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Beaverlodge is a town in northern Alberta, Canada. It is located on Highway 43, 43 km (27 mi) west of Grande Prairie and 48 km (30 mi) east of the British Columbia border.

Beaverlodge
Town
Town of Beaverlodge
Highway 43 passing through Beaverlodge
Highway 43 passing through Beaverlodge
Location in County of Grande Prairie
Location in County of Grande Prairie
Beaverlodge is located in Alberta
Beaverlodge
Beaverlodge
Location of Beaverlodge in Alberta
Coordinates: 55°12′34″N 119°25′45″W / 55.20944°N 119.42917°W / 55.20944; -119.42917Coordinates: 55°12′34″N 119°25′45″W / 55.20944°N 119.42917°W / 55.20944; -119.42917
CountryCanada
ProvinceAlberta
RegionNorthern Alberta
Planning regionUpper Peace
Municipal districtCounty of Grande Prairie No. 1
Incorporated[1] 
 • VillageJuly 31, 1929
 • TownJanuary 24, 1956
Government
 • MayorGary Rycroft
 • Governing bodyBeaverlodge Town Council
Area
 (2016)[2]
 • Land5.73 km2 (2.21 sq mi)
Elevation730 m (2,400 ft)
Population
 (2016)[2]
 • Total2,465
 • Density430.5/km2 (1,115/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-7 (MST)
HighwaysHighway 43
WaterwaysBeaverlodge River
WebsiteOfficial website

GeographyEdit

ClimateEdit

Beaverlodge experiences a subarctic climate (Köppen climate classification Dfc) that borders on a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb).

DemographicsEdit

In the 2016 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Town of Beaverlodge recorded a population of 2,465 living in 953 of its 1,024 total private dwellings, a 4.2% change from its 2011 population of 2,365. With a land area of 5.73 km2 (2.21 sq mi), it had a population density of 430.2/km2 (1,114.2/sq mi) in 2016.[2]

In the 2011 Census, the Town of Beaverlodge had a population of 2,365 living in 892 of its 981 total dwellings, a 4.5% change from its 2006 population of 2,264. With a land area of 5.58 km2 (2.15 sq mi), it had a population density of 423.8/km2 (1,097.7/sq mi) in 2011.[13]

AttractionsEdit

 
Beaver statue

In 2004, a Giant Beaver statue was unveiled in the town's park, which can be seen from Highway 43.[14]

SportsEdit

The town is the home of the Beaverlodge Blades, a hockey team in the North West Junior Hockey League (NWJHL). The team plays out of the Beaverlodge Arena and was established in 2000.[citation needed]

AmenitiesEdit

The town has an arena, a public library, an indoor swimming pool and play parks.[15]

EducationEdit

There is an elementary school, grade K-6, Junior High students are bused to Hythe for grades 7–9, St. Mary's Catholic School is available for students attending grades 1–9. The high school, Beaverlodge Regional High School (BRHS), is attended by students from Wembley, Valhalla, Hythe, Horse Lakes No. 152B (Indian reserve), Kelly Lake (Metis settlement), Elmworth and St. Mary's in addition to the local Beaverlodge students.

Notable peopleEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Location and History Profile: Town of Beaverlodge" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 7, 2016. p. 43. Retrieved October 13, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
  3. ^ "Alberta Private Sewage Systems 2009 Standard of Practice Handbook: Appendix A.3 Alberta Design Data (A.3.A. Alberta Climate Design Data by Town)" (PDF) (PDF). Safety Codes Council. January 2012. pp. 212–215 (PDF pages 226–229). Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  4. ^ "Beaverlodge CDA". Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010. Environment Canada. Retrieved September 21, 2015.
  5. ^ "Table 5: Population of urban centres, 1916-1946, with guide to locations". Census of the Prairie Provinces, 1946. Volume I: Population. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1949. pp. 397–400.
  6. ^ "Table 6: Population by sex, for census subdivisions, 1956 and 1951". Census of Canada, 1956. Volume I: Population. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1958.
  7. ^ "Table 9: Population by census subdivisions, 1966 by sex, and 1961". 1966 Census of Canada. Western Provinces. Population: Divisions and Subdivisions. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1967.
  8. ^ "Table 3: Population for census divisions and subdivisions, 1971 and 1976". 1976 Census of Canada. Census Divisions and Subdivisions, Western Provinces and the Territories. Population: Geographic Distributions. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1977.
  9. ^ "Table 2: Census Subdivisions in Alphabetical Order, Showing Population Rank, Canada, 1981". 1981 Census of Canada. Census subdivisions in decreasing population order. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1982. ISBN 0-660-51563-6.
  10. ^ "Table 2: Population and Dwelling Counts, for Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions, 1986 and 1991 – 100% Data". 91 Census. Population and Dwelling Counts – Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1992. pp. 100–108. ISBN 0-660-57115-3.
  11. ^ "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Divisions, 2001 and 1996 Censuses – 100% Data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  12. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. January 6, 2010. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  13. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2012. Retrieved February 8, 2012.
  14. ^ "Giant Beaver Sculpture". Town of Beaverlodge. Archived from the original on December 19, 2012. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  15. ^ "Attractions & Facilities". Town of Beaverlodge. Archived from the original on December 19, 2012. Retrieved February 19, 2013.

External linksEdit