Bagalini Bagaliante

The Bagalini Bagaliante (a portmanteau of "Bagalini" and "Glider") is an Italian high-wing, strut-braced, single-seat, pusher configuration, conventional landing gear motor glider that was designed by Marino Bagalini and made available as plans for amateur construction.[1][2]

Bagaliante
Role Motor glider
National origin Italy
Designer Marino Bagalini
Unit cost
US$250 (plans only, 1998)

Design and developmentEdit

The Bagaliante is constructed from wood and metal and is of pod-and-boom layout.[1]

The 12.2 m (40.0 ft) span wing employs a Göttingen 535 airfoil at the wing root, transitioning to an NACA 4412 section at the wingtip. The wing uses a semi-tapered planform, tapering outboard of the mid-span point. The specified engine is a 19 kW (25 hp) Rotax 277 two-stroke aircraft engine, mounted aft of the cockpit and driving a pusher propeller mounted above the tail boom. The fixed mainwheels are located beside the fuselage on small sponsons.[1][3]

Even with the small Rotax 277 fitted, the takeoff and landing distance is 46 m (150.9 ft)[1]

The estimated time to build the aircraft from the plans is 700 hours.[1]

Specifications (Bagaliante)Edit

Data from Purdy[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Length: 6.40 m (21.00 ft)
  • Wingspan: 12.2 m (40 ft 0 in)
  • Airfoil: root: Gottingen 535, tip: NACA 4412
  • Empty weight: 110 kg (242 lb)
  • Gross weight: 185 kg (407 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: 11 litres (2.9 US gal)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Rotax 277 , 19 kW (26 hp)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed wooden

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 87 km/h (54 mph, 47 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 60 km/h (37 mph, 32 kn)
  • Stall speed: 42 km/h (26 mph, 23 kn)
  • Rate of climb: 4.6 m/s (900 ft/min)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Purdy, Don: AeroCrafter - Homebuilt Aircraft Sourcebook, page 304. BAI Communications. ISBN 0-9636409-4-1
  2. ^ Pilot Mix (n.d.). "Bagalini Bagaliante". Retrieved 8 September 2011.
  3. ^ Lednicer, David (2010). "The Incomplete Guide to Airfoil Usage". Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. Retrieved 8 September 2011.

External linksEdit