Arthur Stone (actor)

Arthur Stone (born Arthur Taylor Goetze, November 28, 1883 – September 4, 1940) was an American character actor of the late silent and early sound film eras.

Arthur Stone
ArthurStone1934.jpg
Stone in She Had to Choose (1934)
Born
Arthur Taylor Goetze

(1883-11-28)November 28, 1883
DiedSeptember 4, 1940(1940-09-04) (aged 56)
OccupationActor
Years active1924–1938
Spouse(s)Dorothy Westmore

BiographyEdit

Born in St. Louis, Missouri, on November 28, 1883, Stone entered the film industry by starring in several film shorts for the Hal Roach Studios in 1924 and 1925. 1926 would see his first appearance in a feature film, Miss Nobody, directed by Lambert Hillyer and starring Walter Pidgeon.[1] During the remainder of the silent era, he would appear in over a dozen films, in either supporting or starring roles. 1926 would see him in supporting roles, but 1927 and 1928 would see him move up to star billing in such films as The Valley of the Giants (1927),[2] The Farmer's Daughter (1928),[3] and Chicken a la King (1928).[4] With the advent of sound films, 1929 would see Stone continue to be cast in featured roles, such as The Far Call and Fugitives.[5][6]

The 1930s would see Stone almost exclusively in supporting and smaller roles, as in Bordertown (1935), starring Paul Muni and Bette Davis,[7] and 1936's Fury, directed by Fritz Lang, and starring Sylvia Sydney and Spencer Tracy.[8] His final on-screen performance would be in Edward F. Cline's Go Chase Yourself (1938), starring Joe Penner and Lucille Ball.[9] During his brief career, he would appear in over 50 films, and numerous shorts.[10]

Stone died on September 4, 1940, in Hollywood, California, and was buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.[11]

FilmographyEdit

(Per AFI database)[10]

Other films not listed by AFI

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Miss Nobody". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  2. ^ "The Valley of the Giants". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  3. ^ "The Farmer's Daughter". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  4. ^ "Chicken a la King". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  5. ^ "The Far Call". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  6. ^ "Fugitives". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  7. ^ "Bordertown". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 28, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  8. ^ "Fury". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 28, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  9. ^ "Go Chase Yourself". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  10. ^ a b "Arthur Stone". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  11. ^ Mack Sennett's Fun Factory

External linksEdit