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Beverley (UK Parliament constituency)

Beverley has been the name of a parliamentary constituency in the East Riding of Yorkshire for three periods. From medieval times until 1869 it was a parliamentary borough consisting of a limited electorate of property owners of its early designated borders within the market town of Beverley, which returned (elected) two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of the English and Welsh-turned-UK Parliament during that period (sometimes called burgesses).

Beverley
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Beverley in Humberside, showing boundaries used from 1983-1997
CountyEast Riding of Yorkshire
19831997
Number of membersOne
Replaced byBeverley and Holderness Haltemprice and Howden
Created fromHaltemprice
19501955
Number of membersOne
Type of constituencyCounty constituency
Replaced byHaltemprice and Howden
Created fromBuckrose, Holderness and Howdenshire
1563–1869
Number of membersTwo
Type of constituencyBorough constituency
Replaced byEast Riding of Yorkshire
Created fromYorkshire
1295–1306
Type of constituencyBorough constituency
Replaced byYorkshire

A form of a Beverley seat was revived for a single-member county constituency created in 1950, abolished in 1955, and similarly between the 1983 and 1992 general elections inclusive after which the area was largely incorporated into one 1997-created seat Beverley and Holderness; the remainder of the seat contributed to two other late 20th century-created seats.

HistoryEdit

The Parliamentary BoroughEdit

Beverley was first represented in the Model Parliament of 1295, but after 1306 it did not elect members again until 1563. Thereafter it maintained two members until being disfranchised in 1870. The borough consisted of the three parishes of the town of Beverley, and by 1831 had a population of 7,432 and 1,928 houses. The right of election was vested not in the population as a whole, but in the freemen of the borough, whether resident or not; at the contested election of 1826, 2,276 votes were cast. The borough was large enough to retain two members under the compromise of the Reform Act of 1832 when its boundaries were slightly extended to include some outlying fringes, increasing the population by roughly 800. The first of three progressive Acts, by the third Act in 1885 were such boroughs more equally thus fairly apportioned.

For much of the borough's history, elections in Beverley were notorious for their corruption. In 1727, one of the victorious candidates was unseated on petition, his agents were imprisoned and Parliament passed a new Bribery Act as a result. Between 1857 and 1868 six petitions were lodged against election results, of which three succeeded in voiding the election and unseating one or more of the victors. After the 1868 election, the writ for the borough was suspended and a Royal Commission appointed to inquire into the conduct of elections in Beverley; when it reported that it had found proof of extensive bribery, an Act of Parliament was passed permanently depriving Beverley of the right to return Members of Parliament, abolishing the constituency and incorporating it within the East Riding constituency.

The novelist Anthony Trollope was one of the defeated candidates in the final corrupt election for which Beverley was disfranchised. He drew on his experience directly for his description of the Percycross election in his novel Ralph the Heir, and also told the story in his Autobiography. He found that corruption was taken for granted and that the price of a vote was between 15 shillings and £1. His unsuccessful campaign cost him £400. Sir Henry Edwards and Edmund Hegan Kennard were those candidates deemed elected Members of Parliament in this final contest for the constituency.

1950 to 1955Edit

The Beverley constituency which existed from 1950 to 1955 was a predominantly rural one. Under the boundary revisions introduced by the Representation of the People Act 1948, which came into effect at the 1950 general election, the three existing county constituencies of the East Riding were abolished, and the county was divided into two new constituencies, each named after their biggest towns - Bridlington and Beverley. The new Beverley constituency comprised the western half of the Riding. This encompassed parts of all three of the county's previously existing constituencies (Buckrose, Holderness and Howdenshire).

The Beverley constituency was abolished in further boundary changes implemented at the 1955 general election, being divided between the new Haltemprice and Howden seats.

1983 to 1997Edit

Beverley again became a constituency name in 1983, this time for a constituency mostly suburban in character. The new constituency replaced, and strongly resembled, the Haltemprice constituency which had been introduced in 1955: its main components apart from Beverley were the prosperous suburbs to the north and west of Hull, such as Cottingham, Anlaby and Kirk Ella.

The Beverley constituency was abolished in 1997 general election, Beverley itself moving to the new Beverley and Holderness constituency.

BoundariesEdit

1950-1955: The Borough of Beverley, the Urban District of Norton, and the Rural Districts of Beverley, Derwent, Howden, Norton, and Pocklington.

1983-1997: The East Yorkshire Borough of Beverley wards of Anlaby, Brough, Castle, Hessle East, Hessle West, Kirk Ella, Leconfield, Leven, Mill Beck and Croxby, Minster North, Minster South, Molescroft, Priory, St Mary's East, St Mary's West, Springfield, Swanland, Tickton, Willerby, and Woodmansey.

Members of ParliamentEdit

Beverley boroughEdit

1563–1660Edit

Parliament Year First member Second member
Parliament of 1563–1567 Nicholas Bacon Robert Hall
Parliament of 1571 Edward Ellerker Thomas Layton
Parliament of 1572–1583 Richard Topcliffe Thomas Aglionby
Parliament of 1584–1585 Robert Wrote John Stanhope
Parliament of 1586–1587 Michael Wharton George Purefoy
Parliament of 1588–1589 Lancelot Alford John Truslove
Parliament of 1593 John Mansfield Edward Alford
Parliament of 1597–1598 Thomas Crompton Edward Fraunceys
Parliament of 1601 Edward Fraunceys Randolph Ewens
Parliament of 1604–1611 William Gee Allan Percy
Addled Parliament (1614) William Towse Edmund Scott
Parliament of 1621–1622 Sir Christopher Hilliard
Happy Parliament (1624–1625) Sir Henry Vane the elder,
replaced 1624 by Sir Henry Carey
Useless Parliament (1625) Sir John Hotham, Bt Sir William Alford
Parliament of 1625–1626
Parliament of 1628–1629
No Parliament summoned 1629–1640
Short Parliament (1640) Sir John Hotham, Bt Michael Warton
Long Parliament (1640–1653) 1640 Sir John Hotham, Bt (Royalist)
disabled to sit, September 1643
Michael Warton (Royalist)
disabled to sit, January 1644
1645 James Nelthorpe John Nelthorpe
1648 John Nelthorpe excluded in Pride's Purge
Barebones Parliament (1653) Beverley not represented
First Protectorate Parliament (1654–1655) Francis Thorpe (One member only)
Second Protectorate Parliament (1656–1658)
Third Protectorate Parliament (1659) Thomas Strickland John Anlaby
Long Parliament (restored, 1659–1660) James Nelthorpe

1660–1869Edit

Year First member[1] First party Second member[1] Second party
April 1660 Hugh Bethall [2] Sir John Hotham, Bt
June 1660 Michael Warton
1685 Sir Ralph Warton
1689 Sir Michael Warton Tory Sir John Hotham, Bt
1689 Sir John Hotham, Bt
1690 William Gee
1695 Ralph Warton Tory
1701 William Gee Whig
1702 Sir Charles Hotham, Bt Whig
1705 John Moyser
1708 Sir Michael Warton
1722 Michael Newton
1723 Sir Charles Hotham, Bt Whig
1727 Ellerker Bradshaw [3] Whig Charles Pelham Tory
1729 Sir Charles Hotham, Bt Whig
1734 Ellerker Bradshaw Whig
1738 Charles Pelham Tory
1741 William Strickland
1747 Sir William Codrington, Bt
1754 John Tufnell
1761 Michael Newton George Tufnell
1768 Hugh Bethell Charles Anderson-Pelham
1772 Sir Griffith Boynton, Bt
1774 George Tufnell Sir James Pennyman, Bt
1780 Francis Evelyn Anderson
1784 Sir Christopher Sykes, Bt
1790 John Wharton Whig
1796 William Tatton Napier Christie Burton
1799 John Morritt Tory[4]
1802 John Wharton Whig[4]
1806 Richard Vyse
1807 Howard Vyse
1812 Charles Forbes Tory[4]
1818 Robert Christie Burton Tory[4]
1820 George Lane-Fox Tory
1826 John Stewart Tory[4] Charles Harrison Batley Tory[4]
1830 Daniel Sykes Whig[4][5] Henry Burton Whig[4][6]
1831 William Marshall Whig[4][5]
1832 Hon. Charles Langdale Whig[4][7]
1835 James Hogg Conservative[4]
1837 George Lane-Fox Conservative[4]
1840 Sackville Lane-Fox Conservative[4]
1841 John Towneley Whig[8][9][10][4]
1847 Sackville Lane-Fox Conservative[4]
1852 Hon. Francis Charles Lawley Radical[11] William Wells Radical[11]
1854 Hon. Arthur Hamilton-Gordon Peelite[12][13]
Mar. 1857 Edward Glover [14] Independent Conservative[15][16][17][18] Hon. William Denison Whig[19]
Aug. 1857 Henry Edwards Conservative
1859 Ralph Walters [20] Liberal
1860 James Walker Conservative
1865 Christopher Sykes Conservative
1868 Edmund Hegan Kennard Conservative

Writ suspended 1869, constituency abolished 1870

Beverley County Constituency (1950–1955)Edit

Election Member[1] Party
1950 George Odey Conservative
1955 constituency abolished

Beverley County Constituency (1983–1997)Edit

Election Member[1] Party
1983 Patrick Wall Conservative
1987 James Cran Conservative
1997 constituency abolished

ElectionsEdit

Elections in the 1830sEdit

General election 1830: Beverley[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Henry Burton 1,065 43.3
Whig Daniel Sykes 739 30.0
Tory Capel Cure 657 26.7
Majority 82 3.3
Turnout 1,420
Whig gain from Tory Swing
Whig gain from Tory Swing
General election 1831: Beverley [4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig William Marshall 734 41.1 +11.1
Whig Henry Burton 705 39.4 −3.9
Tory Charles Winn 349 19.5 −7.2
Majority 356 19.9 +16.6
Turnout 1,204
Whig hold Swing +7.4
Whig hold Swing −0.2
General election 1832: Beverley [21][4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Charles Langdale 516 35.1 −6.0
Whig Henry Burton 490 33.3 −6.1
Tory Charles Winn 464 31.6 +12.1
Majority 26 1.8 −18.1
Turnout 971 96.0
Registered electors 1,011
Whig hold Swing −6.0
Whig hold Swing −6.1
General election 1835: Beverley [21][4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Hogg 523 39.2 +7.6
Whig Henry Burton 497 37.3 +4.0
Whig Joseph Sykes 314 23.5 −11.6
Majority 26 1.9 N/A
Turnout 994 95.4 −0.6
Registered electors 1,042
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +7.6
Whig hold Swing +0.1
General election 1837: Beverley [21][4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Hogg 622 32.2 +12.6
Conservative George Lane-Fox 582 30.1 +10.5
Whig James Clay 380 19.7 −17.6
Whig George Rennie 347 18.0 −5.5
Majority 202 10.5 +8.6
Turnout 976 91.9 −3.5
Registered electors 1,062
Conservative hold Swing +12.1
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +11.0

Elections in the 1840sEdit

Lane-Fox resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, causing a by-election.

By-election, 24 January 1840: Beverley [21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Sackville Lane-Fox 556 57.6 −4.7
Whig Thomas Lamie Murray[22][23] 410 42.4 +4.7
Majority 146 15.1 +4.6
Turnout 966 91.7 −0.2
Registered electors 1,053
Conservative hold Swing −4.7
General election 1841: Beverley [21][4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Towneley 531 34.3 −3.4
Conservative James Hogg 529 34.2 +2.0
Conservative Sackville Lane-Fox 489 31.6 +1.5
Majority 2 0.1 N/A
Turnout 1,012 94.3 +2.4
Registered electors 1,073
Whig gain from Conservative Swing −3.4
Conservative hold Swing +1.9
General election 1847: Beverley [21][4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Towneley 543 40.5 +6.2
Conservative Sackville Lane-Fox 542 40.4 +8.8
Whig Isaac Goldsmid[24] 257 19.2 N/A
Turnout 671 (est) 49.4 (est) −44.9
Registered electors 1,357
Majority 1 0.0 −0.1
Whig hold Swing −1.3
Majority 285 21.2 N/A
Conservative hold Swing +1.3

Elections in the 1850sEdit

General election 1852: Beverley [21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical Francis Charles Lawley 611 36.1 N/A
Radical William Wells 584 34.5 N/A
Ind. Conservative Edward Glover[15] 497 29.4 N/A
Majority 87 5.1 N/A
Turnout 1,095 (est) 77.9 (est) +28.5
Registered electors 1,405
Radical gain from Conservative Swing N/A
Radical gain from Whig Swing N/A

Lawley resigned after he was found to have been using his position as secretary to the Chancellor of the Exchequer for insider trading,[25] causing a by-election.

By-election, 31 July 1854: Beverley [21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Peelite Arthur Hamilton-Gordon 493 72.0 N/A
Independent Liberal George Hastings[26] 192 28.0 N/A
Majority 301 43.9 N/A
Turnout 685 51.4 −26.5
Registered electors 1,333
Peelite gain from Radical Swing N/A
General election 1857: Beverley [21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig William Denison 566 35.5 N/A
Ind. Conservative Edward Glover 537 33.7 +8.3
Radical William Wells 492 30.8 −3.7
Turnout 798 (est) 70.2 (est) −7.7
Registered electors 1,136
Majority 29 1.8 N/A
Whig gain from Radical Swing N/A
Majority 45 2.8 N/A
Ind. Conservative gain from Radical Swing +5.1

Glover's election was declared void on petition, after he was found to have lied about meeting the required property qualifications, causing a by-election.[27][28][29]

By-election, 11 August 1857: Beverley [21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Henry Edwards 579 59.1 N/A
Radical William Wells[30] 401 40.9 +10.1
Majority 178 18.2 N/A
Turnout 980 86.3 +16.1
Registered electors 1,136
Conservative gain from Ind. Conservative Swing N/A
General election 1859: Beverley [21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Ralph Walters 605 37.0 −29.3
Conservative Henry Edwards 539 32.9 N/A
Conservative James Walker 439 26.8 N/A
Independent Edward Glover[31] 54 3.3 −30.4
Turnout 819 (est) 67.6 (est) −2.6
Registered electors 1,210
Majority 66 4.0 +2.2
Liberal hold Swing +0.6
Majority 485 29.6 N/A
Conservative gain from Ind. Conservative Swing N/A

Elections in the 1860sEdit

Walters' election was declared void on petition.

By-election, 31 Jan 1860: Beverley[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Walker 599 55.9 −3.8
Liberal Henry Gridley[32] 473 44.1 +7.1
Majority 126 11.8 −17.8
Turnout 1,072 88.4 +16.8
Registered electors 1,213
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing −5.5
General election 1865: Beverley [21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Henry Edwards 689 37.8 +4.9
Conservative Christopher Sykes 637 35.0 +8.2
Liberal David Keane[33] 495 27.2 −9.8
Majority 142 7.8 −21.8
Turnout 1,158 (est) 93.5 (est) +25.9
Registered electors 1,239
Conservative hold Swing +4.9
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +6.6
General election 1868: Beverley [34][21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Henry Edwards 1,132 30.2 −7.6
Conservative Edmund Hegan Kennard 986 26.3 −8.7
Liberal Marmaduke Maxwell 895 23.8 +10.2
Liberal Anthony Trollope 740 19.7 +6.1
Majority 91 2.4 −5.4
Turnout 1,877 (est) 70.2 (est) −23.3
Registered electors 2,672
Conservative hold Swing −8.9
Conservative hold Swing −7.4

A Royal Commission was appointed to investigate the seat and, after finding extensive bribery, the borough's writ was suspended, the election result voided, and the seat was absorbed into East Riding of Yorkshire.[21]

Elections in the 1950sEdit

General election 1950: Beverley [35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative George Odey 26,699 55.7 N/A
Labour Arnold William Gray 12,399 25.9 N/A
Liberal Harold Stewart Freemantle 7,719 16.1 N/A
Ind. Conservative G. Thorley 1,121 2.3 N/A
Majority 14,300 29.8 N/A
Turnout 83.0 N/A
Conservative win
General election 1951: Beverley [36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative George Odey 27,937 59.1 +3.4
Labour Thomas Brennan 12,778 27.1 +1.2
Liberal Harold Stewart Freemantle 6,522 13.8 -1.3
Majority 15,159 32.1 +2.3
Turnout 80.0 -3.0
Conservative hold Swing +1.1

Elections in the 1980sEdit

General election 1983: Beverley[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Patrick Wall 31,233 56.3 N/A
Liberal M. Pitts 17,364 31.3 N/A
Labour Elliot Morley 6,921 12.5 N/A
Majority 13,869 25.0 N/A
Turnout 73.2 N/A
Conservative win
General election 1987: Beverley[39][40]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Cran 31,459 52.2 −4.1
Liberal John Bryant 18,864 31.3 0.0
Labour Martin Shaw 9,901 16.4 +3.9
Majority 12,595 20.9 −4.1
Turnout 76.3 +3.1
Conservative hold Swing −2.1

Elections in the 1990sEdit

General election 1992: Beverley[41][42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Cran 34,503 53.3 +1.1
Liberal Democrat Andrew Collinge 17,986 27.8 −3.5
Labour Colin Challen 12,026 18.6 +2.1
Natural Law D Hetherington 199 0.3 +0.3
Majority 16,517 25.5 +4.6
Turnout 64,714 79.9 +3.6
Conservative hold Swing +2.3

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "B" (part 3)
  2. ^ Bethell was also elected for Hedon, which he chose to represent, and never sat for Beverley
  3. ^ Pelham and Bradshaw beat Hotham in the 1727 election, but on petition Hotham was declared elected in Bradshaw's place. Bradshaw's agents at Beverley were imprisoned, and the investigations led directly to the passing of the Bribery Act, 1729
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. pp. 142–144. Retrieved 18 August 2018 – via Google Books.
  5. ^ a b Baggs, A. P.; Brown, L. M.; Forster, G. C. F.; Hall, I.; Horrox, R. E.; Kent, G. H. R.; Neave, D. (1989). "Beverley, 1700–1835: Parliamentary Elections". In Allison, K. J. (ed.). A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 6, the Borough and Liberties of Beverley. London: British History Online. pp. 126–131. Retrieved 8 September 2019.
  6. ^ Churton, Edward (1836). The Assembled Commons or Parliamentary Biographer. p. 33. Retrieved 21 August 2018 – via Google Books.
  7. ^ "Knaresborough". London Morning Post. 29 June 1841. p. 3. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  8. ^ "The General Election". The Spectator. 26 June 1841. p. 6. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  9. ^ "Elections Decided". Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser. 10 July 1841. p. 6. Retrieved 9 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. ^ "State of the Poll". The Globe. 2 July 1841. p. 1. Retrieved 9 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. ^ a b "The New Parliament". Hull Advertiser and Exchange Gazette. 9 July 1852. p. 4. Retrieved 9 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  12. ^ Chapman, J. K. (1964). The Career of Arthur Hamilton Gordon: First Lord Stanmore 1829–1912. University of Toronto Press. ISBN 9781442654600 – via Google Books.
  13. ^ "To Correspondents". Yorkshire Gazette. 29 July 1854. p. 5. Retrieved 9 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  14. ^ Glover's election was declared void on petition, because he lacked the necessary property qualification to be a candidate, and a by-election held
  15. ^ a b "Beverley". The Morning Chronicle. 7 July 1852. p. 20. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  16. ^ "The Elections". Leeds Intelligencer. 10 July 1852. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 9 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  17. ^ Baggs, A. P.; Brown, L. M.; Forster, G. C. F.; Hall, I; Horrox, R. E.; Kent, G. H. R.; Neave, D. (1989). "Modern Beverley: Political and Social History, 1835–1918". In Allison, K. J. (ed.). A History of the County of York East Riding" Volume 6, the Borough and Liberties of Beverley. British History Online. London. pp. 141–148. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  18. ^ "Beverley Election". Hull Packet. 13 March 1857. p. 7. Retrieved 9 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  19. ^ "Our London Correspondent". Bicester Advertiser. 25 April 1857. p. 2. Retrieved 9 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  20. ^ Walters' election was declared void on petition because of corrupt practices, and a by-election held
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. pp. 43–44. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  22. ^ "Beverley Election". York Herald. 25 January 1840. pp. 2–3. Retrieved 27 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  23. ^ "Dublin Morning Register". 28 January 1840. p. 2. Retrieved 27 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  24. ^ "Election Intelligence". Wolverhampton Chronicle and Staffordshire Advertiser. 28 July 1847. p. 2. Retrieved 27 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  25. ^ Disraeli, Benjamin (1997). Wiebe, M.G. (ed.). Letters. University of Toronto Press. p. 349. ISBN 0-8020-4137-X. Retrieved 22 November 2008.
  26. ^ Goldman, Lawrence (2004). "Politics". Science, Reform and Politics in Victorian Britain: The Social Science Association 1857–1886. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 104. ISBN 0511037112. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  27. ^ Rix, Kathryn (13 April 2013). "MPs at the Old Bailey". The Victorian Commons. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  28. ^ Rix, Kathryn (13 December 2012). "Christmas at Newgate: Edward Glover MP and the abolition of the property qualification". The Victorian Commons. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  29. ^ Porritt, Edward; Porritt, Annie G. (1903). "Property Qualifications for Members". The Unreformed House of Commons: Parliamentary Representation Before 1832; Volume 1: England and Wales. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 177. ISBN 9781107640047. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  30. ^ "To the Electors of the Borough of Beverley". Hull Advertiser and Exchange Gazette. 8 August 1857. p. 4. Retrieved 10 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  31. ^ "Beverley". John Bull. 2 May 1859. pp. 5–6. Retrieved 10 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  32. ^ "Election Intelligence". Hull Packet. 3 February 1860. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 28 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  33. ^ "Election Intelligence". Bury and Norwich Post. 13 June 1865. p. 3. Retrieved 28 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  34. ^ "Modern Beverley: Political and Social History, 1835-1918", A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 6: The borough and liberties of Beverley (1989), pp. 141-148
  35. ^ UK General Election results: February 1950
  36. ^ UK General Election results: October 1951
  37. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  38. ^ UK General Election results: June 1983
  39. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  40. ^ UK General Election results: June 1987
  41. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  42. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2010.

SourcesEdit

  • F W S Craig, "British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885" (2nd edition, Aldershot: Parliamentary Research Services, 1989)
  • D Brunton & D H Pennington, “Members of the Long Parliament” (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1954)
  • Michael Kinnear, "The British Voter" (London: Batsford, 1968)
  • H G Nicholas, "To The Hustings" (London: Cassell & Co., 1956)
  • J Holladay Philbin, "Parliamentary Representation 1832 - England and Wales" (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1965)
  • Henry Stooks Smith, "The Parliaments of England from 1715 to 1847" (2nd edition, edited by FWS Craig - Chichester: Parliamentary Reference Publications, 1973)
  • Robert Waller, "The Almanac of British Politics" (3rd edition, London: Croom Helm, 1987)
  • Frederic A Youngs, jr, "Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Vol II" (London: Royal Historical Society, 1991)
  • Victoria County History of the East Riding of Yorkshire
  • "Beverley, 1700-1835 - Parliamentary Elections" from the Victoria County History