The Bharat Swati (or sometimes BHEL Swati) is an Indian two-seat training monoplane designed by the Technical Centre of Directorate General of Civil Aviation and built by Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited.[2]

Swati
BHEL Swati.jpg
Role Two-seat training monoplane
National origin India
Manufacturer Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited
Designer Directorate General of Civil Aviation
First flight 17 November 1990
Number built ~20
Unit cost
3.8 million (1998)[1]

Design and developmentEdit

The Swati is a low-wing cantilever monoplane with a steel tube fuselage covered in fabric at the rear and composite material at the front.[2] It has metal tail surfaces and wooden wings and a fixed landing gear with a steerable nosewheel.[2] The Swati has a 116 hp (87 kW) Lycoming O-235 piston engine at the front driving a two-bladed propeller.[2] Directorate General of Civil Aviation ordered 40 to be distributed to civil flying clubs in India.

VariantsEdit

LT-1M Swati
LT-2M Swati

SpecificationsEdit

Data from Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory 1996[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 7.21 m (23 ft 8 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.2 m (30 ft 3 in)
  • Height: 2.78 m (9 ft 1½ in)
  • Wing area: 11.96 m2 (128.74 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 530 kg (1168 lb)
  • Gross weight: 770 kg ( lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-235-N2C piston engine, 87 kW (116 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 268 km/h (167 mph)
  • Cruising speed: 195 km/h (121 mph)
  • Range: 453 km (282 miles)
  • Endurance: 2 hours  45 min
  • Service ceiling: 3050 m (10000 ft)

Armament

Incidents and AccidentsEdit

On 3 June 1993 a Swati aircraft registration number VT-STC being test flown at Haridwar crashed when its starboard wing broke off after coming out of a loop killing the test pilot.[3]

On 29 November 2001 a Swati LT II aircraft registration number VT-STO of the Kerala Aviation Training Centre on a training flight at Tiruvanantpuram crashed due to pilot error destroying the aircraft.[4]

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-09-03. Retrieved 2011-06-02.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ a b c d e Taylor 1996, p. 401
  3. ^ CIVIL AVIATION AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR 1993 DGCA 2 February 2016
  4. ^ CIVIL AVIATION AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR 2001 DGCA 3 February 2016

BibliographyEdit