Artist's Sketch of Pharaoh Spearing a Lion

Artist's Sketch of Pharaoh Spearing a Lion is an ostracon drawing from the Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt (ca. 1186–1070 B.C.). It is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[1]

Artist's Sketch of Pharaoh Spearing a Lion
Artist's Sketch of Pharaoh Spearing a Lion MET 1191R2 Sec501M.jpg
YearTwentieth Dynasty of Egypt
LocationMetropolitan Museum of Art
Accession No.26.7.1453 Edit this on Wikidata
IdentifiersThe Met object ID: 544076

Early history and creationEdit

This is a piece of limestone sketched with ink. It was a sketch that was discarded in the Valley of the Kings, and discovered at the Tomb of Tutankhamun, near the entrance, during excavations in 1920.[2]

Description and interpretationEdit

The work depicts a pharaoh spearing a lion. The lion symbolizes the enemies of Egypt. The hieratic text reads: "The slaughter of every foreign land, the Pharaoh—may he live, prosper, and be healthy."[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Artist's Sketch of Pharaoh Spearing a Lion". Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  2. ^ "The Ancient Way of Life". The Ancient Way of Life. Retrieved 2020-07-07.