Atticus Greene Haygood

Atticus Greene Haygood (1839–1896) was an American bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He edited a Wesleyan newspaper, served as president of Emory College, and wrote several publications.

Atticus Greene Haygood
Atticus Greene Haygood (1839–1896).png
President of Emory College
In office
1876–1884
Personal details
Born(1839-11-19)November 19, 1839
Watkinsville, Georgia
DiedJanuary 19, 1896(1896-01-19) (aged 56)
Oxford, Georgia
OccupationClergyman
Signature

BiographyEdit

Atticus Greene Haygood was born in Watkinsville, Georgia on November 19, 1839, and graduated at Emory College in 1859.[1][2] He entered the ministry where he edited the Sunday-school publications of the Southern branch of the church. He edited the Wesleyan Christian Advocate (1878–82), served as president of Emory (1876–1884),[1][3] and was a General Agent of the Slater Fund, which assisted educational institutions for African Americans following Reconstruction.

Haygood declined an election as Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in 1882; but he accepted another election in 1890. Rev. T. H. Tyson established a newspaper for African Americans in Oklahoma in 1890 called Our Brother in Black, after one of Haygood's texts.[4]

Atticus Greene Haygood died in Oxford, Georgia on January 19, 1896.[2] Haygood Hall, a dormitory at Oxford College of Emory University, is named for him. The neighboring United Methodist Church is Haygood Memorial of Atlanta, named for Bishop A. G. Haygood.

WorksEdit

  • Our children (1876)
  • Our Brother in Black (1881)
  • Speeches and Sermons (1884)
  • Pleas for Progress (1889)
  • Jackknife and Brambles (1893)
  • The Monk and the Prince (1895)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography. I. James T. White & Company. 1893. p. 520. Retrieved April 30, 2021 – via Google Books.
  2. ^ a b "Death of Bishop Haygood". The Watchman and Southron. Atlanta. January 22, 1896. p. 3. Retrieved April 30, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ Emory History: President Haygood, accessed 25 May 2017.
  4. ^ https://www.muskogeephoenix.com/news/local_news/african-american-publishers-served-community/article_85a6aefc-af56-11e4-a18e-cb6a090daf22.amp.html

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit