese football and has won the Portuguese cup five times. In 1979, it also won the very first edition of the national supercup.

Season League Cup League Cup Europe Other Competitions Top scorer
Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Comp Pos Comp Pos Player Goals
1934–35p 2D.4 1 6 6 0 0 36 5 12 Not held
1935–36r 1D 6 14 4 3 7 24 39 11 Costuras 5
1936–37 2D.2 1 6 4 1 1 22 12 9
1937–38 2D.1 1 6 5 0 1 20 6 10
1938–39 2D.DL 2 10 6 1 3 27 14 13
1939–40p 2D.DL 1 8 7 0 1 30 11 14 Quarter-Final
1940–41r 1D 8 14 2 1 11 12 63 5 R16 Leonel Loureiro 3
1941–42 2D.2.1 2 14 9 2 3 63 23 20
1942–43 2D.2.2 2 10 6 2 2 26 13 14
1943–44 2D.2.2 2 14 12 1 1 76 23 25
1944–45p 2D.2 1 8 6 2 0 35 11 14 Quarter-Final
1945–46 1D 11 22 6 0 16 39 73 12 Quarter-Final Barros 12
1946–47 1D 9 26 7 6 13 52 74 20 Not held Fernando Caiado 19
1947–48 1D 9 26 9 2 15 40 65 20 R32 Fernando Caiado 12
1948–49r 1D 14 26 4 6 16 35 89 14 R32 Serafim Baptista 10
1949–50p 2D.B 2 18 12 1 5 56 21 25 Not held
1950–51 1D 10 26 10 3 13 50 62 23 R16 Barros
Duarte
12
1951–52 1D 5 26 12 1 13 47 55 25 R16 Gaston 15
1952–53 1D 9 26 7 6 13 35 54 20 R16 Manero 6
1953–54 1D 11 26 7 5 14 29 66 19 Semi-Final Manero 7
1954–55r 1D 13 26 7 4 15 33 71 18 R32 Manero 9
1955–56 2D.N 1 26 16 6 4 77 35 38
1956–57 2D.N 6 26 13 3 10 54 45 29 R32
1957–58 2D.N 3 26 16 2 8 56 38 34
1958–59p 2D.N 2 26 17 4 5 78 43 38
1959–60r 1D 14 26 4 4 18 27 81 12 R64 Adriano Teixeira 7
1960–61 2D.N 3 26 14 1 11 56 35 29 R32
1961–62 2D.N 5 26 10 8 8 30 30 28 R64
1962–63 2D.N 11 26 9 3 14 35 52 21 R64
1963–64 2D.N 9 26 8 8 10 45 60 24 R32
1964–65 2D.N 10 26 9 6 11 37 37 24 R32
1965–66r 2D.N 14 26 6 7 13 31 45 19 R64
1966–67 3D.2 1 10 6 1 3 15 7 13
1967–68p 3D.2 1 10 6 2 2 25 11 14
1968–69p 2D 1 26 17 5 4 57 21 39 1st Round
1969–70 1D 12 26 6 6 14 35 61 18 R16 Moura 9
1970–71 1D 6 26 9 4 13 18 38 22 R16 Taí
Moinhos
Juvenal
Alexandre
3
1971–72 1D 11 30 7 10 13 28 46 24 R32 Jorge Félix 7
1972–73 1D 7 30 12 7 11 41 47 31 R32 Moinhos 14
1973–74 1D 9 30 9 7 14 35 43 25 Quarter-Final Rufino 9
1974–75 1D 4 30 16 6 8 58 32 38 Winner Salvador 14
1975–76 1D 2 30 21 6 3 65 23 48 Winner CWC 2nd Round João Alves 15
1976–77 1D 4 30 13 8 9 41 33 34 R32 CWC 2nd Round Celso Pita 14
1977–78 1D 7 30 10 8 12 36 38 28 R16 UC 1st Round Albertino Pereira 13
1978–79 1D 9 30 12 3 15 36 40 27 Winner Jorge Gomes 11
1979–80 1D 4 30 15 7 8 44 30 37 Quarter-Final CWC 2nd Round Supertaça Winner Júlio 12
1980–81 1D 4 30 14 8 8 36 25 36 R16 UC 2nd Round Júlio 13
1981–82 1D 9 30 10 6 14 36 37 26 R32 UC 2nd Round Diamantino 8
1982–83 1D 5 30 12 6 12 32 38 30 Quarter-Final Reinaldo 9
1983–84 1D 7 30 12 7 11 36 31 31 2nd Round Jorge Silva 13
1984–85 1D 4 30 13 11 6 37 26 37 Quarter-Final Filipović 10
1985–86 1D 5 30 14 8 8 44 29 36 R64 UC 1st Round Tonanha 9
1986–87 1D 8 30 9 9 12 34 36 27 Quarter-Final UC 2nd Round Coelho 7
1987–88 1D 5 38 16 14 8 42 25 46 Quarter-Final Parente 8
1988–89 1D 3 38 19 11 8 56 29 49 R32 Jorge Andrade 11
1989–90 1D 8 34 13 8 13 49 36 34 R16 UC 1st Round Isaías 12
1990–91 1D 4 38 15 11 12 53 46 41 Semi-Final Jorge Andrade 13
1991–92s 1D 3 34 16 12 6 45 27 44 Winner UC 2nd Round Ricky 30
1992–93 1D 4 34 14 11 9 46 34 39 RU CWC 2nd Round Supertaça Winner Ricky 14
1993–94 1D 4 34 16 6 12 46 31 38 R16 UC Quarter-Final Marlon Brandão 9
1994–95 1D 9 34 12 8 14 40 49 32 R16 UC 2nd Round Artur 16
1995–96 1D 4 34 19 8 7 59 28 65 R16 Artur 14
1996–97 1D 7 34 12 13 9 62 39 49 Winner UC 3rd Round Jimmy Hasselbaink 20
1997–98 1D 6 34 15 10 9 54 31 55 Quarter-Final CWC 1st Round Supertaça Winner Ayew 16
1998–99 1D 2 34 20 11 3 57 29 71 Quarter-Final Ayew
Timofte
15
1999–00 1D 4 34 16 7 11 40 31 55 Quarter-Final CL Group Stage Whelliton 11
2000–01c 1D 1 34 23 8 3 63 22 77 Semi-Final UC 2nd Round Elpídio Silva 11
2001–02 1D 2 34 21 7 6 53 20 70 R16 CL 2nd Group Stage Supertaça RU Elpídio Silva 8
2002–03 1D 10 34 10 13 11 32 31 43 R32 CL
UC
3rd Qualifying Round
Semi-Final
Elpídio Silva 10
2003–04 1D 8 34 12 11 11 32 31 47 R32 Ricardo Sousa 14
2004–05 1D 6 34 13 11 10 39 43 50 Semi-Final Zé Manel 10
2005–06 1D 6 34 12 14 8 37 29 50 Quarter-Final João V. Pinto 9
2006–07 1D 10 30 8 11 11 32 34 35 Quarter-Final Roland Linz 10
2007–08R 1D 9 30 8 12 10 32 41 36 R16 2nd Round Jorge Ribeiro 8
2008–09r 2D 15 30 9 5 16 28 44 32 R32 João Tomás 12
2009–10 3D.N 7 28 10 7 11 34 38 37 Diogo Fonseca 11
2010–11 3D.C 2 30 16 8 6 46 25 56 Beré 14
2011–12 3D.C 4 30 15 5 10 43 31 50 Fary 8
2012–13 3D.N 10 30 9 11 10 44 40 38 1st Round Fary 15
2013–14P 3D.N 4 32 21 5 6 59 26 68 2nd Round Bobô 18
2014–15 1D 13 34 9 7 18 27 50 34 R64 Group Stage Zé Manuel 6
2015–16 1D 14 34 8 9 17 24 41 33 Quarter-Final 2nd Round Zé Manuel 6
2016–17 1D 9 34 10 13 11 33 36 43 R32 2nd Round Iuri Medeiros 7
2017–18 1D 8 34 13 6 15 35 44 45 R64 2nd Round Mateus 6
2018–19 1D 8 34 13 5 16 34 40 44 R16 2nd Round Mateus 5
2019–20 1D 12 34 10 9 15 28 39 39 R64 2nd Round Heriberto Tavares 4
Season Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Cup League Cup Comp Pos Comp Pos Player Goals
^s Top scorer
^c Champions
^p Promoted
^P Promoted in court
^r Relegated
^R Relegated in court

As of 24 May 2019

Sources: Soccer Library,[19] Zero a Zero, [20] Fora de Jogo. [21]

European recordEdit

OverviewEdit

Competition Appearances Matches Títles Best
UEFA Champions League 3 24 (7W 8D 9L) - Second Group Stage/Last 16 (2001/2002)
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 5 18 (6W 7D 5L) - Last 16 (1975-76,1976-77,1979-80,1992-93)
UEFA Europa League 12 58 (25W 9D 24L) - Semi-final (2002-03)
Total 20 100 (38W 25D 38L)

MatchesEdit

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Aggregate
1975–76 Cup Winners' Cup First round   Spartak Trnava 3–0 0–0 3–0
Second round   Celtic 0–0 1–3 1–3
1976–77 Cup Winners' Cup First round   CSU Galați 2–0 3–2 5–2
Second round   Levski Sofia 3–1 0–2 3–3 (a)
1977–78 UEFA Cup First round   Lazio 1–0 0–5 1–5
1979–80 Cup Winners' Cup First round   Sliema Wanderers 8–0 1–2 9–2
Second round   Dynamo Moscow 1–1 0–0 1–1 (a)
1980–81 UEFA Cup First round   Vasas 0–1 2–0 2–1
Second round   Sochaux 0–1 2–2 2–3
1981–82 UEFA Cup First round   Atlético Madrid 4–1 1–3 5–4
Second round   Valencia 0–2 1–0 1–2
1985–86 UEFA Cup First round   Club Brugge 4–3 1–3 5–6
1986–87 UEFA Cup First round   Fiorentina 1–0 (3–1 (p)) 0–1 1–1
Second round   Rangers 0–1 1–2 1–3
1989–90 UEFA Cup First round   FC Karl-Marx-Stadt 2–2 (aet) 0–1 2–3
1991–92 UEFA Cup First round   Internazionale 2–1 0–0 2–1
Second round   Torino 0–0 0–2 0–2
1992–93 Cup Winners' Cup First round   Valur 3–0 0–0 3–0
Second round   Parma 0–2 0–0 0–2
1993–94 UEFA Cup First round   Union Luxembourg 4–0 1–0 5–0
Second round   Lazio 2–0 0–1 1–1
Third round   OFI Crete 2–0 4–1 6–1
Quarter-finals   Karlsruher SC 1–1 0–1 1–2
1994–95 UEFA Cup First round   MYPA 2–1 1–1 3–2
Second round   Napoli 1–1 1–2 2–3
1996–97 UEFA Cup First round   Odense 1–2 3–2 4–4 (a)
Second round   Dinamo Tbilisi 5–0 0–1 5–1
Third round   Internazionale 0–2 1–5 1–7
1997–98 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup First round   Shakhtar Donetsk 2–3 1–1 3–4
1999–00 UEFA Champions League Q3   Brøndby 4–2 (aet) 2–1 6–3
Group C   Rosenborg 0–3 0–2 4th place
  Feyenoord 1–1 1–1
  Borussia Dortmund 1–0 1–3
2000–01 UEFA Cup Qualif. round   Barry Town 2–0 3–0 5–0
First round   Vorskla Poltava 2–1 2–1 4–2
Second round   Roma 1–1 0–1 1–2
2001–02 UEFA Champions League Group B   Liverpool 1–1 1–1 2nd place
  Dynamo Kyiv 3–1 0–1
  Borussia Dortmund 2–1 1–2
Group A   Manchester United 0–3 0–3 3rd place
  Nantes 1–0 1–1
  Bayern Munich 0–0 0–1
2002–03 UEFA Champions League Q2   Hibernians 4–0 3–3 7–3
Q3   Auxerre 0–1 0–0 0–1
2002–03 UEFA Cup First round   Maccabi Tel Aviv 4–1 0–1 4–2
Second round   Anorthosis Famagusta 2–1 1–0 3–1
Third round   Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 1–2 2–2 (a)
Fourth round   Hertha BSC 1–0 2–3 3–3 (a)
Quarter-finals   Málaga 1–0 (4–1 (p)) 0–1 1–1
Semi-finals   Celtic 0–1 1–1 1–2

PlayersEdit

First-team squadEdit

As of 10 January 2021[22]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK   BRA Rafael Bracalli
2 DF   USA Reggie Cannon
3 DF   FRA Adil Rami
4 DF   MEX Alejandro Gómez (on loan from Atlas)
5 DF   NGA Chidozie Awaziem (on loan from Porto)
6 MF   ESP Javi García
7 MF   POR Nuno Santos (on loan from Benfica)
8 MF   BRA Gustavo Sauer
9 FW   HON Jorge Benguché (on loan from Olimpia)
10 MF   ENG Angel Gomes (on loan from Lille)
11 FW   GAM Yusupha Njie
16 MF   POR Miguel Reisinho
17 FW   HON Alberth Elis
No. Pos. Nation Player
19 DF   POR Ricardo Mangas
20 GK   BRA Léo Jardim (on loan from Lille)
21 DF   ECU Jackson Porozo
22 DF   BRA Nathan (on loan from Vasco da Gama)
23 MF   ANG Show (on loan from Lille)
24 MF   COL Sebastián Pérez (on loan from Boca Juniors)
25 DF   FRA Yanis Hamache
27 FW   VEN Jeriel De Santis
30 MF   BRA Paulinho
42 DF   COL Cristian Devenish (on loan from Atlético Nacional)
73 FW   POR Tiago Morais
99 GK   POR João Gonçalves

Retired numbersEdit

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
29 FW   POR Edu Ferreira (23 April 1997 – 24 December 2017[23])

CoachesEdit

Since 1970

StadiumEdit

 
Outside photo

The Estádio do Bessa (later Estádio do Bessa XXI) is Boavista's home ground, used for football and occasionally for music concerts. The stadium was first used in 1911, then known as 'Campo do Bessa'.

The stadium had several renovations in its history, namely in 1967–72, where turf was installed as well as floodlights. Like other stadiums used in UEFA Euro 2004, the stadium was rebuilt for the competition, but on top of the old stands, and each one of them at a different time, allowing Boavista to continue playing there. It cost €45,164,726, from which €7,785,735 were supported from the Portuguese state, and featured an all-seater capacity of 28,263 spectators.[24] Plans for improvement actually existed before the organization of the Euro 2004 was given to Portugal in 1999, and by then, the first works were already underway. It was designed by Grupo 3 Arquitectura.

The stadium has also been used several times in matches of the Portuguese national team.

ColoursEdit

Boavista's black-and-white chequered shirt was introduced by journalist and club president Artur Oliveira Valença, based on a French team he had seen.[4]

Kit evolutionEdit

 
 
 
 
 
Boavista's first home colours
 
 
 
 
 
Second home colours
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Third home colours
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fourth home colours
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1933–Present

Women's teamEdit

The women's team is one of the strongest in Portugal, having won several titles in a row during the 1990s, as well as the formation U-19, U-17. U-15 and U-13 teams, that won all national championships, and brought up several talented and famous international players.

See alsoEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Kennedy, Peter; Kassimeris, Christos (22 March 2016). Exploring the Cultural, Ideological and Economic Legacies of Euro 2012. Routledge. ISBN 9781317602149.
  2. ^ "Boavista vs. Porto". www.footballderbies.com. Retrieved 16 February 2018.
  3. ^ a b c Caetano, Filipe (31 July 2003). "Boavista, 100 anos: no princípio eram os "footballers"" [Boavista, 100 years: in the beginning were the "footballers"] (in Portuguese). Mais Futebol. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Costa, Luís Octávio (28 May 2001). "No princípio eram os Boavista Footballers..." [In the beginning were the Boavista Footballers]. Público (in Portuguese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  5. ^ Caetano, Filipe (31 July 2003). "Boavista, 100 anos: do profissionalismo ao abismo" [Boavista, 100 years: from professionalism to the abyss] (in Portuguese). Mais Futebol. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  6. ^ a b Caetano, Filipe (31 July 2003). "Boavista, 100 anos: Pedroto, Valentim e o "Boavistão"" [Boavista, 100 years: Pedroto, Valentim and "Boavistão"] (in Portuguese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  7. ^ "Sob o signo de Pedroto" [Under Pedroto's sign]. Record (in Portuguese). 25 May 2007. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  8. ^ Tovar, Rui Miguel (3 August 2019). "Supertaça: No balneário é que é bom" [Supertaça: It's good to be in the changing room]. Sábado (in Portuguese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  9. ^ a b c d e "When Boavista shocked the world: Portugal's most unlikely champions". PortuGOAL. 1 June 2016. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  10. ^ Pimentel, José Nuno (25 October 2006). "Pacheco completes Portuguese set". UEFA. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  11. ^ "Larsson strike books final spot". BBC Sport. 24 April 2003. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  12. ^ Freches, Silvia (25 June 2008). "Um processo polémico que levou à descida de divisão do Boavista" [A controversial decision led to Boavista's relegation]. Diário de Notícias (in Portuguese). Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  13. ^ "Boavista desiste de participar na Vitalis" [Boavista decline participating in the Vitalis]. Record (in Portuguese). 13 July 2009. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  14. ^ "Boavista back in the top flight". theportugalnews.com. 18 April 2013. Archived from the original on 10 January 2015. Retrieved 10 January 2015.
  15. ^ "Boavista back in the top flight in 2013/14". portugoal.info. 6 April 2013. Archived from the original on 4 June 2015. Retrieved 10 January 2015.
  16. ^ "Boavista com perdão de 33 milhões em dívida" [Boavista pardoned of 33 million debt]. O Jornal Económico (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on 16 March 2016. Retrieved 16 February 2018.
  17. ^ Castro, Gaspar (11 August 2014). "O Boavista veio para ficar" [Boavista is here to stay] (in Portuguese). SAPO. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  18. ^ "Sócios do Boavista aprovam parceria com o grupo de Gérard Lopez" [Boavista members approve of partnership with Gérard Lopez's group]. Record (in Portuguese). 10 October 2020. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  19. ^ "Portugal – Table of Honor – soccerlibrary.free.fr" (PDF). Soccer Library. Retrieved 17 June 2012.
  20. ^ "Boavista Futebol Clube – Portugal – footballzz.co.uk". ZeroZero. Retrieved 17 June 2012.
  21. ^ "Boavista Futebol Clube - ForaDeJogo - foradejogo.net". ForaDeJogo. Retrieved 17 June 2012.
  22. ^ https://boavistafc.pt/futebol/
  23. ^ "Número 29 do Boavista será para sempre de Edu Ferreira" [Boavista's number 29 will be Edu Ferreira's forever]. Jornal de Notícias (in Portuguese). 2 January 2018. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  24. ^ "Estádio do Bessa Século XXI – StadiumDB.com". stadiumdb.com. Retrieved 16 February 2018.

External linksEdit