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Azer Zeynalov (Azerbaijani: Zeynalov Azər Zeynalabdin oğlu) (born 13 December 1964) is an Azerbaijani opera singer, (tenor), film composer, actor, and music professor. He is a People's Artist of Azerbaijan and the Republic of Dagestan.[1]

Azer Zeynalov
AzerZeynalov.jpg
Born
Azər Zeynalabdin Zeynalov

(1964-12-13) 13 December 1964 (age 54)
Nakhchivan, Azerbaijan
NationalityAzerbaijani
Occupation
  • opera singer (tenor)
  • music professor
  • composer
Years active1990–present

BiographyEdit

Azer Zeynalov was born in Nakhchivan to an intellectual family. Living in Baku since 1969, Zeynalov started school in 1972 in No. 132 secondary school and No. 12 music school's fortepiano class. In 1982, he entered Azerbaijan State University of Culture and Arts' drama director faculty. During this time, he completed his mandatory 2 years; military service. He graduated in 1989. In 1990 he performed at the Rashid Behbutov State Song Theatre. He also joined Rafiq Babayevin's "Cəngi" ensemble and became a laureate of the "Odlar Yurdu Baki-90" song contest. In 1992 he entered the Baku Music Academy's vocal branch. In 1994 he entered the vocal branch of the Agostino Steffani Italian State Conservatory in Castelfranco, Veneto. He took vocal lessons for 2 years from professor Alemanno Osvaldo, who was the assistant and student of Mario Del Monaco. In 1995, he was awarded the gold medal by the "European Turkish-Islamic Cultural Society". In 1996 he finished his education as an opera singer and came back to Azerbaijan and became a soloist in the Azerbaijan State Academic Opera and Ballet Theater.

With his "Lyrico-dramatic tenor" voice tone he is one of the leading performers in Europe and Azerbaijan. Azer Zeynalov also performs the songs, romances and oratorios of Azerbaijani composers. These include Emin Sabitoglu's "Sukriyyə", "Genceden gelirem", Tofig Guliyev's "Bextever oldu", "Azerbaijan" (originally written as "Russia" for the film "Bextiyar", with Zeynalov's Azeri-language rendition the first performance in this language), Rauf Hajiyev's "Leyla" (also a song originally written in Russian, with Zeynalov the first to perform it in Azeri), Ramiz Mirishli's "Veten harayi", Ruhengiz Qasimova's "Seninleyem, Azerbaycan", Ramiz Mustafayev's "Mehemmed and Leyla", Vasif Adigozalov's "Qem karvani", "Tenteneli kantata", "Çanaqqala", "Qarabağ şikestesi", Mobil Babayev's "Ölüm-qara qarışqa", Azer Dadashov's "Ana yurdu" odasi etc. Folk music is also part of his repertoire.

His first album "Şükriyyə" was released in 1997 by RAQS in Turkey. In 1998 he was named the People's Artist of the Republic of Azerbaijan. He has performed in Italy, Austria, England, France, Sweden, Germany, Czech Republic, the Netherlands, China, Turkey, TRNC, Russia, Belarus, Moldova, Gagauz, Ukraine, Dagestan, Georgia, Tajikistan, Tatarstan, Kazakhstan, Tatarstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Hungary, India, Morocco, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, USA and Canada. Since 2001, Zeynalov has worked as the head of the department of vocal pedagogy of Azerbaijan State University of Culture and Art. In 2008 he was awarded the title of People's Artist of the Republic of Dagestan. His book Vocal Singing was published in 2012, the first textbook in Azerbaijani in this field.

On 30 April 2014 and 6 May 2015, he received the Azerbaijan President's Award given to leading figures in the arts.[2]

Personal lifeEdit

He is from the family of Nesreddin Tusi and the son of poet Zeynel Vefa.. He is married and has four children.

OperaEdit

WorksEdit

  • "Vocal singing" book (textbook) -2012
  • Vocal program for Magistr preparation -2008
  • Vocal program for Bachelor preparation -2012
  • Vocal program for Bachelor preparation -2016
  • The teachers who have endeavored in the establishment and development of our 50 years old cafedra.(Album)-2012

FilmographyEdit

  1. Bircəciyim (movie, 1986)
  2. Cry (movie, 1993)
  3. Girl tower (movie, 2000) (composer)
  4. Dream (movie, 2001)
  5. Balash and Medine (movie, 2003)
  6. Griefs do not end (movie, 2009)(singer)
  7. Capsized world (movie, 2011)
  8. Three meetings (movie, 2012)

ReferencesEdit