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Badminton at the 1981 World Games

The badminton events of World Games I were held on July 25–28, 1981, at the San Jose Civic Auditorium in San Jose, California, in the United States. These were the first World Games, an international quadrennial multi-sport event, and were hosted by the city of Santa Clara. China, in its first summer multi-sport event since the 1936 Summer Olympics, competed in badminton only, winning four of the five gold medals.[1] Seventeen of the countries at these Games participated in badminton, making it one of the most represented sports. The players executive of the International Badminton Federation, Ciro Ciniglio, expressed disappointment at the lack of media coverage of badminton, saying, "We have many world champions competing here and ... were hoping all these great players would draw crowds. ... The United States over the years has had very good players, some of the finest. It was our hope to help the sport gain popularity in the United states by showcasing all this fine talent."[2]

Contents

MedalistsEdit

Sources: [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men
Singles   Chen Changjie (CHN)   Morten Frost (DEN)   Prakash Padukone (IND)
  Liem Swie King (INA)
Doubles   Sun Zhian
Yao Ximing (CHN)
  Thomas Kihlström
Stefan Karlsson (SWE)
  Billy Gilliland
Dan Travers (GBR)
  Hariamanto Kartono
Rudy Heryanto (INA)
Women
Singles   Zhang Ailing (CHN)   Sun Ai-Hwang (KOR)   Lene Køppen (DEN)
  Fumiko Tohkairin (JPN)
Doubles   Zhang Ailing
Liu Xia (CHN)
  Nora Perry
Jane Webster (GBR)
  Sun Ai-Hwang
Yun-Ja Kim (KOR)
  Fumiko Tohkairin
Sonoe Otsuka (JPN)
Mixed
Doubles   Gillian Gilks (GBR)
  Thomas Kihlström (SWE)
  Nora Perry
Mike Tredgett (GBR)
  Imelda Wiguno
Christian Hadinata (INA)
  Lene Køppen
Steen Skovgaard (DEN)

DetailsEdit

MenEdit

SinglesEdit

First round

Liem Swie King (Indonesia), bye; S. Egbeyemi (Nigeria) def. K. Zeniya (Japan), 15-1, 15-4; S. Modi (India) won by default over J. Sidek (Malaysia); R. Stevens (England) def. A. Salazar (Peru), 15-4, 15-7; Morten Frost Hansen (Denmark) def. P. Johnson (Canada), 15-3, 15-4; G. Valdez (Peru) won by default over M. Sidek (Malaysia); Stephen Baddeley (England) def. G. Higgins (USA) 15-7, 15-8; M. Hadiyanto (Indonesia) won by default over J. P. Baudoin (Belgium)

Second round

M. Hadiyanto (Indonesia) d. Stephen Baddeley (England); plus other matches

Quarterfinals

1. Liem Swie King (Indonesia) d. Ray Stevens (England), 15-3, 15-7 2. M. Frost Hansen (Denmark) d. Hadiyanto (Indonesia), 15-10, 15-6 3. Chen Changjie (China) d. K. Jolly (England), 18-14, 15-8 4. Prakash Padukone (Indonesia) d. Pat Tryon (Canada), 15-5, 15-3

Semi-finals

1. Hansen d. King, 18-14, 11-15, 15-6 2. Chen d. Padukone, 18-14, 18-16

Final

Chen d. Frost Hansen, 9-15, 15-7, 15-12. Bronze medals: King, Padukone

DoublesEdit

First and second rounds

Sun Zhian/Yao Ximing (China) d. Delfs/Steen Skovgaard (Denmark); plus other matches

Quarterfinals

1. Hariamanto Kartono/Rudy Heryanto (Indonesia) d. Kevin Jolly/Stephen Baddeley (England), 15-9, 15-10 2. Sun Zhian/Yao Ximing (China) d. Christian Hadinata/Chandra (Indonesia), 17-14, 2-15, 15-12 3. Thomas Kihlstrom/Stafan Karlsson (Sweden) d. Stevens/Mike Tredgett (England), 15-12, 15-10 4. William Gilliland/Daniel Travers (Scotland) d. Egbeyemi/Badiru (Nigeria), 15-6, 15-6

Semi-finals

1. Sun Zhian/Yao Ximing d. Kartono/Heryanto, 3-15, 15-11, 15-8 2. Kihlstrom/Karlsson d. Gilliland/Travers, 10-15, 15-0, 15-9

Final

Sun Zhian/Yao Ximing d. Kihlstrom/Karlsson, 12-15, 15-4, 15-6. Bronze medals: Kartono/Heryanto, Gilliland/Travers

WomenEdit

SinglesEdit

First round

Jane Webster (England) d. U. Kinard (USA), 11-7, 11-6; A. Tokuda (sic) (Tookairin[10]) (Japan) won by default over J. Youngberg (Canada); Yun Ja Kim (South Korea[9]) won by default over L. I. Ivana (Indonesia); C. Carton (USA), d. C. Blackhouse (Canada), 11-7, 11-12, 11-7; Y. Yonekura (Japan) won by default over A. Ghia (India)

Second round

Sun Ai Hwang (South Korea[9]) d. G. Edwards (Nigeria), 11-0, 11-1; L. Blumer (Switzerland) won by default over W. Carter (Canada); L. S. Yeng[12] (Chinese Taipei[9]) won by default over V. Wiharjo (Indonesia); Tookairin[10] (Japan) d. Webster (England), 11-7, 11-6; Kim (South Korea[9]) d. Carton (USA), 12-11, 11-1; Lene Koppen, (Denmark), d. Yonekura, 11-3, 11-3; Gillian Gilks (England), won by default over T. Sumirah (Indonesia); Zhang Ailing (China[9]), won by default over S. Skillings (Canada).

Quarterfinals

1. Sun Ai Hwang (South Korea) d. L. Blumer (Switzerland), 11-3, 11-3 2. Fumiko Tookairin[10] (Japan) d. Liu Xia (China)[12], 11-7, 11-6 3. L. Koppen (Denmark) d. Kim (South Korea), 11-4, 11-12, 11-9 4. Zhang Ailing (China) d. Gillian Gilks (England), 11-1, 11-12, 11-0

Semi-finals

1. Hwang d. Tookairin, 11-1, 11-2 2. Zhang Ailing d. Koppen, 11-4, 11-1

Final

Zhang Ailing d. Hwang, 9-11, 11-9, 12-9. Bronze medals: Tookairin, Koppen

DoublesEdit

Quarterfinals

1. Nora Perry/Jane Webster (England) d. Toutz/Kelly (USA), 15-4, 15-4 2. Sun Ai Hwang/Yun Ja Kim (South Korea) d. Y. Yonekura/Imelda Wigoeno (Japan, Indonesia) 15-4, 14-18, 15-4 3. Fumiko Tookairin/Sonoe Otsuka (Japan) d. W. Carter/S. Skillings (Canada), walkover 4. Zhang Ailing/Liu Xia (China) d. Edwards/Edoga (Nigeria), walkover

Semi-finals

1. Perry/Webster d. Hwang/Kim, 8-15, 17-14, 15-10 2. Zhang Ailing/Liu Xia d. Tookairin/Otsuka, 15-4, 15-5

Final

Zhang Ailing/Liu Xia d. Perry/Webster, 11-15, 15-4, 15-8. Bronze medals: Hwang/Kim, Tookairin/Otsuka

MixedEdit

DoublesEdit

Quarterfinals

Thomas Kihlstrom/Gillian Gilks (Sweden, England) d. William Gilliland/Chapman (Scotland); plus other matches

Semi-finals

1. Mike Tredgett/Nora Perry (England) d. Steen Skovgaard/Lene Koppen (Denmark), 11-15, 15-4, 15-8 2. Thomas Kihlstrom/Gillian Gilks (Sweden, England) d. Christian Hadinata/Imelda Wiguno (Indonesia), 15-8, 15-8

Final

Kihlstrom/Gilks d. Tredgett/Perry, 15-6, 18-14. Bronze medals: Hadinata/Wiguno, Skovgaard/Koppen

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Sargis, Joe (July 29, 1981). "For the Republic of China, the climb back into..." United Press International. 
  2. ^ a b "World Games playing to mediocre crowds". San Jose Mercury News. July 28, 1981. p. 1D. 
  3. ^ "World Games I Results At Santa Clara Calif., July 24 (sic)". United Press International. July 25, 1981. 
  4. ^ "Santa Clara, USA 1981 Calendar & Results". International World Games Association. Retrieved 2015-10-25. 
  5. ^ "Results of the World Games". International World Games Association. Retrieved 2015-10-25. 
  6. ^ "World Games". San Jose Mercury-News. San Jose, California. July 26, 1981. p. 14E. 
  7. ^ "World Games". San Jose Mercury-News. San Jose, California. July 29, 1981. p. 10D. 
  8. ^ "World Games". San Jose Mercury-News. San Jose, California. July 30, 1981. p. 12E. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f Sargis, Joe (July 25, 1981). "Ana Maria Carrasco of Venezuela shattered her own world..." United Press International. [I]n women's singles, which progressed through two rounds, Korea had two winners while Taipei and the [People's] Republic of China had one each. 
  10. ^ a b c d Baddeley, Stephen (October 1981). "China surge through to four titles". Badminton. p. 10-12. 
  11. ^ "German fin swimmer wins fourth gold medal". San Jose Mercury-News. San Jose, California. July 28, 1981. p. 3D. 
  12. ^ a b One source (UPI, "Results", July 25) shows L.S. Yeng of Chinese Taipei advancing out of the second round of women’s singles. However, in subsequent days, the press agency does not publish the later quarterfinal results. Another source (Badminton magazine) begins with the quarterfinal results but does not mention L.S. Yeng. Instead it shows Liu Xia losing here. Yet the first source does not mention Liu Xia in its reports of women’s singles (mentioning her only at women's doubles.)