Blue Grit

A Blue Grit,[1][2][3] also known as a Blue Liberal[4][5][6][7] or Business Liberal[8] is a member or supporter of the Liberal Party of Canada or many of the provincial Liberal parties[9] who adheres to fiscal conservatism and is supportive of pro-business policies, and thus is right-leaning fiscally and economically, but generally socially progressive. Notable Blue Grits include former Prime Minister John Turner[10] [11], former Prime Minister Paul Martin[2][5], former deputy prime minister John Manley[5][12], Martha Hall Findlay[5][13], Frank McKenna[5][7] and Roy MacLaren.[5] The term has also been applied to former Progressive Conservative Party of Canada members who are now Liberals, such as Scott Brison, David Orchard and John Herron.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Greg Weston (June 13, 2010). "Tories win in Grit-NDP merger". QMI Agency. Toronto Sun.
  2. ^ a b Ken Gray (April 7, 2010). "Red Tory, Blue Grit". The Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on November 13, 2014. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  3. ^ Ron Graham (October 2013). "Born in the Burbs". The Walrus.
  4. ^ Jessy Brunette (January 14, 2011). "'I was a very blue Liberal,' Reynolds says". The Sudbury Star. Archived from the original on November 13, 2014. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Steven Chase (April 13, 2013). "As leadership race winds down, Liberals still divided on an economic plan". The Globe and Mail.
  6. ^ Patrick Brethour (August 24, 2012). "Canada's new electoral divide: It's about the money". The Globe and Mail.
  7. ^ a b Daniel Leblanc; Steven Chase & Jane Taber (December 15, 2012). "How the Liberal Party lost Mark Carney". The Globe and Mail.
  8. ^ Joan Bryden (October 14, 2012). "Long-shots plunge into Liberal leadership race". The Canadian Press. Metro. Archived from the original on November 13, 2014. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  9. ^ Rob Ferguson (September 5, 2014). "Provincial Tories plan major 're-think' of party policy". Toronto Star.
  10. ^ Tuns, Paul (June 16, 2014). "30 years of Liberal infighting". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  11. ^ "Five stories we're watching". Maclean's. October 1, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  12. ^ Michael Den Tandt (May 1, 2014). "Is Justin Trudeau's honeymoon over?". canada.com.
  13. ^ Ian Lee (April 16, 2013). "No longer hyphenated, Liberals cast aside the business faction". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 26, 2014.