Black Caucus of the American Library Association

  (Redirected from BCALA Literary Awards)

The Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA) is an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA) that focuses on the needs of African American library professionals by promoting careers in librarianship, funding literacy initiatives, and providing scholarships.[1][2]

Black Caucus of the American Library Association
logo of BCALA which is a black circle with the organization's name against a background of an open book, also in black
NicknameBCALA
Formation1970
Founded atChicago, Illinois
52-1892263
HeadquartersHyattsville, Maryland
President
Shauntee Burns-Simpson
Parent organization
American Library Association
Websitewww.bcala.org

HistoryEdit

While work began to organize a Black Caucus of the American Library Association in 1968, this work increased in 1969 when E. J. Josey was appointed to the American Library Association Nominating Committee.[3] For the 1970 Midwinter meeting, black librarians were encouraged to find socially responsible candidates, African American and Caucasian American, for the 1971 council. During the 1970 Midwinter meeting, a Black Caucus was formed to meet the unmet needs of the African American library professionals with Josey as the chairman.[4][2][5]

The Black Caucus was not officially affiliated with the ALA until 1992; the first National Conference of African American Librarians (NCAAL) was also held in 1992.[6]

As an advocacy and solidarity organization, BCALA campaigned to save the library studies program at Clark Atlanta University, a historically black university which had educated the majority of African American librarians until its closing.[7][8] Following the 2010 Haiti earthquake, the BCALA Haitian Relief Fund was created to support relief efforts through the Save the Children Fund and the American Red Cross.[9] In 2015, BCALA planted a tree in Ferguson, Missouri, in honor of Michael Brown.[1]

In 2006, BCALA took part in the first Joint Conference of Librarians of Color, along with the American Indian Library Association, the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association, the Chinese American Librarians Association, and REFORMA.[10][11] This conference was the first national conference sponsored and held by those organizations, which are known as the Associations of Ethnic Librarians.[11][12]

The Joint Council of Librarians of Color (JCLC, Inc.) was founded in June 2015 as an organization “that advocates for and addresses the common needs of the American Library Association ethnic affiliates“;[13] these ethnic affiliates include BCALA, as well as the American Indian Library Association, the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association, the Chinese American Librarians Association, and REFORMA: The National Association to Promote Library & Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking.[14][13][15][16]

GoalsEdit

Mission Statement (revised 1995)[6]

BCALA Mission: The Black Caucus of the American Library Association serves as an advocate for the development, promotion, and improvement of library services and resources to the nation's African American community; and provides leadership for the recruitment and professional development of African American librarians.[17]

MembershipEdit

Fees/levels are:[18]

  • Student $10
  • Library Support Staff $20
  • Retired $25
  • Regular $45
  • Institutional/Institutions $60
  • Corporate $200
  • Lifetime $500

AwardsEdit

The BCALA offers awards for books, e-books, innovative leaders (referred to as trailblazers), and a scholarship in honor of E.J. Josey.

Awards are given for four categories: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry Collection, and First Novel.[19] The initial First Novel award went to Alexs Pate, for the novel Losing Absalom.[20] Some of the recent book awards have been for The Twelve Tribes of Hattie and If One of Us Should Fall.[21] The SELF-e literary award, recognizing self-published poetry and fiction, was created in 2015 by BCALA in partnership with BiblioBoard, becoming the first ebook award sponsored by an organization affiliated with the American Library Association.[22]

The Black Books Galore! contest was sponsored by BCALA to public and school library programs that support increased awareness of African American children's literature through public programming.[23]

ConferencesEdit

The National Conference of African American Librarians (NCAAL) has been held nine times since 1992; the first conference was held in Columbus, Ohio, and organized by Sylvia Sprinkle-Hamlin, conference chair. The schedule of 70 programs included a focus on African-American librarians supporting each other professionally as well as highlighting the work of African-American authors and performers.[24][25] Conferences have continually provided an opportunity for black librarians to network, build community, and address current concerns, such as the need for library subject headings that will allow for easy access to African-American collections.[26]

The August 2015 Conference was held in St. Louis, Missouri. The next National Conference of African American Librarians will be held from August 5–9, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 2020.[27]

In 2006, BCALA took part in the first Joint Council of Librarians of Color (JCLC), along with the American Indian Library Association, the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association, the Chinese American Librarians Association, and REFORMA.[28]

PublicationsEdit

BCALA publications include an Annual Report and Membership Directory and Newsletter.

Governing structureEdit

The BCALA has a president and works through their various committees.

Past presidentsEdit

Most presidents serve two to three consecutive years.

  • 1970-1971 – E.J. Josey
  • 1971-1973 – William D. Cunningham
  • 1973-1974 – James R. Wright
  • 1974-1976 – Harry Robinson, Jr.
  • 1976-1978 – Avery Williams
  • 1978-1980 – Dr. George C. Grant
  • 1980-1982 – Doreitha R. Madden
  • 1982-1984 – Robert L. Wright
  • 1984-1986 – Barbara Williams Jenkins
  • 1986-1988 – Marva L. DeLoach
  • 1988-1990 – Edith M. Fisher
  • 1990-1992 – John C. Tyson
  • 1992-1994 – D. Alex Boyd
  • 1994-1996 – Stanton F. Biddle
  • 1996-1998 – Sylvia Sprinkle-Hamlin
  • 1998-2000 – Gregory Reese
  • 2000-2002 – Gladys Smiley Bell
  • 2002-2004 – Bobby Player
  • 2004-2006 – Andrew P. Jackson (Sekou Molefi Baako)
  • 2006-2008 – Wanda Kay Brown
  • 2008-2010 – Karolyn S. Thompson
  • 2010-2012 – Jos N. Holman
  • 2012-2014 – Jerome Offord, Jr.
  • 2014-2016 – Kelvin A. Watson
  • 2016-2018 – Denyvetta Davis
  • 2018-2020 – Richard E. Ashby, Jr.
  • 2020-2022 – Shauntee Burns-Simpson

CommitteesEdit

  • Affiliates
  • Awards Committee
  • Budget and Finance
  • Constitution and Bylaws
  • Dr. John C. Tyson (Award Committee)
  • Fundraising
  • International Relations
  • Membership
  • Nomination and Election
  • Program
  • Publications
  • Recruitment and Professional Development
  • Technology Advisory

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Michael Brown memorial tree vandalized, plaque stolen". FOX2now.com. 2015-04-20. Retrieved 2019-01-14.
  2. ^ a b "ALA Black Caucus | Busy Beaver Button Museum". buttonmuseum.org. Retrieved 2019-01-14.
  3. ^ Echavarria, Tami and Andrew B. Wertheimer. "Surveying the Role of Ethnic-American Library Associations," Library Trends 46 no. 2 (1997), p. 374.
  4. ^ "Our History". BCALA. Retrieved 2019-01-14.
  5. ^ Irvin., Painter, Nell (2006). Creating Black Americans : African-American history and its meanings, 1619 to the present. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. Table 14.1. ISBN 0195137558. OCLC 57722517.
  6. ^ a b "Black Caucus of the American Library Association", American Library Association, April 19, 2007. http://www.ala.org/groups/affiliates/affiliates/bcala
  7. ^ Chepesiuk, Ron. "Requiem for a Library School? High Noon at Clark Atlanta University," American Libraries 35 no. 11 (2004), p. 32-33.
  8. ^ Sutton, Allison M. "Bridging the Gap in Early Library Education History for African Americans: The Negro Teacher-Librarian Training Program 91936-1939)," The Journal of Negro Education 74 no. 2 (2005), p. 139.
  9. ^ P.A.G. "Global Outreach Underway to Aid Haiti Libraries and Archives." American Libraries 41 no. 3 (2010) p. 22.
  10. ^ "Blazing Trails". American Libraries Magazine. 2018-01-02. Retrieved 2019-01-14.
  11. ^ a b "Remembering JCLC 2006".
  12. ^ "About JCLC 2006". About ALA. August 3, 2006.
  13. ^ a b "About – Joint Council of Librarians of Color".
  14. ^ Young, Christal. "Research Guides: Library & Information Science *: Professional Associations". libguides.usc.edu.
  15. ^ "About | CALA - Chinese American Librarians Association". cala-web.org.
  16. ^ "REFORMA". www.reforma.org.
  17. ^ Hunt, Rebecca D. "AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADERS IN THE LIBRARY PROFESSION: LITTLE KNOWN HISTORY." Black History Bulletin 76, no. 1 (2013): 14-19. http://www.jstor.org/stable/24759707.
  18. ^ "Home".
  19. ^ "Black Caucus of the American Library Association Literary Awards," Poets and Writers. http://www.pw.org/writing_contests/literary_awards_3
  20. ^ "Front Matter," The Black Scholar 24 no. 3 (1994).
  21. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-12-08. Retrieved 2015-11-29.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  22. ^ "ALA Affiliate Launches Ebook Award". American Libraries Magazine. Retrieved 2019-01-14.
  23. ^ McClellan, Sally and M. Evelyn Fields. "Using African American CHildren's Literature to Support Literacy Development," YC Young Children 59 no. 3 (2004) p. 52.
  24. ^ Goldberg, Beverly. "African Americans "stretch the Envelope" at the First Black Caucus Conference," American Libraries 23 no. 10 (Nov 1992), p 832-835.
  25. ^ "First Conference of African American Librarians Convenes in Ohio," The Black Scholar, 23 no. 1 (1993), p. 33.
  26. ^ Echavarria, Tami and Andrew B. Wertheimer. "Surveying the Role of Ethnic-American Library Associations," Library Trends 46 no. 2 (1997), p. 385.
  27. ^ "Black Caucus of the American Library Association". www.ala.org. 19 April 2007. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  28. ^ Landgraf, Greg (2018-01-02). "Blazing Trails". American Libraries. Archived from the original on 2018-01-04. Retrieved 2019-01-14.

External linksEdit