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Bernard Haykel (born 1968)[1] is professor of Near Eastern Studies and the director of the Institute for Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia at Princeton University.[2][3] He has been described as "the foremost secular authority on the Islamic State’s ideology" by journalist Graeme C.A. Wood.[4]

Haykel, of "partially" Lebanese ancestry, grew up in Lebanon and in the United States.[4] He was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship in Yemen in 1992-1993. He obtained a bachelor's degree in International Politics at Georgetown University, MA, M Phil and, in 1998, Ph.D. in Islamic and Middle-Eastern Studies from the University of Oxford. After working as a post-doctoral research fellow at Oxford University in Islamic Studies, he joined New York University in 1998 as associate professor before taking up his post at Princeton.[3] He became a Guggenheim Fellow in 2010.[5]

In addition to English, Haykel is fluent in Arabic and French and has taught advanced level Arabic at Georgetown, Oxford and Princeton.[6]

BooksEdit

  • Saudi Arabia in Transition; Insights on Social, Political, Economic and Religious Change.(Cambridge University Press, 2015) co-editor with Thomas Hegghammer, and Stéphane Lacroix.[7]
  • Revival and Reform in Islam: the Legacy of Muhammad al-Shawkānī (Cambridge Studies in Islamic Civilization, Cambridge University Press, 2003).[8][9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Haykel, Bernard (2003-05-27). Revival and Reform in Islam: The Legacy of Muhammad Al-Shawkani. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521528900.
  2. ^ "Bernard Haykel". Princeton University. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Declaration of Prof. Bernard Haykel" (PDF). Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  4. ^ a b Wood, Graeme (March 2015). "What ISIS Really Wants". The Atlantic. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  5. ^ "Bernard Haykel", Guggenheim Fellows, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, retrieved 2015-08-20.
  6. ^ "Declaration of Prof. Bernard Haykel" (PDF). Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  7. ^ Waterbury, John (September 2015). "Saudi Arabia in Transition: Insights on Social, Political, Economic and Religious Change (book review)". Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 2 December 2015.
  8. ^ Reinhart, A. Kevin (December 2005), "Reviewed Work: Revival and Reform in Islam: the Legacy of Muhammad al-Shawkānī by Bernard Haykel", Middle East Studies Association Bulletin, 39 (2): 226–228, JSTOR 23063033.
  9. ^ Choudary, Maqsood (October 2004), "Revival and Reform in Islam: the Legacy of Muhammad al-Shawkani; Bernard Haykel", Digest of Middle East Studies, 13 (2): 78–79, doi:10.1111/j.1949-3606.2004.tb00866.x

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