Basketball Without Borders

Basketball Without Borders is a basketball instructional camp organised by the NBA in conjunction with FIBA, it presents itself as a “basketball development and community outreach program that unites young basketball players to promote the sport and encourage positive social change in the areas of education, health, and wellness”.

Basketball Without Borders logo

Organised annually since 2001, 41 BWB camps have been held across 23 cities in 20 countries with in excess of 2,300 participants from more than 120 countries and territories, 33 of whom were later drafted into the NBA. Around 150 different current and former NBA/WNBA players have joined nearly 140 NBA team personnel as staff.[1]

HistoryEdit

Billed as a “summer camp for 12-14-year-olds designed to promote friendship and understanding through sport” the initial editions focused on peace and international relations, bringing together youths from former Yugoslavia in 2001 shortly after the Yugoslav Wars and from Greece and Turkey in 2002 amidst tense Greek–Turkish relations, with leading participation from the UN in both cases.[2][3]

From the 2003 editions onwards, basketball became the focus of the camps, the age of the participants grew (17 on average) and participants are now mostly selected for their potential although the selection process by FIBA and national federations is an inclusive system that sees consensual selections from weaker basketball countries.

That year also saw the first edition of the camp in Africa, seen as uncharted basketball territory at the time, the camps would later expand to the Americas in 2004 and Asia in 2005, including youth from all around the globe (those from Oceania have attended editions in the two last mentioned regions).

A global camp was first organised in 2015 in New York City as part of the All-Star Game Weekend, it gave an opportunity for the selected players, identified as the best in their regions, to have a taste of the game at its highest level, it was announced as an recurrent annual event.[4]

The camps have gradually become a hotspot for scouts, with an impressive number of former campers who have made it into the NBA (see Attendees) and/or College basketball it is seen as a means of spotting unheralded talent with high upside,[5] players such as Luc Mbah a Moute[6] or Bruno Caboclo[7] are noted examples.

Though basketball skill is now at the forefront of the camp, the social goal is also still pre-eminent, few campers are expected to make it as pros and a declared goal of the camp is to develop its attendees life-skills, with an emphasis on leadership and personal relations, to make them leaders of change in their home countries. Ideally the personal goal for them is to enter a high school or college in the U.S. to get an education they can use in the future,[8] in a given year it was estimated more than sixty former participants were playing and studying in American colleges.[9]

There is a camp for girls as well, with coaches from FIBA and the WNBA, however it receives far less exposure than the boys tournaments.

Basketball Without Borders, and program director Masai Ujiri, are profiled in Hubert Davis's 2016 documentary film Giants of Africa.[10]

FormatEdit

It brings together young players (called campers) usually aged 18 and under to a single location for a few days (3 or 4 on average), they are identified by the FIBA, NBA and participating federations with input from international FIBA/ NBA players from the region, for example for BWB Africa some have been chosen through Sprite Slam camps in the past.[11]

The youths are divided into teams (sometimes after a draft) named after real NBA teams and managed by coaches, those are either NBA or FIBA players and coaches, both current and former. They attend daily clinics of basketball fundamentals (passing, shooting, dribbling...) with these coaches and participate in individual and/or team shooting games for prizes before playing in tournament style games against the other teams.[9][12]

Also offered are seminars for the campers to improve their life-skills (character, leadership, and health concerns...) normally run by local non-government organizations (NGO's).

The camp ends with an All-Star game featuring the camps best players, a game and a camp MVP are then elected (starting from the 2007 edition).[12]

In parallel the organisers also implement social responsibility programmes, with daily community outreach activities in the local area, for example through organising seminars for local youths or Special Olympics. These are supplemented by product donations to local organisations such as schools and usually an NBA Cares initiative such as building or refurbishing playing and educational infrastructures.[13]

The NBA and its corporate sponsors pay for transport, lodging and meals for the campers and the entourage of personnel (including a full training staff for injuries), some of many examples include the La Ghirada center in Treviso that was used in early camps was leased for free by Benetton Group,[2] the campers in BWB Africa flown in by South African Airways [14] whilst Nike has outfitted the campers in multiple camps.[13]

CampsEdit

Year Edition City, Country Dates Attendees Camp MVP
2001 BWB Europe 1[15]   Treviso 30 June to 2 July 50
2002 BWB Europe 2[16]   Istanbul 4 to 7 July 48
2003 BWB Europe 3[17]
BWB Africa 1[18]
  Treviso
  Johannesburg
28 June to 1 July
2 to 6 September
46
106
2004 BWB Americas 1[19]
BWB Europe 4[20]
BWB Africa 2[21]
  Rio de Janeiro
  Treviso
  Johannesburg
28 June to 2 July
24 to 27 July
8 to 11 September
49
42
99
2005 BWB Americas 2[22]
BWB Asia 1[23]
BWB Europe 5[24]
BWB Africa 3[25]
  Buenos Aires
  Beijing
  Treviso
  Johannesburg
30 June to 4 July
11 to 17 July
28 to 31 July
7 to 12 September
57
50
49
106
2006 BWB Asia 2[26]
BWB Europe 6[27]
BWB Americas 3[28]
BWB Africa 4[29]
  Shanghai
  Vilnius
  San Juan
  Johannesburg
8 to 11 June
30 June to 3 July
16 to 19 July
6 to 10 September
46
51
48
114
2007 BWB Asia 3[30]
BWB Americas 4[31]
BWB Europe 7[32]
BWB Africa 5[33]
  Shanghai
  Sao Paulo
  Paris
  Johannesburg
5 to 8 July
31 July to 3 August
6 to 10 August
5 to 9 September
49
51
48
97
Not Awarded
  Jayson Granger
  Nika Metreveli
Not Awarded
2008 BWB Europe 8[34]
BWB Asia 4[35]
BWB Africa 6[36]
  Istanbul
  New Delhi
  Johannesburg
4 to 7 June
1 to 6 July
3 to 8 September
46
45
98
  Nikola Mirotić
  Vishesh Bhriguvanshi
Not Awarded
2009 BWB Asia 5[37]
BWB Americas 5[38]
BWB Africa 7[39]
  Beijing
  Mexico City
  Johannesburg
30 July to 2 August
6 to 9 August
2 to 6 September
47
49
63
Not Awarded
  Santiago Nicolas Scala
  Cyril Bilong Sonna
2010 BWB Asia 6[40]
BWB Africa 8[41]
BWB Europe 9[42]
  Singapore
  Dakar
  Barcelona
28 June to 1 July
5 to 8 August
16 to 19 September
44
55
50
  Tom Daly
  Michel Ange Enanga
  Mateusz Ponitka
2011 BWB Americas 6[43]
BWB Europe 10[42]
BWB Africa 9[44]
  Rio de Janeiro
  Ljubljana
  Johannesburg
29 July to 1 August
8 to 11 August
1 to 4 September
40
50
60
  Gabriel Deck
  Boris Dallo
  Benoit Mbala Mendzana
2012 BWB Asia 7[45]
BWB Africa 10[46]
BWB Europe 11[47]
  Tokyo
  Johannesburg
  Moscow
13 to 16 June
30 August to 2 September
13 to 16 September
56
58
42
  Yuki Togashi
  Romeh Elsadani Sameh Ali
  Nedim Buza
2013 BWB Americas 7[48]
BWB Europe 12[49]
BWB Africa 11[50]
  Buenos Aires
  Lisbon
  Johannesburg
25 to 28 July
15 to 18 August
29 August to 1 September
50
50
60
  Bruno Caboclo
  Federico Mussini
  Gerson Domingos
2014 BWB Europe 13[51]
BWB Asia 8[52]
BWB Africa 11[53]
  Rome
  Taipei
  Johannesburg
2 to 5 June
13 to 16 June
5 to 8 August
50
47
50
  Luc Loubaki
  Mohammad Yousof Vand   Ryogo Sumino
  Luca Lunneman
2015 BWB Global 1[54]
BWB Europe 14[55]
  New York City
  Las Palmas
13 to 15 February
3 to 6 June
50
50
  Dragan Bender
  Ömer Yurtseven
2016 BWB Global 2[56]
BWB Europe 15[57]
  Toronto
  Lohja
12 to 14 February
7 to 10 September
53
40
  Harry Froling
  Arnas Velička
2017 BWB Global 3[58]
BWB Africa 15[59]
BWB Americas 9[60]
BWB Europe 16[61]
  New Orleans
  Johannesburg
  Nassau
  Netanya
14 to 16 February
5 to 8 August
2 to 5 July
13 to 16 August
  R.J. Barrett
  Axel Wegscheider
  Francisco Farabello
  Omar Dieng
2018 BWB Global 4
BWB Asia 10
BWB Africa 16
BWB Europe 17[62]
  El Segundo, California
  New Delhi
  Johannesburg
  Belgrade
16 to 18 February
30 May 30 to 2 June
1 to 4 August
15 to 18 August
?
66
?
63
  Charles Bassey
  Rence Padrigao
  ?
  Deni Avdija[63]
2019 BWB Global 5[64]   Charlotte, North Carolina 15 to 17 February 63   Deni Avdija

Notable AttendeesEdit

Have played in the NBA Have been drafted by NBA teams Have been regularly involved as staff

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Basketball Without Borders Mission.", NBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  2. ^ a b "Basketball Without Borders': National Basketball Association stars to conduct camp for children from former Yugoslavia."UN, Vienna, 26 March 2001. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  3. ^ "Basketball Stars Unite for Goodwill.", NBA, 8 April 2002. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  4. ^ Freifelder, Jack. "NBA goes global for its future.", China Daily, 16 February 2015. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  5. ^ Grant, Dan. "Business Without Borders: The NBA and its International Feeder System.", SamePageTeam.com, 29 August 2014. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  6. ^ "NBA Insider: Mbah a Moute changing lives.", Star Tribune, 22 March 2014. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  7. ^ Koreen, Eric. "Unplugged: Raptors’ Masai Ujiri and Bruno Caboclo’s personal advisor on Toronto’s draft pick.", National Post, 28 June 2014. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  8. ^ Blinebury, Fran. "Young Africans see sport as ticket to U.S. education."Houston Chronicle, 14 September 2004. Retrieved on 8 May 2015.
  9. ^ a b Feinstein, Andrew. "NBA's Basketball Without Borders focuses on more than just the sport."Houston Chronicle, Johannesburg, 2 September 2011. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  10. ^ "Masai Ujiri building on hope with Giants of Africa: Arthur". Toronto Star, September 2, 2016.
  11. ^ "Five picked for BWB camp in South Africa."The Standard (Kenya), 17 August 2009. Retrieved on 8 May 2015.
  12. ^ a b "BWB Americas Fact Sheet."NBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  13. ^ a b Feinstein, Andrew. "Basketball without Borders Americas dedicates NBA Cares Learn and Play Center."UNICEF, New York, 30 July 2007. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  14. ^ Chadwick, Simon & Arthur, Dave. "International Cases in the Business of Sport." Archived 2015-05-18 at the Wayback Machine, p.378 eLibrary, 2008. Retrieved on 8 May 2015.
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  16. ^ "BWB Europe 2002." Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
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  26. ^ "BWB Asia 2006." Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  27. ^ "BWB Europe 2006.", FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  28. ^ "BWB Americas 2006." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  29. ^ "BWB Africa 2006." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  30. ^ "BWB Asia 2007." Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  31. ^ "BWB Americas 2007." Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  32. ^ "BWB Europe 2007." Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  33. ^ "BWB Africa 2007." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  34. ^ "BWB Europe 2008." Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  35. ^ "BWB Asia 2008." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  36. ^ "BWB Africa 2008." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  37. ^ "BWB Asia 2009." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  38. ^ "BWB Americas 2009." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  39. ^ "BWB Africa 2009." Archived 2015-05-18 at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  40. ^ "BWB Asia 2010." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  41. ^ "BWB Africa 2010." Archived April 24, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  42. ^ a b "BWB Europe 2010." Archived October 6, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  43. ^ "BWB Americas 2011." Archived September 18, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  44. ^ "BWB Africa 2011." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  45. ^ "BWB Asia 2012." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  46. ^ "BWB Africa 2012." Archived May 18, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  47. ^ "BWB Europe 2012." Archived April 3, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, FIBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
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  49. ^ "Basketball Without Borders, Europe 2013.", NBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  50. ^ "Basketball Without Borders, Africa 2013.", NBA. Retrieved on 4 May 2015.
  51. ^ "BWB Day 4 Recap: A Visit to the Vatican.", NBA. Retrieved on 5 May 2015.
  52. ^ "Basketball Without Borders, Asia 2014 Recap.", NBA. Retrieved on 5 May 2015.
  53. ^ "BWB Africa Day 4 Recap: Goodbye From Johannesburg!.", NBA. Retrieved on 5 May 2015.
  54. ^ "First-Ever BWB Global Camp Wraps Up From New York.", NBA. Retrieved on 5 May 2015.
  55. ^ "Basketball Without Borders, Europe 2015.", NBA. Retrieved on 19 June 2015.
  56. ^ "NBA.com: Basketball Without Borders, Global Camp 2016 Recap". www.nba.com. Retrieved 2016-11-13.
  57. ^ "NBA, FIBA and FBA to host first Basketball without Borders camp in Finland". FIBA.com. Retrieved 2016-11-13.
  58. ^ "NBA.com: Basketball without Borders Global Camp 2017". www.nba.com. Retrieved 2018-01-27.
  59. ^ "BLOG: Basketball Without Borders Africa". global.nba.com. Retrieved 2017-01-27.
  60. ^ "NBA.com: BWB Americas Daily Blog From the Bahamas". www.nba.com. Retrieved 2018-01-27.
  61. ^ "NBA.com: NBA, FIBA and Israel Basketball Association to Host First Basketball Without Borders Camp in Israel". www.nba.com. Retrieved 2018-01-27.
  62. ^ "Jokic, Vucevic Headline Basketball Without Borders Europe 2018". global.nba.com. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  63. ^ "Sin bivšeg Zvezdinog igrača MVP kampa "Košarka bez granica"". sport.blic.rs. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  64. ^ "2019 NBA All-Star Fifth Annual Basketball Without Borders Global Camp". charlestonchronicle.net. Retrieved 14 February 2019.

External linksEdit