Berman Medical Library

Berman Medical Library is located in the Ein Kerem Campus of the Hebrew University. The library provides services to the research staff and the students of the Faculties of medicine, pharmacy, nursing, dentistry, public health, occupational therapy, and also to the clinical-academic staff in the Hadassah Medical Center.

HistoryEdit

Berman Medical Library was founded in 1919 with the help of Julius Jarcho, a consulting gynecologist of Beth Israel and Sydenham Hospitals. In 1930 the library was named in his honour, The Dr. Julius Jarcho Medical Library.[1][2] In the early days the library served as the central medical library in Israel, with branches across the country. In 1966 the Library merged with the Hadassah Medical Center. In 1975 the library moved to its current building, donated by Muriel and Philip Berman of Allentown, Pennsylvania. Since about 2000 the library has also included a medical history museum. Since 2003 the library has been administratively incorporated in the University Library Authority.

Siegfried Plaschkes was the creator of the medical history museum. The Museum was transferred to the Berman Medical Library at the beginning of the millennium. It contains collections of Hebrew amulets, medals, ex-libris, medical stamps, and a number of ancient instruments.[3][4] The collection of historical works and literature] is the most significant in the country. The collection donated by Süssman Muntner, dealing primarily with Maimonides.

The Division of the History of Medicine is located within Berman Medical Library. Joshua O. Leibowitz (1895-1993) was the first head of the division. Leibowitz was for several years the President of the International Academy of the History of Medicine. His follower, Samuel S. Kottek (emeritus) was the second head, from 1975 till 2000. The Division is now headed by Otniel Dror. The unit provides teaching, ongoing research, and tutoring of MD and PhD theses.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "204 Students Now Attending Hebrew University; Medical Library Named for Jarcho". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. 28 December 1930. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  2. ^ "Pays Honor to Dr. Jarcho; University In Jerusalem Gives His Name to Library He Aided". The New York Times. 28 December 1930.
  3. ^ Siegel-Itzkovich, Judy (28 June 2015). "Combining old and new to teach medical students". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  4. ^ "HEBREW UNIVERSITY TO HONOR BERMANS AS 'FRIENDS OF ISRAEL'". The Morning Call. 24 October 1984. Retrieved 18 January 2017.

External linksEdit

31°45′51″N 35°09′00″E / 31.764053396060838°N 35.15008257550164°E / 31.764053396060838; 35.15008257550164Coordinates: 31°45′51″N 35°09′00″E / 31.764053396060838°N 35.15008257550164°E / 31.764053396060838; 35.15008257550164