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Big Quilcene River

The Big Quilcene River is a river on the Olympic Peninsula in the U.S. state of Washington. It rises in the Buckhorn Wilderness near Marmot Pass, south of Buckhorn Mountain, and near Mount Constance. It flows generally east through the Olympic Mountains and the Olympic National Forest. After flowing south briefly the river is joined by Tunnel Creek and again flows east. It cuts through the Quilcene Range of the Olympic Mountains in which it collects a number of tributaries, including Mile And A Half Creek.[2] Near Rainbow Campground the river turns north and is paralleled by U.S. Route 101. In its last few miles the river turns east and flows by the south side of Quilcene before emptying into Quilcene Bay, part of Hood Canal. The Little Quilcene River enters Quilcene Bay less than a mile to the north.[3]

Big Quilcene River
BigQuilcene1.jpg
Big Quilcene River
Big Quilcene River is located in Washington (state)
Big Quilcene River
Location of the mouth of the Big Quilcene River in Washington
Big Quilcene River is located in the United States
Big Quilcene River
Big Quilcene River (the United States)
Location
CountryUnited States
StateWashington
CountyJefferson
Physical characteristics
SourceOlympic Mountains
 ⁃ coordinates47°48′52″N 123°7′9″W / 47.81444°N 123.11917°W / 47.81444; -123.11917[1]
MouthHood Canal
 ⁃ coordinates
47°49′7″N 122°51′46″W / 47.81861°N 122.86278°W / 47.81861; -122.86278Coordinates: 47°49′7″N 122°51′46″W / 47.81861°N 122.86278°W / 47.81861; -122.86278[1]

The name "Quilcene" comes from the Twana word /qʷəʔlsíd/, referring to a tribal group[4] and the name of an aboriginal Twana village and community on Quilcene Bay.[5]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Big Quilcene River
  2. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Mile and A Half Creek
  3. ^ General course info from USGS topographic maps accessed via the "GNIS in Google Map" feature of the USGS Geographic Names Information System website.
  4. ^ Bright, William (2004). Native American Placenames of the United States. University of Oklahoma Press. p. 404. ISBN 978-0-8061-3598-4. Retrieved 1 September 2019.
  5. ^ Elmendorf, William (1993). Twana Narratives: Native Historical Accounts of a Coast Salish Culture. UBC Press. p. 279. ISBN 978-0-7748-0475-2. Retrieved 1 September 2019.

External linksEdit