Stomiidae

  (Redirected from Barbeled dragonfish)

Stomiidae is a family of deep-sea ray-finned fish, including the barbeled dragonfishes. They are quite small, usually around 15 cm, up to 26 cm. These fish are apex predators and have enormous jaws filled with fang-like teeth.[1] They are also able to hinge the neurocranium and upper-jaw system, which leads to the opening of the jaw to more than 100 degrees.[1] This ability allows them to consume extremely large prey, often 50% greater than their standard length.[1]

Stomiidae
Astronesthes niger.jpg
Astronesthes niger
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Stomiiformes
Suborder: Phosichthyoidei
Family: Stomiidae
Genera

Aristostomias
Astronesthes
Bathophilus
Borostomias
Chauliodus
Chirostomias
Echiostoma
Eupogonesthes
Eustomias
Flagellostomias
Grammatostomias
Heterophotus
Idiacanthus
Leptostomias
Malacosteus
Melanostomias
Neonesthes
Odontostomias
Opostomias
Pachystomias
Photonectes
Photostomias
Rhadinesthes
Stomias
Tactostoma
Thysanactis
Trigonolampa

FeaturesEdit

It is one of the many species of deep-sea fish that can produce their own light through a chemical process known as bioluminescence. A special organ known as a photophore helps produce this light. The deep-sea dragonfishes have large heads, and mouths equipped with many sharp fang-like teeth. They have a long stringlike structure known as barbel, with a light-producing photophore at the tip, attached to their chin. They also have photophores attached along the sides of their body. A specific species of Stomiidae, the Chauliodus, cannot luminescence longer than 30 minutes without adrenaline. However, in presence of adrenaline, it can produce light for many hours.[2] They produce blue-green light, the wavelengths of which can travel the farthest in the ocean. The deep-sea dragonfish waves its barbel back and forth and produces flashing lights on and off to attract prey and potential mates. Many of the species they prey upon also produce light themselves, which is why they have evolved to have black stomach walls to keep the lights concealed while digesting their meal in order to stay hidden from their predators.[citation needed]


Representative species galleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Kenaley, Christopher P. (2012). "Exploring Feeding Behavior In Deep-sea Dragonfishes (Teleostei: Stomiidae): Jaw Biomechanics and Functional Significance of a Loosejaw". Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 106 (1): 224–240. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8312.2012.01854.x.
  2. ^ Mallefet, Jérôme; Duchatelet, Laurent; Hermans, Claire; Baguet, Fernand (2019-01-01). "Luminescence control of Stomiidae photophores". Acta Histochemica. 121 (1): 7–15. doi:10.1016/j.acthis.2018.10.001. ISSN 0065-1281.