Axwell House

Coordinates: 54°57′10″N 1°42′11″W / 54.95278°N 1.70306°W / 54.95278; -1.70306

Axwell Hall, 2003

Axwell House (also Axwell Hall or Axwell Park) is a mansion house and Grade II* listed building, situated at Axwell Park, Blaydon, Tyne and Wear, England.[1]

The house and surrounding estate were developed in 1758 and owned by the Clavering baronets until 1920 when it became a Ragged School. Since 2005 it has been under development as new houses and apartments.

HistoryEdit

An early manor house on the site was acquired by James Clavering, a merchant adventurer of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1629 for £1,700.[2] In 1758 his descendant Sir Thomas Clavering of the Clavering baronets replaced the house with a substantial mansion and assisted architect James Paine (1712–1789) in the Palladian design of the new house.[3] The grounds were laid out in the style of Capability Brown.[4] Alterations were around 1818 by John Dobson.[5]

The hall and its surrounding 60 acres (24 ha) was converted for use as the Newcastle Ragged School in 1920.[6] It was initially an Industrial School amd then an Approved school.[7] It had spaces for 153 children and closed in 1981.[8][9]

Having stood empty, neglected and deteriorating the property was acquired in 2005 by property developers, Eight Property Ltd, for restoration and conversion to residential apartments.[10][8][11] The company built 27 appartments and houses around the old stable block and are developing the main house.[9]

ArchitectureEdit

The three-storey stone building has a slate roof. The south front has a three-bay with a pediment. It was deisgnated as a listed building in 1985.[1]

Some of the walls and balustrades are also listed,[12] as is the late 18th or early 19th century sandstone bridge 280 metres (920 ft) south of the house.[13]

The attached farm has a late 18th or early 19th century dovecote.[14] The grounds also included a dairy, walled kitchen garden and stables.[8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Axwell Park and steps and balustrades to south". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  2. ^ National Archives: Durham Record Office, Clavering Family Papers Ref D/CG7/14-16
  3. ^ Structures of the North East Archived May 26, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "The History of Axwell Park". Axwell Park. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Conservation Area Character Statements, Strategies and Policy Guidelines" (PDF). Gateshead Council. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  6. ^ "Axwell Hall - sitelines.newcastle.gov.uk". twsitelines.info. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 4 April 2015.
  7. ^ Veitch, Roly. "Axwell Hall (aka Axwell House) - The Bad Lads School". Roly Veitch. Archived from the original on 10 September 2015. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  8. ^ a b c Henderson, Tony (26 January 2016). "Axwell Hall in Derwent Valley to be converted into 20 homes as it gets new lease of life at last". Chronicle Live. Archived from the original on 1 January 2017. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  9. ^ a b "Axwell Hall". House and Heritage. Archived from the original on 4 April 2019. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  10. ^ nechronicle Administrator (23 June 2005). "Historic hall is set to reopen". nechronicle. Archived from the original on 18 October 2014. Retrieved 4 April 2015.
  11. ^ "The Development". Axwell Park. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  12. ^ "Retaining wall, balustrade, piers and steps to terrace south of Axwell Park". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  13. ^ "Bridge 280 metres south of Axwell Park". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  14. ^ "Dovecot at Axwell Park House Farm". National Heritage List forEngland. Historic England. Retrieved 19 March 2020.