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Barrington D. Parker

Barrington Daniels Parker (November 17, 1915 – June 2, 1993) was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.

Barrington Daniels Parker
Senior Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia
In office
December 19, 1985 – June 2, 1993
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia
In office
December 19, 1969 – December 19, 1985
Appointed byRichard Nixon
Preceded byJoseph Charles McGarraghy
Succeeded byRoyce Lamberth
Personal details
Born
Barrington Daniels Parker

(1915-11-17)November 17, 1915
Rosslyn, Virginia
DiedJune 2, 1993(1993-06-02) (aged 77)
Silver Spring, Maryland
ChildrenBarrington Daniels Parker Jr.
EducationLincoln University (A.B.)
University of Pennsylvania (M.A.)
University of Chicago Law School (J.D.)

Education and careerEdit

Parker was born in Rosslyn, Virginia, on November 17, 1915. His father was dean of the now-closed Terrell Law School in Washington, D.C. Barrington attended Dunbar High School in Washington, and graduated from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania in 1936 with an Artium Baccalaureus degree in economics, and from the University of Pennsylvania in 1938 with a Master of Arts, finally receiving a Juris Doctor from the University of Chicago Law School in 1947.[1]

Federal judicial serviceEdit

On September 15, 1969, Parker was nominated by President Richard Nixon to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia vacated by Judge Joseph Charles McGarraghy. Parker was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 18, 1969, and received his commission on December 19, 1969. Parker assumed senior status on December 19, 1985, and served in that capacity until his death.[1] He died on June 2, 1993 at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Maryland.[2]

Notable casesEdit

Parker's most high profile case was the criminal trial of John Hinckley Jr.[2]

Parker also ordered the closure of the High Security Unit in Lexington, Kentucky, a women's prison wing used to house certain prisoners in isolation based on their political beliefs or affiliations. Parker said in his ruling that: '"The treatment of the plaintiffs has skirted elemental standards of human decency. The exaggerated security, small group isolation and staff harassment serve to constantly undermine the inmates' morale".[3] He ordered the Bureau of Prisons to rewrite its regulations and transfer the handful of prisoners held there into the general prison population.[4]

PersonalEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Barrington Daniels Parker Sr. at the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center.
  2. ^ a b c Dennis Hevesi (June 5, 1993). "Barrington D. Parker, 77, Is Dead. Trial Judge for Reagan's Attacker". The New York Times. Retrieved 2015-09-18.
  3. ^ Judge Bars U.S. From Isolating Prisoners for Political Beliefs. The New York Times, July 17, 1988. https://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=940DE3D91F3BF934A25754C0A96E948260 Retrieved on 20 November 2008
  4. ^ Jan Susler, "The Women's High Security Unit in Lexington, KY", Yale Journal of Law and Liberation 31 (1989): 31-42.

SourcesEdit