Battle of Sirhind (1764)

The battle of Sirhind was fought between Durrani Empire and Ahluwalia Misl in 1764.[6]

Battle of Sirhind
Part of Indian Campaign of Ahmad Shah Durrani
Date26 February 1764
Location
Result
  • Sikh victory.[1]
  • Sikhs capture Sirhind. [2][3]
Belligerents
Punjab flag.svg Sikh Misls Abdali flag.png Durrani Empire
Commanders and leaders
  • Zain Khan Sirhindi [4]
  • Strength
    40,000 Unknown
    Casualties and losses
    Unknown

    BattleEdit

    Ahmad Shah Durrani returned to Afghanistan after appointing Zain Khan Sirhindi as the Governor of Sirhind. Zain Khan Sirhindi, the Afghan Governor was attacked by well equipped force of 40,000 Sikhs. In the battle, the Sikhs killed Zain Khan Sirhindi and many other leading officers of the Afghan army. They then established their rule between river Satluj to Yamuna.[4] The Sikhs captured Sirhind and later handed over the land to Maharaja Ala Singh of Patiala State.[7][8] The city's inhabitants faced particularly harsh treatment from the Sikh armies who razed much of the city and made a deliberate policy of destroying the city's buildings and mosques.[9][10][11]

    ReferencesEdit

    1. ^ Lansford, Tom (2017-02-16). Afghanistan at War: From the 18th-Century Durrani Dynasty to the 21st Century. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 9781598847604.
    2. ^ Bhagata, Siṅgha (1993). A History of the Sikh Misals. Publication Bureau, Punjabi University. p. 181. ...
    3. ^ Syad Muhammad Latif (1984), History of the Panjab from the Remotest Antiquity to the Present Time, Progressive Books, p. 285
    4. ^ a b c Ganḍā, Singh (1959). Ahmad Shah Durrani: Father of Modern Afghanistan. Asia Pub. House. p. 285. ISBN 978-1-4021-7278-6. Retrieved 2010-08-25.
    5. ^ Bhagata, Siṅgha (1993). A History of the Sikh Misals. Publication Bureau, Punjabi University. p. 181. ...
    6. ^ P Dhavan (2011). When Sparrows Became Hawks: The Making of the Sikh Warrior Tradition, 1699-1799. Oxford University Press. p. 92. ISBN 978-0-19-975655-1.
    7. ^ "Marathas and the English Company 1707–1818 by Sanderson Beck". san.beck.org. Retrieved 2015-04-10.
    8. ^ Syad Muhammad Latif (1984), History of the Panjab from the Remotest Antiquity to the Present Time, Progressive Books, p. 274
    9. ^ Randhawa, Karenjot Bhangoo (2012). Civil Society in Malerkotla, Punjab: Fostering Resilience Through Religion. Lexington Books (Rowman and Littlefield). p. 62. ISBN 978-0-7391-6737-3.
    10. ^ Ziad, Waleed (2021-12-14). Hidden Caliphate: Sufi Saints beyond the Oxus and Indus. Harvard University Press. p. 88. ISBN 978-0-674-26937-8.
    11. ^ Amanat, Abbas (2018-11-26). The Persianate World: Rethinking a Shared Sphere. BRILL. p. 143. ISBN 978-90-04-38728-7.