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The Australian Institute of Physics was established in 1963, when it replaced the Australian Branch of the British Institute of Physics based in London.[1] The purpose of the institute is to further promote the development and application of the science of physics as well as providing support to physicists.[2] The AIP publishes Australian Physics (ISSN 1036-3831) since 1963. Every two years, the Institute organises a national congress, the latest being held in December 2014 at the Australian National University in Canberra.[3]

Contents

OrganisationEdit

The institute has branches in each of the six Australian states, and topical groups in the following areas:

PresidentsEdit

  • 1962–65 Leonard Huxley[9]
  • 1966–67 F. Lehany
  • 1968 Alan Walsh[10]
  • 1969–70 A. Harper
  • 1971–72 Robert Street[11]
  • 1973–74 F. J. Jacka
  • 1975–76 J. Campbell
  • 1977–78 Terry Sabine
  • 1979–80 Herbert Bolton[12]
  • 1981–82 Neville Fletcher
  • 1983–84 G. V. H. Wilson
  • 1985–86 T. Fred Smith
  • 1987–88 John Collins
  • 1989–90 Anthony Klein[13]
  • 1991–92 Anthony Thomas[14]
  • 1993–94 Robert Crompton[15]
  • 1995–96 Ron McDonald
  • 1997–98 Jaan Oitmaa
  • 1999–2000 John Pilbrow
  • 2001–02 John O'Connor
  • 2003–04 Rob Elliman
  • 2005–06 David Jamieson
  • 2007–08 Cathy Foley[16]
  • 2009–10 Brian James[17]
  • 2011–12 Marc Duldig
  • 2013–14 Robert Robinson
  • 2015–16 Warrick Couch
  • 2017–18 Andrew Peele

AwardsEdit

The Bragg Gold Medal for Excellence in Physics has been awarded since 1992 for the best PhD thesis by a student from an Australian University and to commemorate Sir Lawrence Bragg (in front on the medal) and his father Sir William Henry Bragg who both played a significant part in physics education in Australia. Winners so far are:[18]

Honorary Fellows of the Australian Institute of Physics (partial list)Edit

Fellows of the Australian Institute of Physics (partial list)Edit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A History of the Physics Department of the University of Queensland Emeritus Professor H C Webster, 31 March 1977, Accessed 6 February 2012 Archived 19 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ National Library of Australia accessed 5 February 2012
  3. ^ http://aip2014.org.au/index.asp?IntCatId=14
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 December 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2018.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 December 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2018.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 December 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2018.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 December 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2018.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 December 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2018.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ Rosanne Walker. "Huxley, Leonard George Holden -Biographical entry". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 22 May 2012.
  10. ^ McCarthy, G.J. "Walsh, Alan – Biographical entry". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 22 May 2012.
  11. ^ McCarthy, G.J. "Street, Robert – Biographical entry". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 22 May 2012.
  12. ^ McCarthy, G.J. "Bolton, Herbert Cairns – Biographical entry". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 22 May 2012.
  13. ^ McCarthy, G.J. "Klein, Anthony George (Tony) – Biographical entry". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 22 May 2012.
  14. ^ "Anthony Thomas: Brief Biography". University of Adelaide. Retrieved 19 May 2012.
  15. ^ Rosanne Walker. "Crompton, Robert Woodhouse – Biographical entry". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 22 May 2012.
  16. ^ "Physics President sets precedent". Archived from the original on 18 May 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2012.
  17. ^ "Physics around the country – April 2009". Australian Institute of Physics. Archived from the original on 17 March 2012. Retrieved 25 May 2012.
  18. ^ "The Bragg Gold Medal for Excellence in Physics". Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2018.