Battle of Brechin

The Battle of Brechin was fought on 18 May 1452 during the reign of James II of Scotland, about two and a half miles north north east of Brechin.[2] It has been regarded as part of the civil war during his reign between the king and an alliance of powerful noble families led by the Black Douglases, which as the king won was significant in the development of a relatively strong centralised monarchy in Scotland during the Late Middle Ages.[2]

Battle of Brechin
Part of Royal–Black Douglas civil war
Marquess of Huntly arms.svg Arms of Lindsay (Earl Crawford).svg
Coats of arms of the Earl of Huntly (left) and Earl of Crawford (right)
Date18 May 1452
Location
Result Royalist Victory[1]
Belligerents
Clan Gordon (Royalists, allied to King James) Clan Lindsay (Rebels, allied to Black Douglases)
Commanders and leaders
Alexander Gordon, 1st Earl of Huntly Alexander Lindsay, 4th Earl of Crawford

A royalist army formed by the Clan Gordon and Clan Ogilvy, led by Alexander Gordon, 1st Earl of Huntly, defeated the rebel Alexander Lindsay, 4th Earl of Crawford, a leading ally of the Black Douglases who was known as "The Tiger".[3] Shortly after Crawford submitted to the king, leaving the Black Douglases more isolated, to be defeated at the Battle of Arkinholm in 1455.[2]

However, it has been argued that it was a localised conflict in the north-east of Scotland, of only limited relevance to wider conflicts in Scotland as a whole in spite of the fact that the Gordons fought under the royal banner.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Macdonald, Angus; Macdonald, Archibald (1896). The Clan Donald. Vol. 1. Inverness: The Northern Counties Publishing Company Ltd. p. 209. Retrieved 7 November 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d Lawson, John Parker (1839). Historical Tales of the Wars of Scotland, And of the Border Raids, Forays and Conflicts. Vol. 1. Edinburgh, London and Dublin: Archibald Fullarton. pp. 215-217. Retrieved 7 November 2021.
  3. ^ Black, David Dackers (1867). The History of Brechin. 74 Princes Street, Edinburgh and Brechin: William Paterson, and Black & Johnston. p. 27-29. Retrieved 7 November 2021.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location (link)

External linksEdit