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Azanian People's Organisation

The Azanian People's Organisation (AZAPO) is a South African political party. The organisation's two student wings are the Azanian Students' Movement (AZASM) for high school learners and the other being for tertiary students called the Azanian Students' Convention (AZASCO), its women's wing is Imbeleko Women's Organisation, simply known as IMBELEKO. Its inspiration is drawn from the Black Consciousness Movement philosophies developed by Steve Biko, Onkgopotse Tiro and Vuyelwa Mashalaba, as well as Marxist Scientific Socialism.

Azanian People's Organisation
President Strike Thokoane
Chairperson Zithulele Nyangana Absalom Cindi
Secretary-General [Zithulele Nyangana Cindi]]
Deputy Secretary General [[]]
Honorary President Mosibudi Mangena
Founder Stephen Biko, Onkgopotse Tiro, Mthuli ka Shezi, Mapetla Mohapi and others.
Founded 28 April 1978 (1978-04-28)
Merger of BCMA and Azapo
Preceded by Black People's Convention
Headquarters Suite 702, Nedbank Building, 145 Smal Street, Johannesburg
Student wing Azanian Student Convention
Youth wing Azanian Youth Organisation
Women's wing Imbeleko
Liberation Army Azanian National Liberation Army
(formerly)
Student Wing for High School Students Azanian Student's Movement
Ideology Socialism,
Black Consciousness
Colours Black, Red, and Orange               
Slogan The People's Movement"
National Assembly seats
0 / 400
Party flag
Azapo flag.png
Website
www.azapo.org.za

Contents

HistoryEdit

It was founded in 1978 out of three organisations: the Black People's Convention (BPC), the South African Students' Organisation (SASO) and the Black Community Programmes (BCP). These were three of the 17 black consciousness organisations that were banned on Wednesday, 19 October 1977 for their role in the armed resistance and the 16 June 1976 Soweto uprisings. A year after the formation of AZAPO, in September 1979, at its conference in Roodepoort, the national executive was formed with Curtis Nkondo as its president.[1]:436 During 1987, AZAPO was banned by the South African government and forced underground and into exile.[1]:436 It would be unbanned in 1990.[1]:436 In October 1994, AZAPO merged with its sister organisation in exile, the Black Consciousness Movement of Azania (BCMA).[1]:436

AZAPO campaigned for the isolation of South Africa during its apartheid years by waging a so-called "cultural boycott" in the country; black people increasingly regained their resolve to fight for their rights and formed trade unions and civic organisations.

The armed wing of AZAPO was the Azanian National Liberation Army (AZANLA) which received support and military training in China, Libya, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Eritrea. There was an agreement with Iraq to train AZANLA combantants but that was thwarted by the First Gulf War in 1990. During the 1980s, it was engaged in a bloody internecine feud with the ANC[citation needed].

AZAPO, along with its youth wing AZAYO were unbanned in 1990, which permitted it to continue its political programs legally. It was invited, but refused to participate in, the negotiations to end apartheid, a decision which led to the resignation of two senior members, Monwabisi Vuza and Imraan Moosa.[2] The party then boycotted the 1994 elections, but has participated in each of the elections since then. On 21 March 1998 a faction broke away to form the Socialist Party of Azania (SOPA). AZAPO won one seat in each of the 1999, 2004 and 2009 elections, but failed to win a seat in the 2014 general election.

The current leader of the party is Prof Itumeleng Mosala.

Negotiations with SOPAEdit

The party has had regular negotiations with SOPA aimed at merging the two parties, but these broke down in 2004, 2007 and again in 2013.[3][4]

Election resultsEdit

National electionsEdit

Election Total votes Share of vote Seats +/– Government
1999 27,257 0.17
1 / 400
in opposition
2004 39,116 0.25
1 / 400
  ±0 in opposition
2009 38,245 0.22
1 / 400
  ±0 in opposition
2014 20,421 0.11
0 / 400
  1 extraparliamentary

Provincial electionsEdit

Election Eastern Cape Free State Gauteng Kwazulu-Natal Limpopo Mpumalanga North-West Northern Cape Western Cape
 % Seats  % Seats  % Seats  % Seats  % Seats  % Seats  % Seats  % Seats  % Seats
1999 - - - - 0.16% 0/73 0.17% 0/80 0.54% 0/49 0.10% 0/30 - - 0.41% 0/30 - -
2004 0.17% 0/63 0.35% 0/30 0.25% 0/73 0.26% 0/80 0.51% 0/49 0.19% 0/30 0.29% 0/33 0.52% 0/30 0.09% 0/42
2009 0.20% 0/63 - - 0.21% 0/73 - - 0.38% 0/49 0.23% 0/30 0.25% 0/33 0.60% 0/30 0.07% 0/42
2014 0.12% 0/63 0.16% 0/30 0.12% 0/73 0.15% 0/80 0.26% 0/49 0.09% 0/30 0.17% 0/33 0.25% 0/30 0.04% 0/42

Municipal electionsEdit

Election Votes  % +/–
2000 0.3%
2006 74,627 0.3%
2011 50,631 0.2%
2016[5] 28,049 0.07%

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Maaba, Brown Bavusile (2001). "The Archives of the Pan Africanist Congress and the Black Consciousness-Orientated Movements". History in Africa. 28: 417–438. doi:10.2307/3172227. JSTOR 3172227. (Registration required (help)). 
  2. ^ "Azanian People's Organization (AZAPO)". South African History online. Retrieved 17 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "Azapo, Sopa merge ahead of polls". Independent Online. 6 June 2013. Retrieved 17 May 2014. 
  4. ^ "Impasse thwarts Azapo, Sopa merger". Independent Online. 5 December 2013. Retrieved 17 May 2014. 
  5. ^ "Results Summary - All Ballots" (PDF). elections.org.za. Retrieved 11 August 2016. 

External linksEdit